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♦ 

FREE AMIGA BUYER'S GUIDE. 


March 1987 
S2.95 U.S. 

S3.95 Canada 
ISSN 0744-8724 


^■11 


11 ■■ 


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■ 1 


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T?!7Tif1 











C64/128 Banking 

In IIOIII6 ti 



Soflwiire Reviews 

,1fie Big Bkie Reader 
Defender of Itie Chwm 
Jet and Scenery Desks' 



Free lype-in Rrograms 

Bonier IHitrol 
ielteritifiht! 
Supersweep 128 
AmigdUfe . 




■■:v«-',. I f, % .V ;ATft-:i;A ^ i 



We iusi did something only tiie best can do! 
We made our award winning* software for tiie 
Commodore ^'^ 1 28 and 64 computers even better! 



Inlroducing . . . 

Pocket Writer 2 

word processor 
Pocket Pfanner 3 

spreadsheet 
Pocket Filer 2 

Pt dotobose 

New Features 

Our new Pocket 2 series offers features usually found only in 
much more sophisticated opplications software. Features thot 
include; compatability with the new GEOS operating system!, 
ability to work with the Commodore RAM expander to allow o 
RAM disk, mouse support with pull down menus, 1571 burst 
mode for faster file loading, increased support for two single disk 
drives, automatic configuration for screen color, format and 
printer selection t. 

Sophisticated software, yes, and still easy to use. You can be 
up and running in under 30 minutes even if you haven't operated 
a computer before. 

2 Programs in 1 

Now, when you upgrade your Commodore^" 64 to a 128, 
Pocket software helps make it a breeze. The new Pocket 2 
software has both 128 and 64 applications on the same disk. So 
when you buy one you ore actually buying two software 
packages. The cost only $59.95 (U.S.). 

6 Programs in 1 

The 1 80% Solution saves you money! You con buy all three 
Pocket 2 applications, Pocket Writer 2, Pocket Planner 2 and 
Pocket Filer 2 in one convenient Superpak for the low price of 
only S99.95 (U.S.). A super way to discover all the integrated 
features of Pocket 2 software and save almost eighty dollars. 

As a companion to Pocket Writer 2, a Dictionary Disk 
containing 32,000 words (expandable to 40,000) is available. 
The costs 14.95 (U.S.). 

For those of you who hove already discovered the many 
benefits of owning Pocket software; we offer all registered 
owners an upgrade to Pocket 2 software for only $19.95 (U.S.) 
plus 3.00 (U.S.) shipping and handling! Available only by writing 
to Digital Solutions Inc. 



Pocket WrilM- 2 Word Processer 
In addMian te Hie new leohires 
above... 

Spelling Checker incorporoled in progrom 

(requires a dicHonnry disk) 
Spelling Checker now run*, over 3009o 

faster than in original Pocket soflware 
Word wrap is now fully automolict 
Ability to move columns 
Go To poge riumber for finding informa. 

tion in long textit 
Fully outomotic upper and lower caw type 

COnversiont 
Enhanced Delete process for woid, line 

or paragraph 
Word Count feature for essays ond 

assignmentst 
Enhanced split rTiemory mail merge option 

PockBlPhinn«r2 Sproodsheel 
In additan lo liw new feoliiret 
above... 

Individual column width selection now 

availoblet 
Multiple files in memory with cut ond 

paste capability 

Serious Software 
That's Simple to Use 



Able !o print mathemalkol formulae as 

well as re^ulh oi cafculalionst 
Global iotmatWnQ opHon 
Enhanced row/column Insert deletef 
Logarithmic and XY graphing copobilitY ' 
Increased iWe comparability with oJher 

spreadsheets t 
Number o* row* incregsed *rom 99 

lo250t 

PodcetFilerS Dottibos* 
In oddMon to tfw new feulwrvs 
above... 

Dynamic calculations during data entry 
Intelligent re entry to entef/edit mode 
Easier file conversion irom other softwa re t 
Automatic index updating for conslantly 

sailed filet 
Enhanced mothemotkal longuage 

including loops and lobeht 
H+gh speed sort using dynomic bufferingt 
Automatic entry of repetotive dala t 

• Commodore's Microcompulecs 
Magazine, independent reviewers, roted 
the original Pocket Writer 128/64 orvd 
Pocket Planner 128/64 software the 
"Annual Best of 1986" in Ihe 
prc>ductivity category. 

Commodote A a legiilered frademork of 

CommwtOTC BjiinewMothine^ Int, 
TFealuics ovoiloble foi Commodore 64Tm. 
c ^9Rh D^ilnl Snhirton^ Inr. 



Superpolc: 

The Solution That 

Saves Money! 




Pocket Writer 2. Pocket Planner 2 and 

Pocket Filer 2 together 
Convenient; get all three integroted 

applicotionsat once 
128/64 so^twore on some disks 
Economical: S 179.85 (U.S.) worth of 

software ioi: only 

$99.95 (U.S.} 

Pocket Writer 
Dictionary 




Makes Spelf ing Checker foster and 

simpler to use 
More convenient than developing 

personal disk 
32,000 words ovoiloble 
Expandable to 40,000 words 



Ingram Canado Ltd. 
1-416-738 1700 
Mail orders: 

Crystal Compufoi Inc 

in Michigan t-517-22-. ■6i7 

oyfsido Midiiflon 1-800-245 73 36 



Internaiionat Distributor Enquiries to; 



Digital 
Solutions 



f/ Inc. 



2-30 Wertheim Court 
Richrtiond Hill, Ontario 
Conoda L4B 1B9 
Telephone(416) 731-8775 
Telex 06-964501 
Fox (416) 731-8915 





The Best 
Just Got Belter 



V 



It's Absolutely 
Shocking!!! 



After all these years, CMS Software Systems is still the only 
company providing professional quality accounting software for the 
complete line of Commodore business computers. 

Whether you own an 8032, 8096, SuperPET, B-1 28, C-64, or the new 
C-128, we have a professionally written, fully integrated Accounting System 
designed especially for you. 

Introduced in 1 979, the CMS Accounting System was the first 
Accounting System available for Commodore computers. Not satisfied with 
just being first, we have continued to update, expand, and improve until 
today, the CMS Accounting System is widely recognized as one of the 
finest Accounting Systems available for any computer. 



Now Available for the Commodore C-1 28 




General Ledger 



Accounts Receivable 



Billing 



• Accounts Payable 



Job Costing 



Payroll 



$179.95 

Complete Price 

For more information see your 
Commodore dealer or cati 
Cathy York at21 4/289-0677. 



CMS Software Systems, Inc. • 2204 Camp David • Mesquite, TX 751 49 



VOLUME 8, NUMBER 3 



COnTEIITS 



comm 




MARCH 1987 




DEPARTMENTS 



LETTERS 



NEWS 



BOOK REVIEWS 



Border Patrol by R Haoid cxoid 
Vertical Bar Charting by Roh l Miiier 
Dynamic Error Trop by Kennetti Demlskm 
SX-64 Renumber by Tm Bfown 

AMIGA UPDATE 



AmigaBASIC Tutorial by Tim jones 
ADVENTURE ROAD 



Mapping Made Simple: Lobyrintti and Amnesia 

bySnoyMdoms 

64 USERS ONLY 



Letter Rigilt! by Kenny Lowson 

Addition Master by ion Adom 

ITM by Paul G Mulvoney. Ill 
CW Trainer by Teny M. Brewn 



■ II 



FEATURES 



fEUlCTRONlC MONEY 

\ THE ART OF B ANKING AT HOME 

tJust OS man swapped tiis saddle atop a tiorse lor the buclterseat of o 
Isports car, one day you may trade your checkbook for a keyboard. 
yGoyV. fields 




16 



From Commander Cody to ttie Perfect College 

by Matthew Leeds 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Connect! by Suzonne McCooch and Dan Sctiein 

Inside QuantumLink by Rooen w Baker 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

Defender of ttie Crown by Graham Klnsey 24 

Chessmaster 2000 by Ervm Bobo 26 

spitfire '40 bv Jell Se<ken 28 

Discovery by Ervln Bote 30 

Jet and Scenery Disks by John jetmoine 32 

The Big Blue Reader by Donald Maiweti 34 

Gnome Kit by Gary V. Fields 38 

Buyer's Guide to Mastertronic by Marx coione 40 
TIPS & TRICKS 

Hints for Fun and Utility compiled by Louis F Sander 46 

JIFFIES 



S4 
56 
58 
60 



80 



1 28 Machine La ng uage for Beginners by Bob Guena 1 2 
SILICON VALLEY INSIDER 



BIG NAME HUNTING 
IN AMERICA, 
PARTI 
h EXPLORING THE 
18 I LI CENSING JUNGLE 70 

20 L " 

" Licensing famous characters for 

Commodore sofhware is a growing 
trend. Here is a two-part look at 
» the licensing phenomenon. 

Dy Jonn jKriKiine 



LIGHTS... 
CAMERA... 
ACTION! 

COMMODORE COMPUTERS 
I IN HOLLYWOOD 74 

I See the many roles Commodore 
I- computers play behind the scenes In 
» the gtitz and glitter of Hollywood 

128 USERS ONLY 




62 



TUG by MofK Jordon 

Supersweep 128 by m Goromszegriv 
GAME PROGRAMS 



100 
104 



Conundmm by Richord F Daley and Sally J. Daley 

HOW TO ENTER PROGRAMS 



US 
120 



82 
88 
93 
96 



MAGAZINE ENTRY PROGRAM 



122 



USER GROUPS 



124 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



128 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 3 



LETTERS 




Ma^izine Entry Program 

To the Edittjr: 

While lounging ;ux)Lin(.l tliis evening 
and thumbing throiigli a back issue of 
Cotmnodore Magazine, 1 ran acn).ss an 
article of which 1 had not read closely be- 
fore. I am referring to tlie C>ctolx;r, 1986, 
issue of Comnux/orc iMagazinc, i>age 
118, tided How to lintcr Pn)gnuns. In 
reading this article, my eyes were tlniwn 
to the section cntiticd OLiT OV- DATA 
ERROR Tills made me tliink diat ma\be 
I could offer a suggestion to tlie fellow 
Commodore 64 programmers of the 
world 

In the article, it says "Reading data 
from a page of a magiizine am be a stniin 
on the brain, so use a ruler or a piece of 
paper or aiijlhing else to help you keep 
track of where you are as yon enter data." 
First, let me saj' that 1 liave had tlie 
same experiences with entering dat:i on 
my Commodore 64 and it c;ui Ixr a \er}' 
frustrating thing to say die lc"ist. My sug- 
gestion is to use a tape recorder — not 
one that is expensive, just cas\' to operate 
and with good clarit\'. What is in%'olvcxl is 
not difficult and at most about the .sjinie 
amount of time will be sjx'nt witli die re- 
corder as going back ;uid c(jrrecting mis- 
takes or finding tliem. Mere Ls a sm;ill pn)- 
gram off the top of my head to illustrate 
how it is done. 
10 PRIlNT-quotation-llEIP FOR FFWl-R 

MISTAKI-S-ciuotation-enter 
20 FOR-X-eciu:ils.ONH TO ONI' 'IIIOU- 

SAND-colon-NEXT-entcr 
30 PRINT-CHR-STRlNG-parenthesis- 
0^fE-FOUR-SEVEN-parcnd^csis-entc^ 
40 CT-EQUA15-ZERO-enter 
50 PRINT-quotation-HOW WONDER- 
FUL THIS IS-quotation-enter 
60 CT-EQUAIi^CT-PLUS-ONE 
70 IF-CT-IS-LESS-THAN-EIGHT-THEN- 
FlFTY-enter 
The hyphens have no real me;uiing 
other than pauses in your voice while re- 
cording the program. What is in all cap- 
ital letters is the actual program, while 
lower-case print is the S} mbol which is 
spoken into die recorder Sit down one 
night and speak the prognun into the re- 
corder and then die next d;u' .start the re- 
corder and type what ycui he:ir. Remem- 



ber to speak slowly enough to ensure 
that you will not fall behind wliile taping 
I tliink you will be impre-ssed \\'idi tlie re- 
sults, 

Micfxwl Wyatt 
Sheridan, Wyoming 



Game Port Tutorial 

To die l:ditor: 

1 read with much interest die Game 
Port Tutorial, Part 1 (Technical Tips in 
Septembcr/Octol^er, 1986). However, it 
ap[X"irs tliat diere is a problem widi List- 
ing 2 MtxIificatiorLS. In line 157, die sec- 
ond ix)ke, POKE S + 4, 33 was meant to 
select a sawtooth waveform and open 
the giite of voice 1 . This appears to be a 
problem ;ls tJien tlie gate would be strict- 
ly ojx;n all tlie time. App;irendy tlie gate 
needs to be closed and reopened each 
time the frequency command registers 
are changed. To make the SID output a 
tone, 1 removed the second poke fhim 
line 157 and put it on a line 216 POKE 
S + 4,3.3:POKE S + 4,32 dius closing die 
gate to wait for the next tone. This seems 
to fix the problem. 
RE Lyon 
Gnimuta Hills, California 

Disk Flipping 

To the Editor: 

In thejanuan', 1987, issn.ie, in Tips and 
Tricks, dicrc was an article called Disk 
Hipping by K;ithleen Mead. I would like 
to submit a much easier way to notch 
the disk — a method my son told me, 
which I have used for a few years. 

Using ;uiotlier disk ils a template, place 
it back to back widi tlie disk you wish to 
cut die otlier write protect notdi. C:ire 
should be taken diat both disks are in 
perfect alignment with eacli other Take 
an ordinary paper hole punch, one with 
aliout the hole size of notebook paper 
(Tliese arc available at most any place 
selling school or stationers' supplies for 
under S2.00.) Slide the punch in the 
notch of the template imtil the cutter 
jxwt touclies tlie inside portion of the 
template notch and centered. Cut the 
hole and you're in business with a double 
sided disk. Takes less than a minute. I 
have never experienced a feilure yet. 

Since 1 am retired and Living on a small 
pension, 1 ;im iilways looking for eas)- and 
inexpeasive ways of doing things. 
George A Rhoiids,Jr. 
Boring, Oregon 



STAFF 



Publisher 
Diane C. LeBold 

Assistanl to the Publisher 
Kelly McKeown 



Editor 
Carol Minton 

Technical Editor 
Jim Gracely 

West Coast Correspondsnl 
Matthew Leeds 



Art Director 
Gwenn Knapp 

Assistant Art Director 
Wilson Harp 

Production Assistant 
Bob Clark 

Cover Photo 
Bob Emmott 

Computer Graphics 
Wayne Schmidt 

Production Manager 
Jo-Ellen Temple 



Circulation 
Kenneth F. Battlsta 

Advertising Coordinator 
Becky Conon 



Advertising Representatives 

SOUTHEAST, SOUTHWEST AND WEST COAST 

Warren Longer, Spencer 0. Smith 

Warren Longer Associates 

9320 NW 2nd Street 

Coral Springs, FL 33071 

Advertising Inquiries Only 

305/753-4124 

MIDWEST, NORTHEAST AND CANADA 

Pamela Stockham 

700 River Road 

Fair Haven, NJ 07701 

201/741-5784 



Commodore Msgazine. Volume 8, Number 3, Marcii 
1987, ISBN 0-88731-067-2. 

Commodore Magazine (ISSN 0744-8724) is published 
monthly by Commodore Magazine Inc., 1200 Wilson 
Drive, West Chester. PA 19380. U.S.A. U.S. subscriber 
rate is S35.40 per year: Canadian subscriber rate is 
S45,4D per year; Overseas subscriber rate is S65.00 per 
year. Questions concerning subscnption should be di- 
rected to Commodore Magazine Subscription Depart- 
ment. Box 651, Holmes, Pennsylvania 19043- Phone 
(800) 345-81 12. In Pennsylvania (B00| 662-2444. Copy- 
rlgtit % 1986 by Commodore Magazine Inc. All rights 
resen/ed, 

CBM, VIC 20, and Commodore 64 are registered 
trademarks o( Commodore Electronics Ltd. Super PET 
and Commodore 128 are trademarks of Commodore 
Electronics Ltd. Amiga* is a registered trademark of 
Commodore-Amiga. PET" is a registered trademark of 
Commodore Business Machines, Inc. 

ABC Membership applied for. 



4 MARCH '87 



IF YOU (AN FIND A BETTER C64 
PROGRAM WE'LL BUY IT FOR YOU! 




WORD 



fflKllEK a &Tliesaunis 

• The most powerful, complete Word 
Processing System available for 
Commodore 64 computers. Includes: 

• An 85,000 Word Spell Checker and 

unlimited sub-dictionaries in which to 
enter your own words. 

• An Integrated Thesaurus with over 

60,000 synonyms. 

• An Integrated Outline Processor that 
quickly organizes notes, facis, and ideas. 

• On-Screen Highlighting shows under- 
lining , /fa//c and bold face in reverse 
video color. (In the Print Preview Mode, 
underlined text is displayed underlined.) 

• An 80-Column Print Preview Mode 

that allows you to view your document 
on screen in an 80-column format as it 
will appear in print - before you print it. 



With Timeworks you get more 
than software. . . 

You Get Our Customer Technical 
Support Team - free to all registered 
users. 



DtATA ^ ^^ 

MANAGER 2 &Label Maker 

• A general information storage and 
retrieval system with report writing, 
graphics, statistics, and label making 
capabflities. Plus, you get: 

• Quick access to important Informa- 
tion. Items can be easily retrieved and 
printed by name, index code, date 
range, amount range, or any category 
of information stored in the system. 

• Exclusive X-SEARCH, X-SORT, and 
X-CHART features that allow you to 
cross-search any category of informa- 
tion; sort items alphabetically, numeri- 
cally, or by date; break down statistical 
information into categories; and graphi- 
cally view your results. 




More power for your dollar 

Timeworks, Inc., 444 Lake Cook Road, 
Deerfield, Illinois 60015 312-948-9200 

■ Offer eipires 90 days after dale o( original piircHase. 
" COMMODORE is a regisiered Irademark of Commodore 
Eleclroriics. Ltd. 
tGEOS Is a trademartt of Bert<eley Software. Inc. 
C 1983 T)m«work«, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 



With Timeworks you get our Money 
Back Guarantee* 

If you can find anything that works better 
for you, we'll buy it for you. Details inside 
every Timeworks package. 

You Gef Our Liberal Upgrade and 
Exchange Policy - Details are inside 
every Timeworks package. 

For the Commodore 64/128" Computers 
(64K, 40 Column) 

Suggested Retail List Prices: 

WORD WRITER 3 -S49.95 
SWIFTCALC -$39.95 

DATA MAN AG ER 2 - 839.95 



SWIFTCALC .Hi Siileways 

• A powerful, easy-to-use electronic 
spreadsheet designed for home and 
business use. Plus, you get: 

• Sideways - Prints all your columns on 
one, continuous sheet . . . sideways. 

• 250 rows and 104 columns provide 
more than 25,000 cells (locations) in 
which to place information. 

• Performs mathematical functions, up 

to 12 digits. Allows the use of minimum 
and maximum values, averages, sums, 
integers, absolute values, and exponen- 
tial notation. 

• Performs financial analysis functions 

calculates the present and future value 
of a dollar and the present and future 
value of a constant amount (annuity). 



Available now at your favorite 
dealer, or call Timeworks. 

TO ORDER CALL: 
1-800-535-9497 




TCP- HOME OF THE HITS 



OPEN: 9am-8pm Mon-Frl, lOam-Spm Sat EAST COAST TIME 
NEW HRS STARTING MAR 01: 9am-8pm Mon-Thr, 9am-9pm Frl,10am-6pm Sat, Noon-6pm Sun 



GAME GALLERY 



Educational Software too! 

All Games stocked for quick ship!!! 



MISC CJAMHS 

Hotein SCALL 

Safloonlll t37.96 

Munjar by th« Dozgn SS4.9S 

ACCt-SS 

Beacn Head S24.95 

BeachHBBd2 S?9 95 

Loader BiMRl $29.96 

Lsader Boaril Toum. Di&k SI 6 95 

Tonlh Franw $27,95 

ACCOIAnE 

DamBusUI -.. $22-95 

Fiohlt*g« $22.95 

HaflBall $22-95 

UwolthflWBSl $22-95 

PSI S iradino m $22.95 

ACTrVKSlON 

Atajar $19.95 

BoriDwodTimfl $19.95 

Comp, Rrewks Ceiebrarn $i 9.9S 
Cowntqlown \o shutdown . . $19 95 
Fasi Tracks Slol Car Consi $19.95 
Ga/ry Kilchar's Gamartiakr $24.95 

GBA Basketball 2 on 2 $24.95 

Ghoabusttre $24.95 

GreaiAmar RR $24.95 

Hacker $19.95 

Hslwrll $24.95 

(amlhs64 $21.95 

Iam1hel26 $24,95 

Linn Comptvltr Psopla .-.-. $24 95 

Master 01 Lamps $1995 

Mindsfiadow $19.95 

On Courl TanrMS $21,95 

Pataiill Losi Caverns $19.95 

Space Shunle $19.95 

Star Rarik Bojiing $21.95 

ARTWOfLX 

Imarnatonal Hockey $1B95 

AVALON mix 

GullBnke K2.95 

Splllr»40 $24.95 

SupwtKml StirxJay $26.95 

TeamOiJklOfSS $16.95 

BRODERBUND 

Ciwnpsttp Lode Runner .. $24.95 

Karataka $19,95 

Lode Rjnner $24,95 

Music SIlDp $29,95 

BLUE CHIP 

Baron $24,95 

WHIonaite $24.95 

TyOKjn $24.95 

COMMODORE 

Sky Trawl $27.95 

DATA EAST 

CommarxSo „,.... $24.95 

Karate Ct^mp $26.95 

Kung Fu master $2€.9S 

K[>;c -IRONIC ARTS 

Aflvenlure Conslr $27.95 

Amnetia - $29.95 

Arehon 2 $27.95 

Artie Fm - $24 95 

Autudusl $37.95 

SailftTaJa $32.95 

BanfsTaieB $2995 

BattlelTDnt $29,95 

Camera 81 War $37 95 

Chessmataer 2CXXI $26 95 



EunipoAblaze $37 95 

Haro Hat Mack $13.95 

Lords ol Conque« $24,95 

Marble Madness $27.95 

Moebius $29.95 

MunJer Party $25 95 

Moviemaker $27.95 

Ogre $29.95 

Reach !or the Stars $32.95 

Robot Rascals $29.95 

SkyFo« - $24-95 

Software Golden Oictes -- $16.95 

aartteetl.. $32.95 

Tim Leary's Mir»d inttot ... $2495 

Touciylown FoabaK $22,95 

Ultima I.. .„ $29 95 

Ultima ni $37,95 

Ultima W $45,95 

EPYS 

Chamc>onship Wraslling , $27.95 

Movia Mof^ster $22 95 

Summer Games $2695 

Summer Games II $2695 

SuperCyde $29,95 

Temple Trilogy $29 95 

Winter Games $27,95 

WorU Games , ,. $29.95 

WorU's Greatest Baseball $24.95 
World's Graatest Football $2S.95 
World Karaio Cha $2295 

Call tor prices 

on 0lh« EPYK producn 1 

HREBIRD 

Elite $22 95 

Pawn $27-95 

INFOCOM 

Bailey Hoo $29.95 

Cut Throats $22.95 

DeadSne.,- $25.95 

Encfianter $25.95 

Hitchhiker's Guide $22.96 

Intdel $29.95 

Leatfier Goddasse* $24.95 

Moon Ma $24.95 

Planertail $25.95 

Sorcerer,. , $29.95 

SpellbmAer $29.95 

Suspect $29.95 

Trinrty , $32:95 

Wishbiingor $25.95 

Witness $25-95 

Zoriil $22 95 

Zorkll $26-95 

ZorVIII $26.95 

INVISICLUE BOOKS FOR 
ANY INFOCOM GAUE $6.95 

LANCE HAFNER 

Final Four Basketball $29 95 

Baskolljall. she Pro Game . $29 96 
.MrCKOLEACrK 
Microieague Baseball . .. $27.95 
Microleague general mgr $27.95 
hi^croleague 1 985 teams $15 95 
MICROPROSE 

Aaojel C4.95 

Cnisade in Europe $27.95 

Decision in the Desert $27,95 

F-1S Strike EsQle $2195 

Gunstip $CALL 

i::onlic1 in Vielnam $CALL 



Hellcat Acs $21.95 

Kennedy Approach $24.95 

NATO Commander $24.95 

Silent Service $24.95 

Solo Flight $24.95 

Spillire Ace $21.95 

Top Gunmen - SCALL 

MINT! SCAPE 

Bank Stfoel Music Wmor.. $27.35 

Bank Street Storybook $27.95 

Bop-n-Wrestte $21.95 

CaslleCloMwr $18.95 

Halley Project $27 95 

InOana Jones $22.95 

Indoor Spoils $22.95 

InMrator _. $21 95 

Quake minus one $17.95 

ShadowSre - $17.95 

Ported Score SAT prep .. $49.95 

The Lords ol Midnight $17.95 

Call for prices on 

other MINDSCAPE producls! 

tl/UlAKSOfT 

FtoydtheDnsd $19,95 

Maps USA $34.95 

Maps Europe $34.95 

World Maps $34.95 



.SIEHl{j\ 

Championstiip BoKing $17,95 

SIMON &.S}IfSTER 

Paper Airplane const $CALL 

JK Lassai's Income Tax ,... $39,95 

Kermifs Story Maker $19,95 

NY Times Crossword Puzzle 

Vol, 1 or 2 $14.95 

Spy Hunter $31.95 

Star Trek-Kobayashi ait. ... $29.95 

TypinO Tutor III $29.95 

SPECTFJUM H0LOBYT1-; 

Galo - $CALL 

Sl'IU.N'GBOARD 

EajlyGamM $2695 

Easy As $29,95 

Piece 01 Cake Math $26 95 

sif!i.o<;ic 

Flighi Simulator II $32,95 

Football $3795 

FS II Scenery disk $1595 

Jet $29 95 

Nigtit Mission Pinball $CALL 

Pure Stat Baseball $37-95 

Random Hous*. Spinnaker, 
and SSI producls In stockll' 
Call (or Price! 



( -lit UAr..\j!.v^h>; 

Bank Street Filer $34.95 

Consultant $39.95 

Data Manager $19.95 

Pocket Flier 64 _ $24,00 

PraSlo S4 $36.95 

C-« INTEGRATED PKGS 

Homepak $39.95 

Tno - $CALL 

Vizastar » $7995 

C-64 SPREADSHEETS 

Ca»ot $39 95 

Pccket Planner 64 $CALL 

Pranicalc(d| or (t) SCALL 

PS, Programble SpnJsh! - $19 95 
SwiTtcalc 64 w^srdeways - $39 95 

Sidways $19.95 

Vizastar 64 $79,95 

<:*) WOKD PRCK'ESSORH 

Bank Street Writer $CALL 

Bank Street Speller 534 95 

cm S PastelEOA) $12 95 

Fleet System II SCALL 

Font Master U $34 95 

Kid Pro Quo $32 95 

Paperdip $37 95 

Paperclip w/spellpack $49 95 

Pocket Wntor $CALL 

Pocket Wnter Dicltonary ... $19 95 

Spelpro64 $3295 

Trio $CALL 

WonJpra3w64 $1495 

WordPro 64 - -. $36 95 

WordpmGTS SCALL 

Wortj Wnter 6* w/speller , $34 95 
FINANCIAL & ACCT. 

CashOO" $3695 

Cent- Home Aoct $4695 



Picasso's Revenge w/pen $CALL 

Pnnt Shop $25 95 

Pnnt Shop Companion $24-95 

.MISC. HARDWARE 

Estes pwr supply lor C.64 $5495 

Nsverone 3 Slot expander $27.95 

uriLiTiES 

GT4 $22.95 

Copy II 64 $2400 

C Power $69 96 

GSM 1541 akgn $34.95 

Fast Load $24,95 

Mach 5 _ $24.95 

Mertn 64 $34.95 

Pal 64 $32.95 

Power 64 $32.95 

Toolboil64 $59.95 

Quest Stat manager $34 95 

Vorpal lasi loader SCALL 

Softsync Pars Acct $32.95 

Timeworks Eloclr. Checht* $19 95 
Timaworhs General Ledger, 
A/R.ArP. Payroll. Inviory ea $40.95 
Timeworks Money Mgr -$19 95 
<;R.A.i"HR:,S 

CADPIC ,™. ™ $32-95 

CIpArt I $19 95 

CipArlll $CALL 

Graphics Library I. It. or lit $1 6 95 
Newsroom $34,95 



FREE UGHT PEN 

w/purchase of Plcasio^s 
Revenge Pain ling Program 

$42,95 




ELECTRONIC ARTS'- 
CLASSICS <tH O QC 
ONSALEtll ^> I^.^Q EACH 

Racing Destr. Sot 
HeaM o1 Africa 
Super Bold'&r Dash 
Mall Oriler Monsters 
One on One 
Reitim el ImpcssiUe 



Archon 

M.U.L.E. 

Pinball Conitr.Set 

Sevtn Cilles of Gold 

Cut & Pasr* 

Music Construclion Set 

tCl 



To ordir by fnall: We aocept moniey order, 
conif lOd chock, cwrsonal check. Allow 2 waaks (or 
personal choch iDC^ar. 
Shtpplng; Sd OO (or software and accDSSories/ 
SI 00 fcr printers and cotor monitors/ £8 CO (or disk 
drives and other rromloi's/ Add S3 CO por box shipped 
COD Calllor othQ^r ^hipptnrjcha/ge^ AdcJilianal 
shipping laquiredonAPO. FPO. AK. HI. andtoreigrt 
Drd»rs. 

Ttrmt; ALU PRICES REFLECT CASH 
DISCOUNT, ADD Lfl-Ji FOR MASTERCARD 
OR VISA. Manjfaauref's warraiiy honored with 
copy Q( OUT invoce, ALL SALES ARE FINAL 
DelftCtitfA >eni$ tAplaced or repaired at our discretion. 
P^rin Sylvan i a tttidami. add 6% sales taic- Prices and 
t«rms s J3<,eci to chartge without rtotpce 



I Itlhroughsorrioov&isighiwedontha;'!) 
|he lowasi pries, wa w^jultt appreCiaia 
the opportunity to beat it H we can, yOu 
wi'l 96I the befiA'it ol our Federal 
Express shippJrtg on soTIwaire orderSi 
over ^50 00 

e Purchase orders, are accepted ItOfYi 
quB^if led corporiiT>ons and m&tituiion'^ 

I No sales ta* on orders mjlstde of PA 

I Buy with canlidonco Wehoriormanu* 
faclurers warranty. 

[ We accept Mastercard. Visa. COO and 
mailordi&rs. ^ ^^~y^^i ^^^^^ 



INFORMATION AND 

PA ORDERS 814-234-2236 



PRINTERS— 

^t . ^^^ 

a ' III I ^■^''•"■■"" 
i\ NX-10 

I p PRICE DROP TO 

y $214.95 

NX-IOC $CALL 

NX-15 $349.00 

NL-10C $CALL 

POWERTYPE, 5269.00 

16cps. daisywheel 




BROTHER 1509 

180 CPS DOT MATRIX PRINTER, 15" 

CARRIAGE, FRICTION AND TRACTOR 

FEED, 45 CPS NLO MODE, I, 3K BUFFER. 

USES EPSON FX PRINT CODES. 





Epson Printers \r""K*f 
LX-ee . «29.i» 

HOMEWniTER 10 $C*U 

Fx-85 _ taasM 

FX-I86 WALL 

HX.IOO (279,00 

DX-IO WALL 

HS.«a INKJET tCAU 



CLOSEOUT SPECIAL!!! 



EPSON 0X-1Q 
DASYWHEEL PRINTER 
HEW LOW PRICE 




eioop $CAt.L 

5510P includos color kit SCALL 

Printer Interfacas 

MW-350 w.'tOii Duner SCALL 

XETEC Superuraphll _ SCALL 

XETEC Supirgraphtx Jr „ S46.95 



PANASONIC 

2 YR WARRANTY 
ALL NEW PANASONIC PRINTERS 

NOW AVAILABLE!! 

Call for Price and Features ol: 
toaoi, 10911, and 10921 




TUSSEY COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



P.O. BOX 1006 

STATE COLLEGE. PA 16804 



CALL US FOR WHATS HOT! 



CALL TOLL FREE 



1-800-468-9044 



MONITORS ^^Hia 

COMPOSITE COLOR 

Call for Composite 
Color Monitors 

MONOCtlUOME 

ZENITH 12!0 1 3" ilatambsr $94,00 

ZENITH 1230 graan $94.00 

GOLDSTAR 1 S" mad resolution 

amber or green $79,95 

MAGNAVOX 8562 2 yr warranty 

monoctiroma irrode , ,,.,.,$259.95 

THOMPSON 3651 2VC mono rtiode 
separated video $249.9$ 

MODEMS ^^^^m 

VOLKS 64B0 sanjOObaua SCALL 

WESTRIDGE $49.95 

MESSENGER $42.95 

1660 SCALL 

MITEY MO _ , 459,95 

COMPUSERVE STR KIT ... $19.95 
PLAYNET STARTER KIT ... $14.95 



CMS 



General Acct System 

includes: * General Ledger 

• Accts Receivable • Billing 

Statements * Accts Payable 

• Check Writing • Job 

Costing • Payrall 

Plig. Pries for all Modules: 

C128 version $124.95 

CSJusrsion $119.96 



Fontmaster 128... SCALL 
Fontmaster 64 .... $34.95 



VIZASTAR & 
VIZAWRITE SPECIAL 

$29.95 



TCP leads (he way!" 



128 AND 64 

HAIiD DRIVES 

FROM JCT 

Plugi iniQ lh« dttk dtrvt porl jusl ii.^ 
\hm \B7\ la mucimtia com^\tiAty, 5 
fav wiiiinly on th* m«chaniC4] 
ponton d irw Hvd Driv4. I Yaai 
warrwuy on t\taioi\ia. imiTk^iA!t« 
i«pUc«mi«ntwi;Min 1 ytir 

MODELS AVAILABLE: 
JCTHWO,,3.7mb ....^ SCALL 

JCT1005,5mb ..„.$CALL 

JCT 1010, lOmh SCALL 

(ICAB than (H2B.00:il 
call for hctl price) 



INFO DESIGNS 

SALEII! 

GctkiaI Ledger. Accounu i'tyibte. 

Accounu RbHivtbh. Piymll, 

Invenmry. CofrmiunKUion Edjc 

Mtfitxcfnent £d|«. Necouuio^n Bdjc. 

at Woidpfo f'^W 

$19.95/EA 



PRINTER PACKAGES 

ALL PRINTERS INTERFACE WITH C-64 or 0128 

NX-io & XETEC SUPERGRAPHIX.... $279.95 
NX-10 & XETEC Supergraphix Jr $259.95 

PANASONIC 

CALL FOR PACKAGE PRICES ON NEW 
PAI^ASONIC PRINTERS AND INTERFACES 

SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000A& XETEC Supergraphix Jr. $229.95 

EPSON SCALL FOR 

mm Lx-ae & interface., lowest price 

WW DX-10 DAISYWHEEL & 

^ip^ XETEC Supergraphix Jr $219.95 

BROTHER 

1509 & XETEC SUPERGRAPHIX $419.00 



■^ 



SEIKOSHA 

2 YR WARRANTY 

SP-1 OOOVC SI 64.95 

SP-1000A or SP-1 0001 .. SI 99.00 



SUPERGRAPHIX 
Interface w^^k txjrier 
down loadable fonts 

SSSLOWEST PRICE 
SUPER GRAPHIX JR 
primer inlerfdce $46.95 



GEOS $39.95 

Fontpack I $CALL 

Call for other Berkely Software 




DISKS 

□er ijox of 10 
BONUS DISKS 
SSDD, , $7.45 

DS DO $7.9S 

MASHUA DISKS 
SS DD $8.95 

3S DO $9.45 

TUSSEY DISKS 
SS DO. . $8.45 

DS DD $8.95 

Call for Price on 
Verbalim and 
Maxell DIsksll 



Broderbund 

Brooertiund Prim Shop $25.95 
Pnnt Shop Companion $22.9S 
Graphics Lbrary 

I. n, or III S16.95 

120 s^iee! cokir paper refl 

-to e3ch red. bba. gold S6-95 

Certifcaite Maxer $32-95 

Thinhjng Cap „ „ $32.95 





lIlJLJunlsonVytarid 

Ptintmaslet S29.95 

Art Gallery SCALL 

SOLUTION 
UNLIMITED 

Icon Factory S29.95 

Billboard 

Maker $29.95 


CLOSEOUT 
SPECIAL!! 


/Vordpro 3 + /64 

$14.95 

while supply lasts 



COMMODORE 128: 

SOFTWARE 

For 128 in 

128 or CPM modes 

WOFID I'n(,K:E.S.SO[LS 
FLEET SYSTEM II w/spoll ... $47.95 
FLEET SYSTEM III $CALL 

w/speil & the&aunjs 

JANE $32,95 

PAPERCLIP II $CALL 

PERFECT WRR^R $CALL 

POCKET WRTtH 1 26 , , , $CALL 

SUPERSCRIPT 128 $59.95 

VIZAWRrTE 123 $CALL 

WORDPRO 128 $59.95 

WORDPRO 126Sw/SfWll.... $CALL 
W-[}WRITER I2aw/spell $49.95 

.'-"pRf:\nsnELTS 

EPYX MULTIPLAN $39.95 

PERFECT CALC SCALL 

POCKET PLANNER 1 28 $CALL 
SWIFTCALC 1 28 w/sdways,. $49.95 

DATA RA-SES 

CONSULTANT $39.95 

DATE MANAGER 128 $CALL 

PERFECT FILER $CALL 

POCKET FILER 1 28 $CALL 

PROFILE 128 $59.95 

SUPERBASE12S $CAa 

MISC. 128 SOFTWARE 

A Mind Forever Voyaging .... $26.95 

BUDDY 12B assamliler $42.95 

C POWER (ram Proline $59.95 

DESK MANAGER 128 $34.95 

lamlheC126 $24.95 

VIZASTAR 128 $CALL 

MACH 123 $39.95 

MATRIX Irom Prog.Perlpli ... $47.95 

PARTNER 128 $54.95 

PERSONAL ACCT 126 $34.95 

SYLVIA PORTER'S porMnal 
finance planner $54.95 



ALL COMMODORE PRODUCTS 
ON SALE NOW!! 



AMIGA PACKAGES SCALL 

Atl^lGA EXTERNAL FLOPPY $CALL 

1670 MODEM $124.95 

1350 MOUSE $39.95 

C128 COMPUTER SNEVER LOWER 

1571 DISK DRIVE SCALL 

1902A SLOWEST PRICE EVER 

1750 RAM EXPANSION $CALU,, 

COMMODORI-^^r^ 
128t ^ 




1571 DISK DRIVE 
Magnovox8562, or 
Thompson 36512 VC, 
or Commoijore 1 902A 
RGB/Composite Monitor^ 

■I ^CALL FOR PACKAGE PRICE 



COMMODORE 




ONLY $169.95 

Includes GEOS A Ouanlrum Link 

1541 C DISK DRIVE SCALL 

1802C MONITOR SCALL 



Software orders over $50.00 will be 
shipped FEDERAL EXPRESS (yes, even 
with these prices) 



You only pay TCP's siandard 
stiipping ctiarge of S4 00 per order 
Tills cMer also valid on peripherals 
and accessones under 8 pounds 
Ofders arriving before 1 1 00 AM our 
lime will be shipped oul same day " 




Computerized order entry, processing 
and Status allow TCP to serve you 
faster and better! 




CALL TOLL FREE f -800-468-9044 




INTRODUCING... 

Four ways to address 
your software needs. 



One's Really Simple, 

Fleet System 2™ is so user friendly beginners can 

start t\ping documents 

in minutes! The 

integrated 90.000 word 

dictionar}' is the largest 

and fastest available on 

the Commodore 64. 

And you can even add 
an additional 10,000 
"Oisrom" words to 
the dictionary-. 

Suggested Retail Price: 

S59.95 



Fleet System 3' 

Fbr jmir Comoudart 138 



One's Really Integrated. 

Fleet System $" the user friendly software package 

for the Commodore 128 
includes an integrated 
90,000 word dictionary, 
On -Screen Help 
Windows, a "Preview" 
function so "What You 
See Is What You Get". 
There's also an integra- 
ted Thesaurus chat 
pro\ides thousands of 
s-jTionyms and antonyms 
and will help improve 
>'our writing and vo- 
cabulan* skills instantly! 
Suggested Retail Price: 
$69.95 

One's a 
Creator. 

Fleet Filer'" can create 
anything from invitations 
to mailing lists. You have 
up to 5,000 records 
which can be sorted in 
ascending or decending 
order. You can e\'en 
search according to 
logical criteria or search 
string. And we've saved 
the best for last... You 
can input and output to 
Fleet System 2", 3'", and 4" files. (And with most 
major word processors). Meet Filer"' will work on 
Commodore 64/128 computers. 

Suggested Retail Price: S39.95 

Finally, software the way it ought to be. 

Buy it and experience what over a quarter of a million Commodore users already believe in. 



One's the 
Ultimate. 

Fleet System 4'" is our 
all new ultimate, 
integrated writing tool 
that works on the 
Commodore 1 28 and 
combines four powerful 
applications into one 
package. It has every- 
thing you'd find in 
Fleet System 3" plus 
Fleet Filer'", the 
databa.se that puts 
information at your fingertips, in seconds! 

Suggested Retail Price: 879-95 





&.PSI 



CALL 1-800-343-4074 for the Dealer nearest you! 

Professional Software, Inc. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 

5 1 FreraonI Street, Needham, .MA 02 1 9-» ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^* 

(617)444-5224 



Fleet SvMcm.s 2. 3. 4 and Ficrt hicr ire JcMKncil ifwl ft-ndcn hy Viwonlnjnici Group Int. — tjjmnKHkirc (>4 ajid 1 2H are trd4k-litark.s <>f r.urtimodurc Eleaninio lid. Some nrinlen, 
may no[ support <:enain Fleet Sy^tcm^ 2. i. ^ of Filef funtlllln.^ and. or require and RtjB molliliir Weasc theek with «>ur dealer l>caler and Di.s(nbuttjr inquires art* icviteu. 



COMMODORE'S 



Take the Chore 

out of Weekly Groceiy 

Shopping 

XVledzLk Company has released Shopping list for the Comniodore 
64. Shopping List is menu-driven and features 21 "aisles" which 
allow users to select the names and quantity of items they want to 
purchase. When the shopper is finished making selections, the 
printer prints out the results. The program also has a place for users 
to indicate the items they have coupons for. 

Shopping List includes vrell over 800 of the most popular grocery 
store items. Also included are two special "aisles" that let users enter 
their own item names. The first is a "main course" aisle for the 
names of up to SOO favorite main course dishes. The other is an 
"extra" aisle for the names of special items not already found in one 
of the other 19 aisles. 

Shopping List retails for $29.95 from Kledzik Company, 2S60S 
Cielo Court, Valencia, CA 91355 (805-254-4720). 



Aliens 

VV ith Activision's Aliens: The Computer Game, Commodore 64 
users can live the thriller that has terrified more than 25 million 
movie-goers since Aliens was released by Twentieth Century Fox in 
the summer of 1986. 

Aliens: The Computer Game recreates all of the elements that 
made the motion picture such a success. After your harrowing flight 
to the surface of LV-426, aUen attackers come at you from the dark 
pathways of the Atmosphere Processor through the breached 
Operations Room to the fmal confrontation vrith the Alien Queen. 

Simulating the movie's struggle against manktad's ultimate foe, 
the game features six game segments which tie closely to the movie's 
storyline and action. 

Aliens: The Computer Game was created hy a team of designers 
leadhy Steve Cartwright, creator of Hacker and Hacker n. The 
game retails for S34.95 from Activision, 2350 Bayshore Parkway, 
Mountain View, CA 94043 (415-960-0410). 



Wargame Construction 



NEWS 



FROM THE FRONT 



s 



trategic Simulations has released Wargame Construction Set 

for the Commodore 64, a game that lets players create war, science 
fiction and fantasy games. 

Weapons and firepower, fighting units and troop movement are 
just some of the elements players can control. Gamers also have 
control over terrain, including scale and placement of roads, rivers, 
bridges, woods, bmldings and mines. A tutorial is included for the 
novice. 

The game offers eight pre-designed scenarios. These include battles 
fi?om the CivU War and World War II, a contemporary hostage rescue, 
a flaturistic battle with alien forces, a medieval castle seige, and a 



World War III batOe in Germany. Wargame 
Construction Set retails for S29,95 from 

Strategic Simulations, 1046 N, Rengstorff Avenue, Mountain View, 

CA 94043 (415-964-1353). 

Dr. Ruth's Game 
of Good Sex 

jQ-fter years of dispensing good advice about sexuaUty on the 
airwaves. Dr. Ruth Westheiraer is bringing her unique blend of 
candor, humor and common-sense practicality to the Commodore 64 
in Avalon Hill Game Company's Dr. Ruth's Computer Game of 
Good Sex, 

In the game, one to seven people answer questions about love, 
relationships and (of course) good sex. Successfiil answers score 
points and allow the player to advance to the bonus round called the 
Sex Clinic. There the player hears an actual case history as told to 
Dr. Buth and must choose the correct answer from four possible 
responses. The game contains over 800 questions and features a 
variable time clock (for handicapping better players) and a high 
score table. 

Dr. Ruth's Computer Game of Good Sex retaUs for $29.95 from 
Avalon HUl Game Company, 4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 
21214(301-254-5300). 



Volleyball 

A, 



i-rtworx Software has released Beach Ball Volleyball for the 
Commodore 64. Players match their skills against a friend or the 
computer at any of nine difiiculty levels. The game retails for S 14.95 
from Artworx Software, 150 North Main Street, Fairport, M 14450 
(?16-425-2833). 



S 



Maker Library 



pringboard has released Certificate Library Volume 1, a 
companion program to Springboard's Certificate Maker. 
Certificate Maker lets users create and print personalized 
certificates and awards with a Commodore 64. 

Certificate Library Volume 1 provides more than 100 new pre- 
designed certificates and awards. It also features 24 nevr borders to 
frame certificates and six dozen new seals and stickers. 

Certificate Maker is required to run Certificate Library 
Volume 1, which retaUs for S34.95 from Springboard Software, 
7808 Creekridge Circle, Minneapohs, MN 55435 (612-944-3915). 



Greeting Card Maker 

xiotivision's Greeting Card Maker creates cards, invitations and 
announcements for any occasion with a Commodore 64 and printer. 
It features six different size cards, including three-dimensional pop- 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 9 



COMMODORE'S 



up cards; pictures, designs, clip-art objects and 

panoramic scenes; two dozen background pat 

terns and borders; eight type styles, each in upper- and lower-case; 

and a variety of verses for any occasion. 

It also includes an envelope maker, address List and card rack. 
Packed with the program are 20 sheets of ivory parchment 
stationery, instructions for ordering additional stationeiy, and a 
comprehensive manual. 

Greeting Card Maker is available for S34.95 from Activislon, 
8350 Bayshore Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043 (415-960-0410). 

Choose the 
Perfect College 



NEWS 



FROM THE FRONT 



M. 



indscape has released The Perfect College for the Commodore 
64, a database containing information on more than 1,650 
accredited four-year U.S. colleges and universities. Choose up to 26 
26 college selection criteria such as cost, location, majors, overall 
competitiveness, and student/faculty ratio. 

The database includes over 440,000 facts to help identic the 
schools and annual updates insure that the information is current. 
The program also gives addresses and phone numbers. 

The Perfect College retaOs for $19.95 and is free with the 
purchase of Mindscape's The Perfect Score. (Mindscape, 3444 
Dundee Road, Northbrook, IL 60062, 312-480-7667). 



Bookkeeping Made Easy By. . . 

THE ACCOUNTANT' 

KFS's Preferred* Accounting System 
Written Exclusively for Commodore 128™ 

ONE PROGRAM DOES IT ALL! 

(No more disk swappinglll) 



FEATURES INCWDE: 

• General Ledger 

• General Journal 

• Check Regtsrer 

• Over 20 Reports Automatically 

• Payroll Computation & Write'Up 

• Payroll Check Writing 

• W-2 Printing 

• Quarterly Report 

• Accounts Rtcciv^le "Filing S\«em'* 

• Customer Billings 

• Accounts Payiiblc "Filing System" 



BASIC PACKAGE 
1499* 

IRS Acceptable 
Double Entry 
Accounting System 



Integrated Packages Now Available! 

— ProfesstonaL Cliettt Billing 

—Restaurant Accounting 
ft^^^^Q.S —Construction Accounting 

^9Sr each —Retail Sales and Inventory 

— Service Invoicing 

* "Crmxmodore's Murrocomputers Magazine, Independent Rivieuiers, 
Rated THE ACCOUNTANT^" -il in Preference- 
foT Commodore 12S"'' Productivity" 
KFS Softw-are, Inc. Sample Available 

1301 Seminole Blvd. #117 $9.95 PREPAID 

Laigo, Florida 33540 For C.O.D. Orders Phone: 

(813) 584-2355 
(PL Residents add 5% Sales Tax) 
(All figures in U.S. Dollars) 



Computer 
Maintenance 



X hilips EC6 has released the Computer Care Kit, a special Mt that 
contains everything needed to properly clean and maintain your 
computer, Included are PHI 700 Computer Anti-Static Spray, PH1800 
Computer Glass and Enclosure Cleaner, and PHllOO Jet Air Cleaner, 
There are also Lint Free Cleaning Swa^s, Lint Free Wipes, Floppy 
Head Disk Cleaners and presaturated Computer Terminal Screen 
Cleaner Pads. 

The kit is available for $39.95 from Phihps EGG, P.O. Box 3277, 
WUliamsport, PA 17701. C.O.D. is available by calling toD-free 
800.233-8767 (in PA 800-222-9308). 



Over 20 Free Programs 



Xlt 



Lttention all programmers! Watch for the next issue of 
Commodore Magazine— an entire issue of free programs— both 
games and practical applications— you can type in and use right 
away. Don't miss it! 



Tax Program Update 

J. ake a load off your shoulders this year by letting your computer 

help with your 1986 taxes. 

1986 Tax Beturn Helper KSoft C64 

845 Wellner Road 

NapervUle, IL 60B40 

312-961-1250 



Tax Master 


Master Software 
eHilleiyCourt 
Randallstown,MD 21133 
301-922-2962 


C64 


Tax Command 


Practical Programs 
80x93104 
Milwaukee, WI 53203 
414-272-7227 


C64 


Taxaid 


Taxaid Software 


C64 




606 Second Avenue SE 


C128 




Two Harbors, MK 55616 


Plus/4 




218-634-5012 


VIC20 




218-834-3600 




And to get a head start 


on your 1987 and 1988 taxes- 




Future Tax 


Taxaid Software 


C64 




606 Second Avenue SE 


C128 




Two Harbors, MN 55616 


Plus/4 




218-834-5012 






318-834-3600 





10 MARCH '87 



Fly to Florida! 



Scenery Disk # 7 covers the entire East Coast area from 
Philadelphia to Miami. The Florida coastline, fronn Cape 
Canaveral to Miami, is perfect for concentrated sight-seeing. Or 
fly to Washington DC, where scenery details include the Capitol 
Building, Pentagon, and Washington Monument. Whether seek- 
ing the intellectual challenge of Flight Simulator or the brute- 
force fun of Jet, you'll find this latest evolution of SubLOGIC 
scenery absolutely breath-taking! 




Scenery Disks now available: 



Areas 1-7 

San Francisco 'STAR' 

Central Japan 



See your dealer. SubLOGIC Scenery Disks are available in- 
dividually for $1 9.95. The six-disk Western U.S. set is available 
for $99.95. For additional product ordering information or the 
name of the dealer nearest you, call 



LDGIC 



713 Edg«biook Qtiv 
Champalsn IL 0i1fl2O 
(2trin»-eM}T«^i: ZOOMS 

ORDER LINE: (BOO) 637-4963 
Open 7 AM ^o 9 PM Csnlrat Tima 





BOOK REVIEWS 



REVIEWED ISY BOB GlIERRA 



128 Machine 
Language for 
Beginners 

Auflior: Rich;ird M;uxsficld 
Publisher: C.OMPiri-;! Books 

Box 5406 

Greensboro, NC 27403 
Price: SI 6.95 



XL\'en if yoLi don't know ;ui accumula- 
tor fiom a stttiis register, Richard Mans- 
field's 128Macbi)K' Language for Be^hi- 
iK'is can help )oii eonverac widi your 
CommcKlore 128 in machine huiguajic. 
iUtJiougli otlier Ixxjks on macliine l:ui- 
guagc have been written for the begin- 
ner, tliis is currently die only beginner 
btxik aimed directly at die 128 user. It 
teaches everydiing yt)u need to know to 
write 8502 machine code and covers 
such 1 28-speeific topics ;ls die machine's 
built-in machine-language monitor, as 
well as special escape sequences and ker- 
na] subroutines \^iiich can be incorporat- 
ed into your own jirognuns. 

All you need to get stiirted is a working 
knowledge of BASIC and several hours to 
type in the LADS iLssembler program. 
The IADS assembler Ls a label-based pni- 
graniming language diat com^erts lils-)'- 
to-remember mnemonic instructions 
( such as LDA for load accumulator ) into 
machine code tliat your computer c;ui 
understand. Tlie :issembler is needed to 
t\pe in tlic book's exiuiiple routines. 

Before you c;m t)ix' IADS into your 
1 28, however, you'll lia\e to enter MI,X. 
a BASIC program tliat eliminates r\ping 
errors when entering IADS. Even before 
t\ping MIJC, diougli, you may w;int to 
enter a short progr;mi called Automatic 
PnK)freader tliat cim m:ike die t> ping of 
MIJ^ go a lot snuKJtlier. On die odier 
li;md, you may decide to skip the t>ping 
altogether and send SI 2.95 to COM- 
PI;TE! for tlic IADS companion disk diat 
contitins not only die as,sembler, but sev- 
enil of die lxx)k's siunple machine-lan- 
guage programs as well. 

Once you've acquired a working cop>' 
of IADS, you can now begin. Mcr a short 
preface describing die uses of machine- 
language programming and its advan- 
tages over BASIC, the first couple of 
chapters explain how to use the book to- 



This book is currently 
the only beginner book 
unitten exclusively for 
128 users. 



getlier witli die LADS as.sembler. Also in- 
cluded is a discussion of numbering sys- 
tems :uid die relationships ;uiiong binan-, 
hex and decim;d. 

Chapter diree is :ui in-dcpt!i look at 
the 128's built-in machine-language 
monitor ;uid explains in simple temis the 
ftinctions of 16 .special monitor coni- 
miuids. A diorougli tliscu.ssion of dis;LS- 
-sembly shows )ou how to u.se die moni- 
tor as a debugging tooL A short disiisscm- 
bly of a machine-language prognuii con- 
taining a couple of bugs is inclutled, and 
by finding die errors, you begin to get a 
feel for tiie wa)- macliine-kuiguage pro- 
grams are constructed. You are simulta- 
neously intrixluced to the h:i7;irds of get- 
ting addressing modes mixed up. 

Chapter four deals exclLisi\el\' with 
tlie 8502's 1,-^ addressing ukkIcs. Insteatl 
of covering ever)' t)pe of addressing in 
depth, hov\'ever, M;uisfield sorts out die 
most significant modes. As a result, only 
tlie SL\ most tusefiil modes ;ire descril>ed 
in detail. ;uid die reader is encouraged to 
become more familiar with these by 
practicing diem. 

Tliis mednxl of selective instruction is 
used again in die fifth chapter, which 
concerns macliine-hmguage iiridimetic. 
In die ^ery first piiragraph. Mjuisfield ex- 
plains diat iildiougli machine l;uiguage is 
useful for mrniy applications, advanced 
matheniatics isn't one of them. He fur- 
ther suggests tliat an)' progr:ims invoh- 
ing trigonometiy or qiiatlratic ecjuations 
should be written in BASICS. As a result, 
die cliapter covers addition, subtraction 
and coniparist)n of numbers, as weU as 
the way )'Our 128 interprets numbers 
;uid tells tlie difference between num- 
bers representing instructions and those 
nie:mt :is actiud values. 

Similarly, chapter six covers the 8502's 
instruction .set ;uid mentions most of die 
56 a\'ailable comm;uids. but only die .^0 
most widely used instructions are dis- 
ciis,sed at lengdi. 'Iliese ;ire con\'eniendy 
divided into six groups according to die 
functions diey [Xirfbrm. Arranged in tills 



manner, the chapter not only makes 
leiiming tlie use of each cominimd e;isier, 
but al.so serves as a handy reference 
guide for die beginning progr:uiimer. 

Chapter se\'cn deals witli die \\'a)'s in 
which your machine-language programs 
can bomw from BASIC' by using the 
computer's built-in subroutines. Here 
MiULsfield ]X)ints out die atlviuitages of 
not ha\ing to ren'rite complex rtjutines. 
But he doe"s warn that progr;mis that bor- 
row heavily from tiicir computer's RO.M 
operating system c;in't be easih- tnmslat- 
ed tor odier computers. 

B)' die eiglidi chapter )'ou'll Ixr read)' 
to combine what you'^'e Iciimed to con- 
stnict a simple machine-language pro- 
gr;im diat c;ui search dirougli .selected 
areas of memon' tor .specific strings. Be- 
sides die prognun listing ;uid ;ui cxplana- 
don of die logic beliind its construction, 
the chapter also includes a di.scussion on 
"safe" sections of mctnor)- u'herc you can 
store )'Our machine-language programs. 

Perhaps die best chapter in die Ixwk, 
at least from a beginner's st:mdix)int, is 
the ninth — Machine Umguage Equiv- 
alents of BASIC Commands. Here Mans- 
field .shows )Oii simple -ways of duplicat- 
ing the functions of BASIC ke\'words 
sucli as INPIJ r. PRIKL :uid TAB, as well as 
more complex BASIC constructions like 
FOR-NEXT loops, IF-THEN conditional 
statements, and ON-GOTO. Althougli 
there are often sc\eral wa)S of duplicat- 
ing the siuiie BASIC function, die rou- 
tines provided are eas")- to understand 
and progr.mi. 

After a slioii chapter specificiilly about 
the 128's ,special fcamres (escape codes, 
nicmor)' banks, F,\ST mode), the final 
diapter expkiins how to u.se niiiii)' of die 
computer's built-in kern;d routines tor 
things like input/output operations, 
printing, customizing flinction keys, and 
s"witc!iing to 64 mtxie. 'lliis is followed 
b)' se\'en appendices, which Include a 
complete retiLTcnce guide tor die 8502 
instruction set, detailed expUiiiiitioas of 
how to use the LADS assenibler. die 1 28 
menioPi' map, a half-dozen u.sefiil ma- 
chine- kuiguage subrtxitines for mani]xi- 
lating numbers, :uid a ILst of (.;oninKKiore 
ASCU codes. 

The bcxik gives the beginner even'- 
thing he needs to prognun in machine 
language. I only hope diat M;msfield v^'ill 
write a sequel tor tliose of us who are inter- 
ested in a chapter or two on uses of ma- 
chine language in sound and grapliics! Q 



12 MARCH '87 



NUMBER ONE ARCADE HITS 



UMBEf 


i^^^^l 






A 


W^ 






/> 








m 




Put on your black belt and challenge your 
friends or the computer through nine 
picturesque settings in this leading Martial 
Arts Game to become the KARATE 
CHAMP. For the Commodore 64-/128 
and the 48K Apple II " Series. 



As the crack shot COMMANDO,' battle 
overwhelming odds to defeat advancing 
rebel forces. Armed with only a machine 
gun and hand grenades, you must break 
through the enemy lines to reach the fort- 
ress. For the Commodore 64'"/! 28. 



Prepare for the fight of your life . . . you 
are the KUNG-FU MASTER." ■ Battle the 
evil forces through the five dangerous 
floors In the wizard's castle to rescue the 
captive fair maiden. For the Commodore 
6471 28 and the 4BK Apple II * Series. 



Apple and Cammodore 54 are trademarks of Apple Com- 
puter, Inc. and Commodore Electronics, Ltd. respectively. 
• c Data East USA, Inc. Mfd. under license from Capcom 
USA. 
* * c Irem Corp. Mfd. under license by Data East USA, Inc. 



DATA EAST USA, INC. 

470 Needles Drive, San Jose, California 951 J2 

|408( 286-7074 

<: 1986 Data East USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 






n 




In a market full of helicopter simulations like Super Huey II, Gunship, and Infiltrator, it's nice 
to find a product like ThunderChopper that flies high above the rest! 



Colonel Jack Rosenow USAF (Ret.), 
President of AclionSoft Corp., has the 
experience to provide all of the 
helicopter action and strategy you've 
been looking for! ThunderChopper in- 
corporates the most advanced 
graphics, flight systems, and game- 
playing factors to provide a sensational 
balance of strategy and fun: 




Action-packed animated graphics 
include real 3D scenery and airborne 
threats. The competition's graphics 
just don't compare. 

A sophisticated instrument panel lets 
you scan all vital information at a 
glance whether performing combat, 
exploration or rescue operations. 
ThunderChopper's advanced 
instrumentation includes Fonward- 
Looking Infra red, 002 laser radar, 
zoom television, and ECM. 
Armament Includes TOW and 
Stinger missiles, a Hughes Chain 
Gun, and Zuni rockets. 

Better program and documentation 
design gets you up flying exciting 
combat missions in minutes. 




m 



^m^^m 



As Colonel Jack says: 
"ThunderChopper is the ultimate in 
helicopter action and realism. Nothing 
else even comes close. No other 
simulation can boast this much fun!" 





graphic ted 



Up Periscope! 

The new state of the art in submarine 
simulation. The superior strategic play 
action and 3D animated graphics of this 
simulation put it generations ahead of 
the pack. 

See Your Dealer... 

Or write or call us for more information. 
ThunderChopper and Up Periscope! 
are available on disk for the Commo- 
dore 64/128, Apple II, and IBM PC line 
of personal computers for the 
suggested retail price of $29.95. For 
direct orders please specify which 
computer version you want. Include 
$2.00 for shipping and specify UPS or 
first class mail delivery. Visa, Master- 
Card, American Express, and Diners 
Club cards accepted. 




- $29.95 - 
Better Engineering at a Better 
Price 



■ 1986 AclionSoft Corporauon 

3D Graphics and special eflecls courtesy 

SubLOGIC Corp, 

Commodore 64 and Commodore 128 are 

Iradematks of Commodore Electronics Ltd. 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc. 

IBM is a regislered trademark of International 

Business fi/lachines Corp. 



AmiimSoft' 

GENERATIONS AHEAD tu STRATEGY ACT«ON SOFTWARE 



122-4 S.RACE ST URBANA.tL 61801 
(217) 367-1024 








SILICON 



VALLEY 



INSIDER 



BY MATTHEW LEEDS 



From 

Commander 
Cody to the 
Perfect 
College 

Previews of new products 
from Silicon Valley. 

Xtlookedlike any other package. UPS had de- 
livered it with no special care. It wasn't until I 
opened it that I fcfund the note and the caje- 
fbUy wrapped sticks of TNT connected tx) a 
timer. Uh-oh. . . what stoiy had I leaked too 
soon? This definitely had my attention. 

What I found was a press release from 
Accolade, announcing a new software game, 
Killed Until Dead, for the Commodore 64. It 
is billed as the first truty interactive text and 
graphics murder mystery game, featuring 
over 20 plots. In this game, the player tries to 
prevent a murder instead of solve one. An un- 
usual concept and an unusual press kit! 
(PS.— it was not real TNT.) 

Accolade is also working on a football game 
for the 64. I'll have more details next month. 

Acttvision is upgrading Mimic Studio for 
the Amigi The upgrade Includes the atoihty to 
convert Music Studio-format scores into IFF 
SMUS files, used by most other music pro- 
grams on the Amiga. This conversion does 
not move the instruments, just the score in- 
formation. It also allows the use of SMDS files 
In Music Studio. 




The new version also uses IFF-digltized in- 
strument files, along with the internal syn- 
thesized instrument files, allowing the cre- 
ation of a song that uses digitized instru- 
ments, synthesized instruments, and MIDI 
instruments simultaneously. Other additions 
Include the use of aU Workbench printer driv- 
ers, and support for version 12 of the operat- 
ing gystem. The upgrade will be availahle to 
all Music Studio owners ty sending m their 
original disk and ten dollars. 

Electronic Arts continues to produce an 
incredible volume of software for Commodore 
owners. Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future is a 
return to those comic book heros of the past. 
Although it win not wia any awards for state- 
of-the-art programming, it is a funny presen- 
tation of fifties nostalgia; Dan Dare is a retired 
hero called back into action to stop the evU 
Mekon empire from destroying the earth. Im- 
ported from England, this game is the first of 
a new line of low-cost software being intro- 
duced by Electronic Arts. 



tMier goodies for the 64 coming in the next 
few months include Instant Music, Sky 
Jta n, Star Pox (an outer space shoot'em- 
up) and Pegasus, a project being worked on 
in conjunction with Lucasfihn. 

Electronic Arts has not forgotten the 
Amiga. Quick 1j^ is a typing tutor with a 
twist It's got aU the features you would ex- 
pect: great color graphs that give detail on ev- 
eiy aspect of your typing skills, an arcade 
game for quick reflexes, and customizing ca- 
pabihties to ensure that you work on your 
weak areas. But the twist is that as you type 
along with the text displayed on the screen, 
you're following the episodes of a soap opera. 
Guaranteed to hold your interest 

It's Only Eock and Roll is an Instant 
Music data disk with 40 new songs and al- 
most 20 new instruments. The manual will 
have a discography on the important eras in 
Rock, chord progressions for every song on 
the disk, and tips on arrangement, orchestra- 
tion and jamming. 

The Deluxe Video "Post Production 
Kit" is a Deluxe Video data disk with new 
scene generators, new sounds and music, and 
other goodies guaranteed to give the video- 
phjle hunger pains. Of even more interest is 
the news that a revision of Deluxe Video is 
in the works. It will address many of the user- 
requested additions to the program. 

The new version wfll feature 320 X 400 
mode operations for interlaced output, hard 
disk and extended memoiy compatibility, 12 
operating system compatibility, and smooth- 
er movement of objects and text on the 
screen. Lai-ge portions of the code have been 
rewritten in assembly language to speed 
things up, and the overall performance is 
much improved Electronic Arts has said that 

Continued on pg. 126 



16 MARCH '87 



WEHESELUNG 

THE ONE THING 

WECOUNTON 



Running a software company 
is no picnic. We have to do major 
calculations every day. Things 
like payables and receivables. 
Taxes. Budgets. And lord only 
knows how many quarterly 
cost projections. 

That's why we de\«ioped 
geoCalc. The spreadsheet 
program for GEOS -equipped 
Commodores. 

You see, we not only sell 
software for Commodores, 
we actually use them in 
our own offices. So when 
Lee needs to project in- 
ventory costs, or Brian 
wants to figure employee 
bonuses, the first 
thing they do is load 
up geoCalc. 

The very same spread- 
sheet you can use at home for 
figuring finances, mastering math 








SofUr 




J 



CfcC-i Mt t^ o^Ujfj ip*-:inl ^:\k^ ^^°'^|W^S tOT(ito 



]0;«iHi:.; txt*n:ei 



jpt'tfrf'^ Ul,fg:i4. 



WB L C 



E 



Jn»*^ ;/ifthw>v j^tooft 



iiieS" 



DIM 






[TflMportaEioo 



im 



yjtitta 9i^)ppq; 



«6^ 



H7tlj 



Mfit 



tianit rold_ 



-1»"« 



mysteries or personal production 
predictions. 

With geoCalc, you get 112 
columns and 256 rows to fill with 
all kinds of text and numbers. 
And formulas that range from 
simple addition to arctangents 
and cosines that could knock any 
physicist cold. 



There are investment 

functions. Averages. Even a 

random number generator. 

And writing your own 

formulas is as easy as, umra... 

one, two, three. 

With mouse in hand, you 
can zip all over the huge 
spreadsheet, solving "what 
if ' questions with a few quick 
clicks. Questions like, "If 
Sheila takes the waitress job, 
how much can we expect our 
taxes to increase?" Or "How 
much faster will the Chevy go if 
we rip out the muffler and the 
back seat?" 

No matter what the problem, 
if it has to do with numbers, 
geoCalc can solve it. Fast. 
So if you notice a need to 
decimate digits, consider 
crunching them with geoCalc. We 
rely on it for our business. In fact, 
we couldn't manage without it. 



To order call 1-800-443-0100 ext. 234 

geoCalc $49.95 

(Gilifornia residents add 6.5'S sales tax. ) 
$2. 50 US/$5.50 Foreign for shipping and 
handling. Allow six weeks for delivery. 

f^ttr^. wrCifc rinJ|l,-tk[V,^4lmv1i,vrtia)nunir,(iHetkwbTidlM(t». 



n 



Berkeley 
Softworks 



The bri^test minds are working at Berkeley. 




TELECOMMUNICATIONS 



HVSrZ.\N\l-: MtCOACII AM) IJA\ SCIIKIN 



Connect! 

A Guide to Telecommunications 
Literacy 

Become an on-line expert in 
this ongoing 
telecommunications tutorial. 



Msi part three of our series, \vc cover some of tlic more pop- 
ular features found in telecommunications programs. We will 
also show how to connect C^ommcxJore mcKlems to \'arious 
C'ommcxlore computers tlinnigli photoj^niphs :uxl a refer- 
ence chart. 

,\n explanation of tlic features in telccomnninicalion.s pn)- 
grams are usefLtl so you Ciin properly shop tor a terminal pro- 
gram. TTiese features may not be available in ;ill telecom- 
munications prograni-s, but attempt to find one tliat has ;ill 
tlie optioas you need. Keep in mind tliat llie way \-ou use 
tliesc features will \nr)- from prognun to progr-.mi. 'lliese fea- 
tures arc not listed in ;uiy special order of iinportiuicc. 

The first t%\o features are variable baud rates and user-de- 
finable parameters, \';iriab!e baud rates ;tre needed if you are 
using a modem that c;ui be operated at eitlier .^00 baud or 
1200 baud (tlie Commodore 1 fi^J/MtKleni 1200. for exam- 
ple). User-definable parameters mc-ui tliat you c:ut control 
the settings for pant}-, stop bits and duplex. 

Auto-dialing is a welcome fc-ature. of course, but \()u must 
make sure that your nKxlem is capiil^le of it. ^bu enter tlie 
number you wish to cidl :uid llie teicconimunications soft- 
ware will do tlie dialing. More ad\;inced telecommunications 
programs also ha\e ;ui option to retli;d tlie numlx-r automati- 
cally if it is buS}" or no one aaswers. 

Anotlier option commonly used with auto-dialing is a tele- 
phone directon,-. ThLs lets you add your most firequcndy 
c;iiled numbers to tlie telecommimications prognun for fti- 
ture use. With tliLs option, you slm]-)ly select tlie telephone 
number you wish to di;il from a menu of a\-ailable numbers 
and the program auto-dials it. 'Iliis sa\-es you trom entering 
tlie number of your favorite bulletin board or data ixise each 
time you call. 

Some pnigrams allow for programmable keys called ma- 
cro keys. These keys store names, numbers, or luiytliing else 
tiiat you wish, for instant reciill, 'Iliis is u.seftil for storing your 
password and/or user ids tliat m:in\- commerci;il d:ita bases 
:uid bulletin Ixiards systems retjiiire. 

A built-in buffer (sometimes c-.illed a text buflfcr) is ver^' 
usellil for saving all or part of the information you ;irt view- 
ing on-screen. This information c-an tlien be saved to disk 
(usually in a sequential file) or dumped to vour printer if a 
printer option is availalile. 

Text buffers come in many sizes. The size of a buffer will 
depend on the amount of avaifabte RAM in your computer 
For example, the \1C 20 has 3.5K of RAM and tlie 128 has 



Tap into the wealth of information 
available through telecommunica- 
tions. 



128K of IIA..M. Tlie ;imount of buffer space will ;dso change 
finom progr.tm to pn)gr;uii on tlie s;une model of computer 
depending on how llie prognun w;ls written. \\m will need 
to know tliis infoniiatioii to be able to decide if a text buffer 
is large enougli for your application. 

Some prognims iillow tor person;U choices of thin^ like 
screen, border ;ind text colors, lliese choices are ver\' usefi.tl 
if you have a fiivorite color comliination or are using a black- 
and-wiiite television as a monitor 

Another usefiil feature in telecommunications software is 
its ability to be used widi more tlian one model ;uid bnind of 
modem. This is important if you decide to ch:uigc m(xlcls or 
brands at a later time, :ukI still w;uH to u.se die s;ime sotTO'ure. 

One of tlic most (X)]iul;tr fe-aiuR-s Is tlie ability- to upkjad 
and dovvTiload pn^grams and text files using common proto- 
cols. The two most common protocols are XModem and 
CBM-Puntcr. XModem is a ver\' popular protocol tx'C-au.se ;J- 
most all brands of home ;uid person;il com|xiters have ;ui 
XModem pnitcxol telecommunicaikms pnignim ) — a\:iilable 
to them. Tliat is, if a computer of one brand Ls connected ttj a 
computer of anotlier bnmd, tlic\' c;in transfer a file or pro- 
gram th)m one to tlie otiier lliis does not me;in diat tlie odi- 
er computer will he able to nin tlie prognun. Tlie second 
computer could sentl die pn)gr;uii to a tliird computer, ;uid if 
computer numlx;r tlirce v\';ls tlie same m;ike ;uid m(xlel as 
the originator of die prugnim (computer numlx^r one), the 
program could now Ixr nm. "\bu can .see how Uiis abilit\- to 
send and store files'progr.ims frochone computer to anodier 
(ev'cn though dicT are not of the same make or mcxlel ) can 
be \'cr\' usetiil.g 

The following table determines which figure you 
should refer to for your combination of computer, mo- 
dem and monitor. To use tliLs tabic, find your computer 
in the left-hand cokiitin, Uien move across until you 
find your modem t>pe and, where applicable, your 
monitor type. 

1600 1650 1660 1660 1660 1660 1660 1670 

1902A 1902 1802C TV 

8-pin' 5-pin" 
\^C 20 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 8 Fig 9 

SX-64 Fig 1 N/A Fig 6 Fig 9 

C64 Fig I Fig 2 Fig 7 Fig i Fig 3 Fig 5 Fig 9 

CI 28 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 7 Fig 4 Fig 3 Fig 5 Fig 9 

PluV4 N/A N/A Fig 7 Fig 4 Fig 3 Fig 5 Fig 9 

i*^A This combination is not recommended and may cause 

damage to you modem and/or computer 

* This applies to all models of C^ommodore monitors when 

using an 8-pin 3-plug monitor c-;ible. 

•• This applies to all models of Commodore monitors when 

using a 5-pin 2-plug monitor cable. 



18 MARCH '87 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 



Figure 1 



Figure 2 



Figures ^ 



Figure 4 




Figure 5 



Figure 6 



Figure? 



Figures 



Figure 9 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 19 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 



mRoiiiiur w. 1!aki:r 



Inside 
QuantumLink 

E:^lore the inner tvorkings 
ofti>e QuantumLink 
telecommunication service with 
network pro Bob Baker. 

Time-Wasters 

When viewing messages fi«m a mes- 
sage board, rcmemlx;r tliat you can al- 
ways stop them by hitting tlic 1-5 kc)- at 
any time. As long :ls tlic check mark is 
displayed in die upper-riglit-liand comer 
of your screen, hitting die F5 key simply 
terminates the messiige at tliat point. 'ITie 
check mark should dis:i]ipe;ir, indicating 
the transmission has stopped. 

Once tlie transmission has ceased, you 
can tlien press the F7 ke>' to get the end- 
of-mcssagc prompt. Tliis pn)mpt lets you 
press Fl to see the next message in die 
thread or press F7 to sec the options 
menu. Pressing F5 at eidicr point will 
clKir the current niessiige and redisplay 
the hist screen of message headings that 
was displayed. 

This shortcut really helps when )ou 
just want to read respoases to a message 
you posted yourself, or when reading ad- 
ditional responses to a message you read 
prcwously. Press the F5 ke\' as soon as 
the first heading line is displayed iuid the 
rest w^ilt be terminated. I lowever, if die 
mcss^e is very short, you nia\' wind up 
pressing the F5 key kx) late and the en- 
tire message will lie cleiux'd. In this case, 
you'll have to rc-displa)' tlic original mes- 
sage and then let the short message 
transmit to completion. 

The new capabilities of scanning mes- 
sage lx)ards for specified topics has been 
a real lifesa^'er. However, this feature 
makes it extremely ini|XMt;uit diat every- 
one use meaningftil headings ft)r dieir 
messages w^hen jxisting a new message 
on a message board. Try to use key 
words that relate to die subject of the 
message, using standiird alihreviadons if 
necessary. 

Also, try to keep message headings 
short enough that die response indicator 
will not delete an import;mt part of the 
heading wlien someone posts a resjxinsc 
to your messjige. 'Ilie (R) response indi- 
cator is always added in a specific col- 
umn posiUon in die lie;tding, regardless 




of what is already there. In some cases 
this c:in wipe out a verj^ important piece 
of information. 

1 ;dwa\s tn- to include the machine- 
type in die liciidings I create when post- 
ing mes.sages in the New Pnxiucts Infor- 
mation section of CIN. 'ITiis makes it e;isi- 
er to locate everydiing relating to die 
Amigii, for example, by .sciuining for ev- 
ery mc-ssage containing the word Amig;i. 
Fortunately, diis won't be necessarv' tor 
vcn' much longer since we're going to 
start brciiking the new product informa- 
tion into categories. 

llie New I'nxluct Information section 
h;LS rc"Jly t;iken ofl'. More comp;mies ;ire 
stiuting to participate on a regular Ixisis, 
with some even posting dicir own intbr- 
mation direcdy to die mes.s:ige lx);u*d. 
I've been posting as m;ui)' as five to ten 
mess;^;es a day at times, ;uid at one pijint 
the message board had over 1 ,000 mes- 
sages. 

Due to the volume of information in 
die New Product Inforniation section, 
Quiuituml.ink is going to stiul aging die 
mes.s;ige IxKird to eliminate die older in- 
formation after 60 to 90 days. We hope 
to save the older information in some 
kind of downloadable archive files so 
the information will still be available 
if needed. 

Hot oflf the Wire 

By die dnie you read this, we should 
have a new download area widiin the 
New Prcxiucts Information area wiiere 
demos, shareware, specificatioas, m;in- 
uals, on-line cat;dogs. and software up- 



dates are available. Also, watch for special 
offers to Quiuitumlink subscribers that 
several coni|ianies have made available 
fixjm time to time. 

Additional dovvTdoad areas are also be- 
ing added in a Special Edition Softv\'are 
I jbrarv' within the Commodore Software 
Showcase secdon of CIN. This area is 
specificiilly for downloads of programs 
ftxim major magazines, 'lliere will also be 
areas for downloads from specific au- 
thors. 

You'll also find additional areas for spe- 
cific companies, Tliese areas are being 
created to ^\e you direct access for as- 
sisfcmcc and feedback widi the v;uious 
companies producing major products. 
This should really be of interest as more 
companies piirticipate. 

The Tutoring (xniter in die Ixr.iniing 
Center is ;U,so exp;uiding. You'll now find 
niondily schedules of classes, teacher 
profiles, and class descriptions from die 
main menu. When this column was writ- 
ten, courses included English, Madiemat- 
ics, Science and Computer Program- 
ming 

Each of the Tutoring Center major to- 
pics has an individual class schedule, as- 
sociated message lx)ard, downloadable 
study materi;il, plus on-line quizzes widi- 
in its own menu. Additional topics are 
also covered widiin a General Studies 
area, but the.se will only have simple 
message Ixiards for now: Additional sub- 
jects are being added as teachers arc ;ir- 
nuigcd. 

One last item of interest Ls die Trea- 
sure Hunt inlbmiadon available in Just 
for Fun. Users trying to solve the Trea- 
sure Hunt and win the 5500,000 receive 
clues on-line. 'Ilicse clues, combined 
with the book and videot;ipe, help solve 
the puzzle. The book is available for 
S9.95 and the video tape is available for 
S19.95. Both contain separate sets of 
clues leading to tlie tre-asurc. 

If you ever experience difficultv' vvidi 
die system, please bc-ar vvidi it. Tliere is 
so much development work going on 
that small problems are bound to crop 
up fix)m time to time. If }'ou should nm 
across a problem, notifv- die people at 
Quantumlink via E-mail to JENN'^' C ,sc> 
the}' can investig;ae ;ind correct it. g 

Bob Baker is in charge of the New P}xxl- 
nets Information area on the Quan- 
tumLink netuork He can fx ivacbed 
on Q-Link via E-Mail addressed to 
RBAKER. 



20 MARCH '87 







byiheume 

siiegetsto"piioendc' 
heu be sueping. 






^[CHrtPWP 1 



•EIj 



.|M*<tH ; tr OitcB ^; >**t: tfl Ijfii. * : wae?w 



tlteft JlMtnpTlio* .^fej^'j^tjiijiaoir 



Having thousands of facts is one 
thing. Finding the ones you need is 
another. Which is why you should 
consider buying geoFiJe. The 
easy- to - use database manager for 
GEOS-equipped Commodores. 

Whether they're 
receivables or reci- 
pes, once you have 
geoFile, you can fly 
through facts in sec- 
onds, eliciting and 
picking the ones you 
want, just the way 
you want them. 

It's as simple as fill 
ing out a form. 

The geoFile "form" organizes all 
kinds of information. Like names, 
numbers, rates of objects' accelera- 
tion when dropped from two-story 
buildings — you name it.Asmuchas 
you can fit on a printed page. 



saaw 



^3 



irrx ictd ts 



IftotwwJi (tj : »-r^^41 



'(iTeiSSTJfrCMli 



Once your data is in, the real 
fun begins. 

You want names of bus drivers? 
From Arizona? Under five foot six? 
Between the ages of 33 and 35? With 
incomes of $22,396 or more? Who 
sneezed in June? 
Just click your 
mouse and watch 
geoFile go to work. 
Searching, Sorting. 
Comparing and listing 
the data alphabetically. 
Or numerically. Or in 
whatever priority your 
form specifies. 
You can put the data 
into form letters and lists with geo- 
Merge. Or into math functions, with 
geoCalc. Or if you really want to get 

n Berkeley 
Softworks 



■bOf (» : Vj^lA 



::]:: 



fancy, you can display your infor- 
mation graphically with geoChart. 

And geoFile does it all in 
seconds. 

Now, with all that in mind, what 
are you going to do — spend a few 
bucks on geoFile? 

Or spend all night wishing that 
you had? 



To order call 1-800-443-0100 ext. 234 

geoFile $49.95 

(California residents add 6.5% sales tax.) 
S2.50 US/$5.50 Foreign for shipping and 
handling. Allow six weeks for delivery. 

i.ii!nT.<l!n!B»10«iin»»i«eLt4jiirl;*kf™irt*r<O3nf;«iiV*rH..ir*j^^ Ud 
' iHIS. .s-(tHlc and llnkrir> SnUiBrU ac liadmaiiBr* tit Iki kcic> Sf^twrts. 



GEOFILE i^ 




The brightest minds are working at Berkeley. 



THESIRON 
AREBMTWir 



Whether you're building an 
argument or just hammering 
out a memo, any project looks 
better when you put it together 
in Writer's Workshop. The 
supercharger that powers your 
GEOS-equipped Commodore 
through even the most wrench- 
ing assignments. 

Sharpen your skills. The 
first thing to do in the Workshop 
is plug into geo Write 2. 0, which 
contains all the brand new tools 
you need to hone any rough 
concept into a well-crafted 
document. 

You get headers. Footers. 
Subscripts and superscripts. 
You can center your text. Right 
justify. Full justify. And nai! 



qtct ; fi» j riit , PpiiQftT i pnqn font ; i^ifn { \ ^g|| L Stev SmiOt ^ 



Mr. StTvtSrollS 
Sftuth C4intnunkttkicii 
lK&tX.iA\ihl. Avttiui 
S\AX* nS 
Wtnlxti. CA 4006T 

tJta Stcv<, 

Endcnd p!tn< ftii t mm^r cf teems tlul Itdp tdl l:^ll' GEO$ itorp. 



down formatting problems with 
variable vertical spacing and 
adjustable margins. 

The Workshop cuts down 
on your manual labor, too. With 
one-stroke, "shortcut" keyboard 
commands. They keep your 
hands off the mouse so you can 
keep your mind on your work. 

In fact, there's a complete 
set of heavy-duty accessories 
that not only strengthen 
your writing, but reinforce its 
structure, as well. 








Th« £ one I us ion is not e«rt4in» but Haunting «cl*ntlfi 

•wtd»nc« now Lndtcit*! that thH «D9-b«ttrtnB Eait«r Bunny. « 

Louvd «■ children h^v ind«»d b« *■ r*«t %% w« had 



#4^/ 



\ 



WWMHMIWJW 



Replace old, worn-out 
parts. You can build anything 
with Writer's Workshop. And 
repair old stuff, too. Just decide 
which parts have to come out 
and which new ones go in. 

Then hit the key and stand 
back. 

Instantly, the "search and 
replace" drills through your old 




BESrCASES 
lAWORKSHOR 



/ 



THE EASTER BUNm': 
Rodeat oF Reality or Man-Made 
Mjth? 

The concloston is n« ccnain 
moummg scientific evidence now indienns 
ihM Ihe egg-bearing Easter Bunny' we dl 
loved as children may indeed be as Teal as 
we had hoped, 

Aldiougli tradiiionally teclusivc, ihe 
bashfu! bunny has been sighted with 
increasing frequency; over the past five 
years. As Illustrated in Figure 6. the annual 
number of sightings has steadily grown 
from a low of I,S76 in 19S2 to over 5,346 
so far this war. 








NEW 
EVIDENCE 
ABOUNDS 



"T!w problem uw't so much the 
bunny, as it is the eyewitnesses," adds 
Dr. Dougherty, "Many of them arc 
unreliable, with nothing to show for thetr 
claims except for big baskets of chocolate 
eggs' leading us to beleieve v,>e'ie not 
dealing with a rabbit as such, but perhaps 
an Easter Chicken." 

At first, the sightings were attributed to 
crackpots who saw The Easter Bunny as 
pan of a leligiouB ritual. However, since 
The Easter Bunny has been seen by adults 
as well as children, scientists have 
become less skeptical. 

In fact, as Dr. Uevano points out, 
"The Easter Bunny must be taken 
seriously by everyone front school 
children to the President of the United 
States," 



text, replacing worn-out words 
and phrases with your brand 
new ones. 

For more serious cases, hand 
the job over to the Workshop s 
Text Grabber. It takes text from 
several word processors — like 
Paper Clip"' — and lets you over- 
haul them with new GEOS fonts, 
formats and graphics. 



A few more built-in 

features. Every project leaves 
the Workshop looking beautifully 
finished, too. Because it not 
only comes with LaserWriting 
compatibility, there's even a 



rf 



Berkeley 
Softworks 



LaserWriter for you to print on. 

You simply upload your files 
to QuantumLink."' Then they're 
printed and mailed back. 

Convenient, or what? 



I ^*oi: 1 fi« ■ »ft i options j pnqa I font \ gijl« H" 



iJW}^ fHaM l-IMT . T 



Jtii Smith 



« OlTt » « lilt » 
«iddr » 

Ikit «nkkni[rii», 

rm h»^*i[i.' > p»nj. TTwrt'll ttpltftty of «drtiik»htn, Yeu: 
>tip(wtwil*''^i\K" »l knoiu ijou Uion uitirt lo rritt (wvj of lh» fuo o 
Ofi !ce ol iNst. «hnmei> tuill be fnEi*. loo. «r#cknfflt>t» you QOtia mr 



Of course, you don't want to 
keep good-looking documents 
like this to yourself. So we built 
in geoMerge. Which customizes 
your geoWrite form letters to 
people on your mailing lists. 

So if your plans call for some 
real masterpieces, do something 
really constructive about it. Call 
your software dealer and requisi- 
tion Writer's Workshop. 

Who knows? You just might 
build a name for your self. 



To order call 1-800-443-0100 ext. 234 
Writer's Workshop $49.95 

(California residents add 6.^"c sales tax.) 
$2. 5U US/S5. 50 Foreign for shipping and 
handling. Allow six weeks for delivery. 

OjHimodorc IS a Ir^cmddi of (.'tflimodoa- EL_vfmnM!5, Lid 

(;W1S. Writers ^^>rksjK!p and Be:U*kT Sflftwirks ,irf 

tnwjcrvinvs i!llk'rkL.[cv S<fflM)fkh, PiiiKT Cliti i, ,> 

riT(i&it>rLTjifadfiri.Trk[jflW:frK;s Intlwkri 



WRITER'S 
WORKSHOP 




The brightest minds are working at Berkeley. 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



in <, RAMAN! KINSI-n' 



Defender of 
the Crown 



Computer: Amiga 

Publisher: MLndscape 

3444 Dundee Rtxitl 
Northbrook, 04IL 60062 

Medium: Disk 

Price: S50.00 



Mind 



idscape's new adventure game ibr 
the Amiga is the first in Mindseape's Clin 
emawarc scries. It is an "interactive men - 
ie," a world in which you :ire tlie laid 
chiir.icter. Tlie st(5r\'line re\'olves tot;illy 
;ux)und yoiu" actions. 

Tile scene Ls England in the twelftli 
century. The king has been murdered, 
and as a rc"sult. the Nomian luid SiLxon 
Pactioas ;ire battling for tlie tlinine. '^bu 
play one of tlie three Saxon lords, ;uid 
your goal Ls to capture all three Norm;m 
casdcs. which will make }'ou king. You 
choose which Saxon you play. Kach of 
tlie tour choices has difl'erent leveLs of 
leadership, jousting abilit)' and sword- 
wielding prowess. 

ITie most valuable asset in this game is 
kuid. For e:icli territory you own, you 
collect taxes — ^\'Our main source of in- 
come. And you need all tlic gold you c;Ln 
get s<) you can buy men-at-arms, knigliLs 
and cauipults. But, of course, tliere are 
other alternatives. Challenge another 
lord to a joust v\itli land as stiikes. Or sim- 
ply joust for ftunc. Tlie jousting scene is 
tile most life-like scene in die pn>gnun. 
'Ihe s<iund of die opponent's g;ilk)p is ex- 
tremely realistic. 

But then, land-poor lords have quick 
rLprisals. SnL"4ik int(i ;inodier lortl's castle 
at niglit :uid ste:il his gold out from under 
him. But Ix.' wiinied, you'll ha\e to kill 
die lord's guards in hand-to-hand com- 
bat. Unless \our character is Geoffrey 
l.ongsword (the onh' Saxon master 
s\vordsm;ui ), it will not be easy. And il 
you ;u-e captured in tlie process, you \vi\[ 
have to nuisoni yourself out of there. 

In the process, you'll have to learn 
hov\- to build and lead ;m ;irmy elfecti\el\- 
if \ou wiint to have an\' ch:uice of Ix-- 
coming king. IIa\ing a gcKKl ratio of men- 
at-amis to knights in \'our lu^my is ver>- 
Impirtant. Just a ficv^' kni^iLs c:ui tip an 



f'«'*^l 


I 


4.*^Ai^^ ^ "'Wn 






Ii 


^ 1^^'A ' '* JSIIh 


1 



Many Amiga oumers mill purchase 
this game for one name 
alone: Jim Sachs. 



evenl)' matched battle between r^vo ;ir- 
mies into a rout. WitlKjut a backlxMie of 
men-at-arms to attack from, your expen- 
sive kniglits can get surrounded :uid de- 
stro) ed in an instant. 

Also, don't lay siege to a casde widiout 
a m;issi\c force, espcci:dly since a lot of 
practice is needed v\'idi die catapult Ix.-- 
tbre you c;in knock down a castle \v;ill. 
And one final note. If you c;in a'scue a 
kidnapped Saxon lady from the Nor- 
mans, your luck in batde will impro\-e 
tremendously. 

Hie graphics in diis pR)gnmi ;ire iuii:iz- 
ing. You really must see it to Ix'lieve it. In 
fact, many Amiga owners will buy this 
g3me l^ecausc of one name: Jim Sachs. If 
you have .seen any Amig;i ;irt before, )'ou 
know diat Jim Sachs has no e<.[ual. Antl 
believe me, in this game Jim niainudns 
hLs rcputatioa 

I'nfbrmnatcly, I finished the game ;ifter 
only uvo days. I put in a tot;il of about 
seven liours of plav'. At its current price. 
Defender of the Cnnnt cost me aliout 
tiiree times more per hour as ;uiy mo\ie 
at die dieatcr. If you are expecting :ui in- 



teractive adventure with graphics and 
sound like you"\e never heard before, 
diis is a must buy. But if die ]ireini.se of a 
fantas"\'-ad venture has got you ho]>ing for 
a better-looking lllihmi steer cle:ir. 

Be w;ir\' of die manual. For cx;uiiple. 
when it (.liscus.ses die catajiult. there are 
some discrepiuicies. 'ilie nianiud s;iid that 
Ixjulders were best for knocking tlown a 
castle's wall, but huiiing Cireek tire ;uid 
diseased animals were best at killing die 
besieged soldiers. Howc\er in the pro- 
gr;un you have no choice of what to cata- 
pult — you c:ui only throw boultlers. 

Be carefiil when buikling a new castle 
in a newly won territory'. Once a casde is 
built, 20 men-at-arms ;u'e autoniatic;illy 
alkjcated to defend die castle. But you 
cannot alIoc:ite more dian 20. So, in ef 
lecE, building casdes is of little \ alue, he- 
cause any decent-sized army can take 
your outer lands widi ease. 

In sLiniman. Defender of the Crown is 
ven' cntert;miing. Keeping in miiitl diat it 
is not quite as complex as you niiglit 
have expected, you can still relish the 
WT)- impressive grapliics. g 



24 MARCH '87 



AREYOU 




FORFMENDS? 







If you're finding it increasingly 
difficult to find anything at all, 
maybe it's time you found out 
about geoDex. The GEOS- com- 
patible directory that generates 
mailing lists. Prints address 
labels. And sorts out all sorts of 
things for your Commodore. 

Tty directory assistance. 
With a little help from geoDex, 
you can call up a directory 
organized from any three catego- 
ries you choose. Which means 
you can list your friends by name, 
telephone number or 
almost anything else 
that can be assigned 
its own three- 
character code. 

Like "MEN" for 
guys you know. Or 
"GRL" for girls you 
know. Or "FOX" for girls or guys 
you'd like to know. 

But no matter how you choose 
to categorize them, if you can 




point and click a 
mouse, you can call 
up any list of friends 
with geoDex's easy- 
to-read graphics. 

Our most in- 
viting feature. Of 
course, once you've 
gotten your friends 
organized, the next thing we 
recommend you do with geoDex 
is really very simple. 
Throw a party. 
You see, geoDex comes with 
geoMerge, a mail 
merge program that 
customizes form let- 
ters, announcements 
— even party invita- 
tions — with the 
names and addresses 
stored in geoDex. 
First you write the letter with 
geoWrite. Then you select a 
list from geoDex. 

n Berkeley 





1 ^;ki r»* yv t»*Dni • i-5« , trst \'^ 


i^f "-:■"■?' 










Eirtv., Cil f-VJ 



Put them both 
together with 
geoMerge and it's 
toga time! 

The search is 
over. So if you're 
tired of looking 
for friends, waltz 
right down to your 
software dealer and ask him for 
geoDex. We can't guarantee it'll 
win you more friends, but it'll cer- 
tainly keep you from losing them. 



To order call 1-800443-0100 ext. 234 
geoDex $39.95 

(Californui residents add 6.5% sales tax.) 

$2. 50 US/$5. 50 Foreign for sliipping and 
handling. Allow six weeks for delivery. 

ConimodMt is 3 lr.Tdeniarko(Coninit«Jott Kk-clpirpcs. Lid. GEOS. 
geoDex and lfcrlti.-fc.-y SoFlwtrtiS ait tiadcnanm af Ik-r1«-tf>- Solw-orits, 



GEODEX 



Softworks 

The brightest minds are working at Berkeley. 




./ 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



KliVIEVCED BY EKVIN IK)BO 



Chessmaster 
2000 

Compuler: Commodore 64 

Publisher: Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404 

Medium: Disk 

Price: S34.95 



M. here should be notliing new about a 
game of chess — e%cn' combination of 
mo\'CS has been made at one time or ;ui- 
otlier. Computer chess, however, is :in- 
other story. Programmers still have a 
ways to go in their attempts to simulate 
this game. 

But with Chessmaster 2000, a new 
stand;ird in ches.s for home computers 
ma)' Ix- set, not only because of tlie stun- 
ning 3-D grapliics, but because it reaches 
new heights, boasting over 71,000 
moves in the opening libran-. 

In the standard play mode, you ha\'c 
an overhead view of the chess board 
witli Hattened chess men tliat look like 
decaLs. Press Control-P ;md the perspec- 
tive changes. Now you are looking at tlic 
board from an angle much Uke the one 
you would have if )'ou were playing witli 
real pieces on a table. Hach piece is 
drawn to give it a 3-D look. 

In this mode, the board can be rotated 
90 degrees at a time, allowing you to ex- 
amine the situation from many angles. 
Using tile rotation okkIc twice in succes- 
sion will rum the boiird 180 degrees — 
usefijl for switcliing sides if you find tlie 
computer is beating you! You can switch 
sides any time during die g;ame. 

Tlie l">oard is blue ;ind wliite, and the 
game pieces ;ire blue and gold. For tlie 
benefit of tliosc who may not have a col- 
or monitor, a black-and-white mode uses 
shades of gray. 

For tlie no\-icc and those of us who 
play so infi-equendy diat we get muddled 
by moves like "king's pawn to rook 4," 
the classical notations of cliess have been 
set aside in favor of an algebraic notation: 
02- D4. You may also have the letters ;uid 
numbers displayed around the borders 
of tlie Ixiard. 

Tliere is a large menu of choices, and 
you may toggle back and forth between 



Chessmaster 2000 

features over 

71,000 moves 

in the opening 

library. 




the menu and tlie boarti to see how your 
choices ;tflcct die game. Tlie menu di- 
vides your screen into four sections. At 
upper left is the main menu called 
Choices. Select any of the items listed 
here and a sub-menu ap[X';irs at lower 
left. Select a fc'iture and die lx)x at k)wer 
right shows you die cun"enl status. 

The box at the upper right of the 
screen displays all the mo\'es that have 
been made. An asterisk in tlie notation — 
such as D2'D4 — ^wiE indicate diat an op- 
ponent's piece w;ts capatred witli tliat 
move. On die odier hand, if die nouition 
carries a plus sign — as in D2-D4 + — then 
the piece on D4 has placed the oppo- 
nent's king in check. The information on 
mo\'cs GUI be sent to your printer so that 
you can have a permanent record. 

In the Teaching mode, selecting die 
piece to move causes the square on 
which that piece resides to be liighliglit- 
ed, and the sc|uarcs to wliich it ma)' ieg;il- 
ly mo\'e are ;ilso liighliglited. TliLs will be 
a great help to die beginner ;ind at die 
same time prevents illegal moves. 

Also for the beginner is the Show Hint 
feature, which tips you oflF as to what 
your next move should tx.'. It e\en pla)'s 
feir! After almost throNsing away a game 
because of a smpid move, I decided to 



rely entireh' on tliis feaaire. "\bu toggle 
between die menu luid die giune to see 
die suggestion. 'Ili-LUiks to diese hints, 1 
actually beat die computer 

The Show Tliinking mode takes you to 
die inner workings of die computer, dis- 
playing eacli possible nio\'e. Se:irch Ix-vel 
shows liov^' deepl)' into possibilities die 
computer is consitlering. And for those 
who wonder just where things began to 
go wrong, the Repla)' Game option will 
show \'ou. 

Playing ag;iinst die computer, diere are 
19 levels of play nuiging from newcomer 
to grand master The level selected will 
determine not onl)' die difficult)' of the 
game but die time required to pkn- it. In 
the higher le\'els, die computer spends 
more time searching for possible nio\'es 
and considering die consequences of 
each move. At level the computer 
makes one nunc everj- five seconds, and 
at level 18 it may take as long as 30 min- 
utes per mo\'e. Fortunately, you may save 
a game and return to it later 

If you don't teel like playing a game 
yourself, insert the Games disk and 
watch a repla)' of one of 1 00 classic 
g:imes. Here the pla\' of past grand mas- 
ters allows you to said)- and ana!\'2e dieir 
Continued on jig. 114 



2e MARCH '87 



:1i<^iKf5ii 




SPORTS I 



From the incredible realism and 
playability of Football... 



i'*^ 




^'^^ 



i^ ■ iv 1 ;' 












'^^ 




fi?^ 



5??- 



■.6&,-?' 



...to the sophisticated statistical 
simulation of Baseball... 



:vm^ 






See Your Dealer. For additional product 
ordering information or the name of the 
dealer nearest you, call (800) 637-4983. 




ki^m 










.SubLOGIC. The State of the 
Art in Sports Simulations. 



y;-:-^- 



1^^^^^ .^ 


H 


t 

1 


1 









LOGIC 



713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL 61820 

(217) 359-8482 Teleit : 20699S 

Order Line: (8(10)637-4963 

.iiiino5.A!35»a.andHawa.| 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



Ri-:\'ii-:\\'i':i) KY.ii-:i'i' sfiiKiiN 



Spitfire '40 

Computer: (x)mmcxloEie 64 

Publisher: A\';iJ()n Mill Microcomputer 
Games 

4517 Hiuford Road 
H:Utimore,MD 21214 

Medium: Disk 

Price: S55 



X r\' \our liiuitl piloting a Superm;irine 
Spitfire, one of tlie most fiuiioiis figlitcr 
planes to see action in World War II. 'Hie 
Spitfire earned its reputation for figliting 
the Gcmian [.Liftwaftc in tlic Batdc of 
Brit;un, tlic tlircc-montli struggle in 19 iO 
for control of tlic skies over Hngliuid. In 
this battJc. the Spitfire-flying pilots of tlie 
Ro)'al Air Force, though heavily oumum- 
bcred, handed CicniKui)- her first defeat 
of tlie \\'ar :ind s;i\ ed England fi\jni prob- 
able invasion. 

Spitfire '40 has xwq modes of play — 
game or simulator. The game mode 
thrusLs \ou into die middle of a swirling 
dogfight at 10.000 feet. The dogfight 
continues until you either run out of liiel 
or jinimunition, or have lx.-en shot down 
three times. If one of tliesc hapjxn, tlic 
mission is over and tlie computer raiiks 
your performance b;Lsed on tlie number 
of enemy phines \'ou destroyed. 

A tvpiciil mission in game mode lasts 
about five to ten minutes, which m;ikes 
this mode basically a fast-paced intnxiuc- 
tion. It gives you tlic chance to sharpen 
your shcKiting eye and acquiR' some ex- 
perience in handling the plane under 
combat conditions liefore pn)ceeding to 
tlic more demanding simulator mode. 
However, there Ls no feature to let you 
improve ;ui existing score. Wlien a mis- 
sion is completed, even if you have not 
Ix-en shot down once, tlie computer per- 
m;uicndy retires you. You ciui play again, 
but in tliis mode you start each titne as a 
no\ice pilot widi no kills to your credit. 

For a sen.se of continuir\' Ix'tween mis- 
sioas, ;is well as a higlicr level of cli;il- 
lenge, simulator mcxle proxides the :m- 
swcr. In diis mcxle. combat is but one 
part of >'our fliglit routine. A scnunble 
alert first apjx'iirs on die .screen, inlbmi- 
ing y(}ii of die niimix.T of incoming en- 
em)' pliuiL-s, dieir heiglit ;md dicir be;ir- 
ing. llie mission oHici;ill\' begins wiUi 
vour t;ike-off Irom die runwav ;uid tloes 



The one maneuver that 

requires the most trial- 

and-error effort to 

perform also happens to 

be the one most 

necessary to your 

survival — landing. 




•^».,^mji 



not end until you kmd your plane of dit 
gn)und ag;iin or meet a ficrv' dcadi some- 
where along die way. At die conclusion 
of any successflil mission, you can pre- 
serve your fliglit time and number of kills 
on a formatted disk. :ilso) known as your 
fliglit log. until )Our next mission. 

"\bu eontn)l your phuie vvidi die (oys- 
tick and a handful of ke\board com- 
miuids. .\I:uieu\ering die figliter Ls pri- 
marily a fiinction of pushing die joystick 
to the left or right tor turns :uid forward 
or backward to chiinge aldmde. 

llie game relies on tv\'o m:iin screen 
displays. 'Ilie first firatures a colorilil and 
rc;iiistie rendition of tlie Spitfire's instru- 
ment p;uiel, dcpicdng about a dozen dif- 
ferent diiils and gauges. The second dis- 
play shows die vic^' ft^Mii die cockpit 
\viiidov\', but here die graphics lose die 
shiiqiness ;ind detail seen on the [ire- 
vious screen. Objects on die ground, like 
buildings or ponds, appear as flat, odd- 
shaped bkx:ks of white or blue. In com- 
bat, die Gemiiui plane's Hit acnjss die 
screen kxtking more like giant flies diiui 
sleek figliters. 

Tlie player's m;uiual provides a help- 
fiil set of instructit)ns on how to con- 
duct .some basic combat maneu\'ers 
like loops ;uid rolls. Tlicsc c:ui be mas- 
tered \\idi a little pnictice. In fact, most 
aerial acroiiatics ;ire instinctive in die 
heat of liatdc ;ls \'ou sti'tiggle to shake 
;in enemy ofl' \ dur t;ul or keep one in 
your gunsiglits. Widi enougli airspace, 
you e;ui atteni|it practic:illy ;uiy maneu- 
ver v\'idK)iu wrecking your iihuic. In 
k)w iiltitutle dogtiglits, however, keep a 



close eve on die altimeter. It's aU too 
easy to lose track of height and send 
your aircraft on a screaming dive 
straiglit into die ground. 

The one manemer that requires die 
most trial-and-error effort before it can 
be performed with any degree of com- 
petenc-v' ;iLs<) happeas to be die one 
most necessirv' to your survi\al — land- 
ing. Unlike almost luiy other situation 
you will face as a pilot, bringing yotir 
plane back down to die ground leaves 
no TOovn tor niisc;dculation. A Utde too 
much speed on toucli-dovMi or a slight 
tilt to die wheels lc;ids to die same fatal 
resulLs, liitil v'ou feel completely com- 
Ibrtalile widi die landing procedure, al- 
ways take a long, long approach to the 
runway, one that gives you enough 
time to shed excess .s]x.'ed ;uid iii;ike 
;uiy last second course adjusUiienLs be- 
fore your wheels bump the ground. 
Also, aldiOLigli the rules do not clue you 
in to tliis. it is possible to land in a field 
instead of on die airstrip. 

Spiljiiv 'iO has no cle;irly-delincd dif- 
ficult)' levels. Rather, the more tliglit 
time you record on your log disk, die 
more re;Ulstic the simulator becomes. 
According to die rulelxxjk, diis meaiis 
cert:iin re;J-life quirks of the Spitfire de- 
sign will niiike die phuic li;irdcr to h;ui- 
dle, and die Gemiiui figliters will be- 
come tougher op|X)nents. Odierwlse, 
tlic rules arc purptisetlilly vague about 
when or in what ways diese leaps in 
reidism will occur As a result, diougli 
my habit of missing tlic auiway h:us not 
Con I in lied on pg. IN 



28 MARCH '87 



•^^^ 



"Coptain'S Log, October 1. 1944. 0250 Hours. 
Fleet submof ine USS Hammefhead proceeding 
Southwesl ot cruising speed. Our mission: 
inlercept enemy convoy otf the coast o( Borneo. 
Disperse and destroy." 




Captain's Log ... 
War Date 10.01.44 



Tanily toOOllBU PC J(- sac 





-7 


If 


I 


^SjH 




BS 







"0300 Hours. Two fiours until down. Radar 
picks up convoy, escorted by two destroyers. 
We believe ttiot one ol tfie enemy's waluQble 
cargo stiips is port ol convoy formation." 



"0400 Hours. Lookouts on the bridge. 

Target Identilicotlon parly reports one cargo 
ship. 4,000 tons, troopstiip of 10,250 tons, with 
two Kaibokan-tfpe escorts. Moving into 
ottock position." _, 



"OSOO Hours, Sound General Quarters! 
Battle stations rrrannad. Prepoiing tor lorpedo 
run. Gauge Panel OK. Periscope OK. Ctiorts 
and Attack Plot Board OK. All mechanical 
systems OK." 




"0525 Hours. Torpedo rooms report full tubes 
forward and aft. Battery at full charge for 
silent running. We hope water temperature 
will provide thermal barrier to confuse 
enemy sonar." 



"0600 Hours. We are at li no! attack position. 
Convoy moving al 1 knots. Target distonce 
decreasing rapidly ... Crash Dive! Escorts have 
spotted us and are turning to attack! Rig to 
run silent." 



"0700 Hours. Depth charged forone hour. 
Some minor damage, but repQ ir parties ot 
work. Destroyer propeller noises receding. 
We'll come to periscope depth lor our return 
punch." 




-0715 Hours, Torpedo tubes 1 , 2. 3 fired. 
Two destroyers hit ond sinking. One o( the 
enemy's tast cargo ships coming into 'scope 
view — an ideal target position. On my mark . , 
FireTube4!Fire5!" 



"Superb" raves 
Scott May in On 
■^^^ iine, "strategic 
feCDir?r>!: ititensityandheart- 
^ . J pounding action 

have rarely been 
merged this suc- 
cessfully." Analog 
calls it flatly "the 
best submarine 
simulation SO far." Compufe com- 
ments "Silent Service's detail is 
astonishing." Join the more than 
150.000 computer skippers who 
have volunteered for Silent Senrice. 
the naval action/tactics simulation 
—from MicroProse. \ 



fe^. 




cn CUT 
KCDiriPs: 


Hi'MH- 






"*"' '^iZi-'"^'^ 



Silent Service Is ovoikible lor Commodore 64 ' 12B™. 
Amiga™. A[5plell lomily, Alori Xl/XE. Alaii St. IBtW 
l<;/PC Jr, ondlondv fOOO. ol Q suggesied rsioil 
priced S34.95 (Atari ST orxj Amiga. S3».95). 

Comrrxxlore. Amiga, .Apple. Atari, IBM, and Tandy 
ore regisJered Kademarits ot Commodore Elec- 
tronics, Ud.. Commodore-Anjigo Inc.. Apple 
Computer. Inc.. Inlemolional euslness Machines 
Corp.. ond Tandy Corp., respectrvety. 

AvallotJie Iromvour local retailer. If out-ol-slock, 
contact fkilcro Prose direcIV lor further information 
on oui full range of simulation software, and to place 
tiflaslercard/Visa orders. 



;LinlVaIte¥.MD21030 - 13011567-1151 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



H!;\'|[-.\\i:[) Ift' l-RVIN EiOHO 



Discovery 

Computer: ,-Vmig;i 
Publisher: Micro-IUusions 

P.O. Box 3475 

Granada Hills, CA 9 1344 
Medium: Disk 
Price: S39.95 



X he first thing you do in Discx)very is 
select ^iiich of the four crew members 
you wish to be: boy earthling (Scott), girl 
carthling (Kat>'), robot (Mek) or friendly 
alien (Lotar). You manipulate the charac- 
ter through joystick control. Up to this 
point, not that many games for the Amiga 
use a joystick. This may have lead you to 
beUe\e that there is no Amiga joystick. 
And you're right. But there is no need for 
one because standard Commodore 64 
joysticks work fine on the Amiga, 

Following character selection, the 
game scenario and objectives are shown 
on-screen as tlic Amiga narrates them to 
you. The scenario is simple. Your space- 
ship, the Starship Discovery, has crashed 
on a remote asteroid, and only you are in 
the condition to survev' damage to tlic 
ship. You do this b\' gjithering tlie 12 fuel 
crj'stals that were scattered vsithin the 
ship upon impact. 

This sounds simple until you realize 
that your cargo of creepy and crawlv' 
alien specimens was released during the 
crash, The>' too arc wandering around 
the ship. In addition, many connecting 
doors were sealed during the emergency 
that brought you down, and to open 
them now you must solve a math equa- 
tion or spell a word 

The version used for this review is the 
math version, and upon booting you 
choose addition, subtraction, multiplica- 
tion or division — or a mixture of the 
four. You also choose a grade le\'cl. 

When you encounter a closed dcx)r, 
you'll notice a monitor screen on the 
waU near it. The screen on this monitor 
shows a line-drawing of a fece. which 
changes expression as it invites )Ou to 
solve the equation that appears just be- 
low the main screen. All messages from 
the animated monitor are done in the 
standard Amiga voice and are clearly un- 
derstandable. A feature 1 especially liked 
was the problems that could only be 
solved by "Ciurying" nimibers. 

Solving the problem brings forth a 





Your spaceship has crashed on a remote asteroid^ 
and only you are in the condition to survey 
damage to the ship. 



congratulatory- message, the door slides 
open, and you continue on \'our merry 
way, looking for fuel crystals and a\oid- 
ing aliens. Should you fell to solve the 
problem, the correct answer will be dis- 
played. But there is no free ride. Before 
you can proceed, you must solve an 
equation correcdy. 

Your spaceship, seen in cross-sectioa 
is actually a maze. Tliough you see only 
one or two compartments at a time, a 
smooth-scrolling action is automatic as 
you approach tlic lx)rder of die screen. 
At the bottom of the screen, an outline of 
the entire ship appears and your present 
location is indicated b\' a moving blip. 

You move your character through cor- 
ridors and up and down ladders in tlie 
exploration of the sliip. Should you not 
wish to go dov™ a ladder, you must jump 
over the opening by pressing the fire but- 
ton. However, Lf your character jumps 
from a standing-still position, he may not 
make it. He won't be hurt, though, be- 
cause Ming is the proper way to de- 
scend. For a longer jump, you must de- 
velop a knack of continuing your w:ilk 
and pressing the fire button as your char- 
acter reaches the brink. 

Only Scott, Kat>', and Lotar acaially 
jump; Mek, the robot, has rockets in his 
feet that help lift liim over obstacles iuid 
act as retro-rtKkets to cusliion his ftilLs, 
Proper jumping technique and rcflexc-s 
are important, because this is the only 
way to deal with the .scuttling aliens. 
Should you jump on one instead of tn'er 
one, you'll find yourself spun into a tizzy, 
costing you units of strengdi. 

Score is kept on three levels; numlx;r 
of crystals recovered, units of strengtli 



(which incre;ise as )'ou find cr\-st;iLs ;uid 
decrease as you contact the scuttling 
aliens), and a niuneric overall score tliat 
Ls a result of finding cn'stiils — 50 points 
each — and correctly answering math 
equations — H) points eacli. 

As a game, Discorery features ex- 
tremely well-done grapliic backgrounds, 
excellent animation (wait til! you see 
your character climb a ladder), and good 
tiieme music — along with cas\- joystick 
control and a cliiUlenging puzzle. 

Because die objectives of the game ;trc 
presented on-screen at die stiirt of each 
game, the written documentation is 
sparse and consists m;unl\' of tlie proper 
way to enter your luisvvers to tlie math 
problems. ThLs Ls all die documentation 
needed. 

As an educational tool, 1 found tlie 
math levels to match the grades for 
which ti^e\' are intended (;ls ne<ir ;ls I c;ui 
remember; it's been a while since sev- 
entli grade). Moreo\'er, tlie problems are 
written the way most likely to be found 
in schoolbooks and in test papers. ,\nd. of 
course, the system of rewarding a cor- 
rect luiswcr is tried ;uid tnie. 

Altliough I've not \et seen it, the spell- 
ing version of Discoiviy contains word 
lists targeted at grades one tiirougli ten. 
Tliere Ls also a trivia \ersion a^'ailable. 

A great deil of work hits been put into 
Discovety to make it enjoyable as well as 
playable. It is a deliglitfi.il package tliat Ls 
worthwhile. Because the locations of 
crystals are random, each game is a new 
one and should kec-p tlie children com- 
ing back — exacdy what \'ou want from 
an educational g:uiie. I don't hesiuite to 
recommend it liiglily. Q 



30 MARCH '87 




The follow- 
ing programs 
are brought to 
you by an incredi- 
ble series of events. 




ming, 
diving, 
gymnas- 
tics and 
skeet 
shooting, 
just to name a few. 

There's its equally 
acclaimed sequel, Sum- 



Sumo wjc^tiing. 
A sport of ritual and tradition. 




Gyjnrtastiss. A 

graceful display of balance. 

poise and cpncentration. 



The Bobskd. 

One tiTDng move and ii's 

right down the tube. 



the hot dog aerials. And 
beg for mercy in the 
Biathlon. And coming 



Over 30 
of them, 
to be 
specific. 

They're 
the unfor- 
gettable 
events of 
our best-sell- 
ing Games 
series. 

First, World 
GamesT Eight 
h intemationS 
J events rang 
/ ing from 
Sumo wres- 
tling to cliff diving. 
Bull riding to weight- 
lifting. Even skiing the 
Chamonix slalom. 

There's our enor- 
mously popular 
Summer Gamesf 
Break records in 
track, 
swim- 





mer Games IF* Go for 
the gold in rowing, cy- 
cling, equestrian, fenc- 
ing, the high jump, the 
triple jum p, kayaking, 
and more. 
Finally 
there's 
the icy 
challenges 
of Winter 
GamesT Waitll you 
careen the tube in a bob- 
sled. Fly the ski jump. Or 
choreograph 
an entire fig- 
ure skating 
routine.'&u'll 
flip out over 

: Ride a bucking bull ^ 



Cliff Diving, fn Acapitko, 
everyone falk for it. 




nextsummer,oury 
newest Games 
program. (Bet 
ter get ready 
to hit the 



f^ 



I 'RSplayeA. 

Apple II & compuliblcs. 1 To 8 pbwrs. 
Atan ST. €64/128, IBM Apple H & compati- 
& compalibles. Coming bles. Atari, C64/I28. 
for the Apple BGS. 



1 ToS playrts. 
Apple II ik wmpati 
bles, Ce4/I28. IBM 
& ajmpotibles. 




beach 

Now, it 
may seem like 
lot to handle. 

But don't let 
world events 
get the best 
of you 



iTaHplawTS. 

Amina. Apple II & ;■';.,■ ../i 
bles, Atan ST, C6-I, l>d. Ul.\. 
& compatibles. Macintosh. 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



R!-:\'l[;Wi-.l) ISV lOHNJIiRMAIM-; 



Jet and 
Scenery Disks 

Computer: C^ommodore 64 

Publisher: Siiblugic 

713 Hdgc-bnK)k Drive 
Ch;unp;iign, 11.61820 

Medium: Disk 

Price: S39.95 (Ja) 

SI 9.95 each 
(Sccncrj- Disks ) 



A'vc always been fascinated v\ith the sci- 
ence of flying, but let's face it: I'm no pi- 
lot. Randy Havener, a close friend of 
mine, has been thing planes for alx)Lit 
nine \e-ars. but he's never w ritten a soft- 
ware re\icw. So we joined force's. Here we 
eviJiiate /e/ and die Scenerv' Disks that 
work with Jet :ind Plight Simulator IL 

I- light Simulator II has long been con- 
sidere-d the ultimate lliglit simulator. So 
v\1ien Suhlogic's programmers wrote /<?/, 
the)- incorporated tlic basic features of 
Flight Sijnulator U with a simplified 
control and instniment system to make 
Jet easier to operate. 

Jet h:is an interesting blend of com- 
mon fliglit simulation fcjimres. witli one 
or two new ones dirown in tor good 
measure, lite prognun possesses a prac- 
tice mode :uid nine skill levels, 'lliis se- 
tup gives tile aviator in your fiunily die 
oppoitiinit)' to make a fliglit ;ls iliflicult 
as desired. /e( like die Flight Simulator 
11, offers you six different \'ie^\'s from the 
aircraft. To sec die ground in Jet, howev- 
er, tlie pilot must roll his pkuie upside- 
down ;uid press die Ci k-e\' on die com- 
puter, then look up at the ground 
througli the canopy. This strange "way to 
view the ground isn't covered in the 
m;inual. 

Tile control tower view was some- 
thing I hadn't encountered before. By 
pressing die C key, the pilot can vieu^ 
how a person in the control tower 
woukl see die jikine liodi in flight ;uitl on 
die ground, ftx)m its h:mger out to die 
airfield. When die jet is in flight, the pilot 
can fl\' die plane :is if it were remote- 
controlled, viewing the jet from the 
tower 

'Hiere Is a z(X)m factor \\hich is dis- 
played at die bottom right-h:uid comer 
of die screen. A nomial range of sigiit is 




The programmers o/Jet 
incorporated the basic 
features o/ Flight 
Simulator II with a 
simplified control and 
instrument system to 
nuike Jet easier to 
operate 

all you need to fly conventlorud ct\'ili;m 
aircraft flying at approximate!)' 1 21) 
knots, \njet, however, we're de;ding widi 
velocities appniaching Mach 2, which Ls 
twice die speed of sound. To give die pi- 
lot a reasonable amount of reaction time 
to dciil widi objects he c;m't see in die 
dist:uicc, die creator of die program de- 
\'eIopcd the zoom feamre. When diLs is 
acti\ated. die pilot lias die abiliC)' to in- 
teasif)' or reduce the magnilication of 
die inline he sees dinjugli the aircraft's 
wind.sliield. 'Ill is feature o|XTates like die 
z<x)ming in :uid out of a camera lens, and 
it's saved my hide numerous times. 

Missions 

Jet offers diree different tlij^it phuis. 
First, you can fl)' your craft in free-fliglit 
mtxle. Tills phase offers diree possible 
\'ariations. One option ;illows )'ou to fl)' 
iux)und a fictionsd region created tor Jet 
;uid stored on its disk. Or \'ou can so;ir 
over actual American states, found in 
one of Sublogic's Scener)- Disks. A find 



alternative is flying short distances in and 
around four major American cities (Seat- 
de, Ijos Angeles, Boston/NcT\' York. :uid a 
region in central ;uid nordiem Illinois) 
which aie stored on die Flight Simula- 
tor 1/ disk. liich location contaias local 
landmarks ;is well as die major roads, jiir- 
ports and txxlies of water alread) found 
on die Scenerj' Disks. 

Tlie odier t\\'o flight scenarios ch;d- 
lenge the experienced pilots of the 
group to drop Ixjmbs in die Target Strike 
mode or engage the enem\' in a series of 
dogfigliLs. During eidier mode of plaj', 
you have die option of flv'ing a ciurier- 
b:ised I' 1 8 or ;ui ri6 stationed at a mili- 
tar\' airfield. 

'ITie dogfight has alwa)'s been die cta.s- 
sic test of a pilot's knowledge and skills. 
When you compete in this section of die 
progntm, you're required to maneu\er 
into favonilile pt^idoas tor launching ;ui 
attack against an armed moving foe. 
Should your assault turn into feilure, a 
good pik)! knows when to break off die 
attack iuid get awa\' fnim die enem\. Hie 
enemy consists of MICi-21s and 123s, 
which nile the air v\'idi superior iimia- 
ment. 

To counter these obstacles. /e/ oflers 
die player AlM-9 iuid Al.N'I-7 missiles, ;uid 
an M61 machine gun. It's iniportjuit to 
remember die characteristics of each 
missile. The AIM-9 Side Winder is a 
ligfitweiglit accurate heat seeker widi a 
range of about five miles. The AIM-T 
Sparrow Ls a hca\'ier missile, using radar 
to home in on a t;irget. It h;is a medium 
nmge of ajiproximately 25 niUes. 

The g;une pro\'ides a standard ;inna- 
nient of four missOes. but )ou c;ui ;ilter 
dils. If you enter a dogfiglit canying Kx) 
much weiglit, )'ou become a sitting tluck 
because )'Our fuel is consumed at ;ui ac- 
celerated rate. As you ;dter the standard 
missile c:irgo, the sceairio of )'our mis- 
sion and die fliglit time also chiinges. 

In die farget Strike mode of Jet the 
MIGs :ire gfjne, but )'ou have to deal widi 
surface-to-air missiles while m;istering 
the art of precision bombing. Target 
Strike al,so ha\'e its o\\'n arsenal of ;imia- 
ment tor j-our pluie. 'the AGM-65 Mav- 
erick missile has a small impact zone 
with a range of about 14 nifles. An MK- 
82 Smart Bomb tracks a point on die 
ground ;ls it drops ;uid delivers a large 
payload of explosives. I encotirage you to 
experiment widi different combinations 
of ami;uiient weiglit to get fire |X)wer 

Con linnet:! on p}i. I /.{ 



32 MARCH '87 



(Top Guns don't always fly on air . . . Some fly on water) 



Ifllifii 1 1 li F 

wwmnngs 







Red Alert!! Red Alert!! 

0800 hours: Terrorists attack 

U.S. nave! base off Sicily . . . 

Intelligence reports enemy 

missile corvettes fleeing 

toward Libya . . . Additional 

enemy patrol craft seen in 

area . . . Seek out and destroy 

.. .Take no prisoners . . . 

The Need for Speed . . . 

Your search helicopter spots 

the Soviet-buiit Nanuchka II 

missile corvette charging 

across the "Line of Death." 

Foilborne and closing in at 

50 knots, you've got him in 

your sights. Guns blazing, 

you lock-on and launch a 

Harpoon guided missile. 

Through the water spouts of 

his near misses, you see him 

explode into flames. Another 

mission accomplished. 




^ J J J J 



- a © 1987 LFL 




The Patrol 
Hydrofoil Missilecraft. 



So agile, enemy radar 

mistakes it tor iow-llying 

aircraft. 



So fast, enemy forces 
have only minutes to react. 



So deadly, there 
is no second chance. 



A Commanding Simulation . . . 

■ Authentic speed and handling characteristics 
of three different NATO ally hydrofoils: U.S., 
Italian, and Israeli. 

■ Advanced instrumentation and weapons systems 
include: 76 mm water-cooled naval cannon, 
Exocet, Harpoon and Gabriel guided missiles, 
rapid blooming defensive chaff, radar indicator 
and damage control sensors. 

■ Full control of search helicopters and convoy 
ships. 



I 8 real-life missions in today's danger zones like 

the Persian Gulf, the Eastern Mediterranean 

and theGulf of Sidra. 

I Time compression speedsaction to 128x normal. 
I Comprehensive operations manual Includes 

mission briefings and enemy vessel spotter 

cards. 
I Technical consultant: Boeing Marine Systems. 



How to order: VjbH your retallar, sr call 80O-245«t52S lor direct VISA or Mastercard orders (In CA call B0O.5e2<1112]. 

The direct price is S34.95 (or Ihe Commodore version and S39.95 lor the Apple II version, To buy by mail, send check or money order 
to Electronic Arts Direct Sales, P,0, Box 7530, San Mateo. CA94403. Add S3 tor shif>pit\9and handling (S5 Canadian), Please allow 4 
weeks tor Oe livery. Screen shots represent CB4 version. Others may vary. Commodore and CB4 are registered trademarks ot Commodore 
Eiectfonics Limited, Apple [I is a registered trademark o( Apple Computer, Inc, Lucasliim Games, PHM Pegasus, and all elements ol 
the game tantasv:™4 ' 19B7 Lucasfilm Ltd, tL,F.L.). All rights reserved. Electronic Arts, authorised user. 




ELECTRONIC ARTS" 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



REMEWED R\ DONALD MAXVt'EI.1, 



The Big Blue 
Reader 



Computer: 


Commodore 128 


Publisher: 


S.O.G.W.A.P. Sofnvure 




611 Boccaccio Avenue 




Venice. CA 90291 


Medium: 


Disk 


Price: 


S29.95 



"B, 




'ig Blue" is M popiiliir nickname for 
IBM. whose personal computer, die IBM- 
PC ;. lias come \er\- close to becoming an 
indiistrj- standiird in business applica- 
tions. L'nfortunately. howe'S'er, ni;uiy fine 
computers — ^including tlommiMJore's — 
use tlieir own, ver\- different stiindards, 
making tlie tr;uTsfer of infomiation be- 
tween tliem ;uid IBM's ratlier difficult. 

In tlie piLst. the only practical way to 
transfer data lx.-l\veen an IBM-K: :uid a 
(;onimcKk)re computer has been to wire 
tlie computers togedier using eitlier two 
modems or tlie IBM-PC's 1^-232 port 
and die (;<)mmodore's user port. Botli 
connections require a tennin:il prognuii 
be running in each computer, and to 
connect tlie ltS-232 i"X)rt ;uid (commo- 
dore's user ]:)ort, diere must be a special 
interface to tninstbmi tlie ComnKxIore 
user port \oltages :tnd pohirities to RS- 
232 levels. 

Hut raw diere's The //((,' Blue Header, a 
utility program lor tlic Commodore 128 
that lets the 1571 disk dri\'e reatd fixim 
and write to IBM-PC disks. It also ni;ikes 
back-up copies of entire IBM di.sks. And it 
fomiats disks so diey work on Kl's ;uid 
KXompatibles. (Ed. Note: Tlie following 
discussion on transfering files refens to 
data files only. Tliis pn)gniiTi will not al- 
lf)w prognmi from a 1 28 to Ix; nm on an 
IBM-PC. ) 

'litis is just tlie tiling for folks like me 
■who have Commodores at home but 
must use IBM -PC's at work. Now I can 
write sfjmediing on a PC in my office, 
take it home ;uid transfer it to a C:ommo- 
dore disk witli The Bis^ Blue Redder, re- 
\'ise it on my (Commodore I 28, and 
transfer it back again in tlie moming. 

What The Big Blue Reader Can 
Do 

IBM PC's ii.se a disk operating system 
called MS-DCXS. From now on I'll use .MS- 



DOS to indicaie disks for IB.Vl-PC ;uid PO 
compatible computers. With The Big 
Blue Reader, the 1571 dri\'e can read 
;ind write MS-DOS \'crsions 1.0 through 
3.1. Tlie.se include 8- or 9-sector .single- 
or double-sided disks. 

The Big Blue Reader handles all MS- 
DOS and (AMiimodore ASCII text files 
and accounts for tlie embedded ccxles of 
most vKord ptxxicssors. .Vnd it uses the 
"burst" speed of tlic 1571 for m;my oper- 
ations, so it's relatively fast. In fact, it 
writes files to IBM di.sks somewhat taster 
Ui:in to Commtxlorc disks. The only no- 
ticeably slow flinction is backing up en- 
tire IBiM disks on a single drive, which re- 
quires four tlisk swaps for double-sided 
disks. 

In addition to transferring word pro- 
ces.st)r text files. The Big Blue Reader Viil\ 
;J.so work witli filc^ for certain other pn)- 
ducti\it^' sofbA':ire such ;ls s|ireatLshects, 
:Jdiougli this is usellil only if tlie IBM ;md 
Ckjmmodore programs hiindic die infor- 
mation in dieir files similarly. 

It will iilso copy BASIC programs, :d- 
tliougli agiiin Oiis is usetlil onh' wiUi dia- 
lects of BASIC diat Iiodi machines ciui 
understand. On the Ciommodore end, 
BASIC pnjgr-.uns must :ilso be converted 
to or from .VSCII sequential files. 

'Iliere are diree pnigranis e)n T/x Big 
Blue Reader 'llie Big Blue Reader iLself, 
Big Blue Backup and Big Blue Fonnat. 

The Big Blue Reader Program 

Tlic Big Blue Reader prognuii works in 
eidier 8()-column or-iO-column mode. It 
IxKits automat iciilly wiien }'ou turn on or 
re-set tlie computer A tide mes.s;)ge ap- 
pcnirs for a tev\' seconds, dien tlie screen 
cle;irs and you :tre asked to .set die time 
:md d;ite diat you wish to appear on MS- 
DOS dLsks. 

Two menus — main and alternate — ^are 
displayed. On the BO-coIumn screen the 



menus are side-b\-side. ;uid on the 40- 
column screen, one menu is visible at a 
time with the ALT key .switching be- 
uveen diem. 

Tlie main menu displays a disk direc- 
tory: For Commodore disks, diis contains 
die same infomiation that you get when 
you call for the director}' of a Commo- 
dore di.sk on die 128 or die 6 i. only re- 
ordered somewhat. For iui MS-Dt>S disk. 
die infomiation is similar to what \()u 
would .see on the screen of ;in IB.M-PC;: 
die lalx.-I of die disk (or if diere is none, 
the information that it is an MS-DOS 
disk), die filename, die fileniune exten- 
sion, die file size in b\tcs. :ind the d:ite 
and time the file was saved on die disk. 

Although it's not mentioned in the 
ni:iin menu, you c;ui ;il.sf) print out die di- 
a-ctor\- that is in niemon-. .Ant! you c;ui 
read the director)' of any odier disk widi- 
out aflFccdng the directory- diat is already 
in memor\'. 

Tlie ;iltemate menu is re;dly a list of in- 
formation about die tlisk. It stio\\'s die 
type of disk (Commodore or MS-DOS, 
die numlTcr of active sides on die disk, 
the number of sectors per track (if it's an 
MS-DOS disk), disk usage, die tiatc of die 
di.sk. die buffer size in bytes. ;ukI die liuff- 
er contents ( fileniuiie ;uid file size ). 

Using this portion of the package 
couldn't he much e;)sier. You make a se- 
lection frtjm the m;iin menu and The Big 
Blue Rc"ader does it. 

Copy Tunes 

'I'he Big Blue Reader actually writes 
MS-DOS files .slighdy faster dian Commo- 
dore files. For exiunjile, here ;tre copy 
times [ recorded for a 10.000 byte file. 

loatl fnmi Commodore disk 6 sec. 

.\S(^11 triuislatit)n time 9 .sec. 

Write to MS-DOS disk 16 sec. 

U)ad fiiim MS-DOS disk 9 .sec. 

/\S(ni tr;uislation time 8 sec. 

Write to (;ommotiore disk 26 sec. 

Wlien Tlie Big Blue Reader is reading 
an MS-DOS disk, the 1571 busy light 
flickers on and off, but die drive does not 
clack or niiike :in\' odier unusual noices. 
c;omiiiodore disks are read normally, 
vvidi no flicker to die lij^t. 

Big Blue Format 

Big Blue Format tbrmats a disk so it 
will work with ;in 1B.M-PC> or PC-com- 
patible. 'Ilie most poiuihir doiililc-densit)- 
MS-DOS tbmiat is used: .36()lv double- 
sided, 9-scctors per track. According to 



34 MARCH '87 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



S.O.G.W'AP, the program first phjsicall)' 
formats die disk, then logically sets up 
the disk for MS-DOS use. Formatting 
takes about one minute on the 1571. 

Big Blue Backup 

Big Blue Backup will copy :ui entire 
IBM disk, no matter if it is .single-sided or 
double-sided, eiglit-sector or nitic-scctor 
W'itli two dri\es. tliis goes quickly and ef- 
fortlessly. Witii only one dri\e, \oii have 
to s^'ap disks twice for single-sided disks 
and four times tor double-sided disks. 

Documentation 

The 23-puge instruction manual is 
clear ;uid concise. In fact. The Big Blue 
Reader Ls designed so tliat the manuiil is 
hiirdly e\er neetled. 

ne Biii Blue Rviuler w.v, written by 
Mike -Miller, mainl\- in compiled B.VSIC. 
Tlie disk tdso contains a brief prognmi 
called liXFt) diat displa\s cop\riglit infor- 
mation, die S.O.Ci.WA.P address, :uid a 
telephone number tor orders :md infor- 
mation. 

S.O.G.W.A.P., b\ the way, stands for 
Sons of GckI witli All Power 'lliis may 

DOS Primer 

For practical purposes, ail 5'/i inch 
floppy disks :ire the s:tme — until tliey Lire 
formatted by a disk drive attached to a 
computer llien tilings get complicated. 

In tiie US. iilone there are several ^'er^■ 
diflerent formatting systems in common 
use. One. called C;P/M, is used b\- Kiiypn), 
Osborne, ;uid sevenil odier bnuids. An- 
other somewhat more recent s\'stem 
caUed MS-DOS is used b\- tiie IBM-R] 
and PC-compatibles. Tliere are otiier s)'s- 
tcms, ;us well, including the Commixlore 
GCR s-jstem. 

Commtxlore, CP/M itnd MS-DOS disks 
arc formatted so diiferently that most or- 
din;iry ttisk dri\'es c:ui read and write 
only one Ibnnat and neither of the oth- 
ers, llie Commodore 1571 drive, how- 
ever, is so "intelligent" diat it can read 
and write bodi nati\"e Commodore disks 
and CP/M disks. .As it comes fix)m die tac- 
ton; liowever. it cminot m;ike .sense of 
MS-DOS disks. I lere's a brief intrtxJuction 
to these tliree disks formatting and oper- 
ating sv'Stcn^s. 

Commodore 

Commtxlore drives employ a methwl 
of fomiattiiig di.sks called Group Ccxle 
Recording — CXR for short Tliis metliod 



The Big Blue Reader 
overwrites the 1571 
ROM with 
instructions that 
enable it to make 
setTse of MS- DOS. 



suggest why tlie disk blocks not used b\' 
tile progriims are filled widi the text of 
I^iul's letter to die Hphesiiuis — listed in 
Ihe Bii^ Blue Reader disk tlirectoiy, mys- 
ticalh' enoLigli, as a eop>nglit notice. 

What the Big Blue Reader 
Cannot Do 

Althougli The Bi^ Blue Reader will 
tnuisfer nearh' :uiy t^pe of file between 
Commodore ;uid .MS-DOS disks, it will 
not allo^^• you to nui IBM-PC; programs 

arranges the 35 tracks on each side of a 
disk into four groups. Tracks in die ga)up 
near the outside of a disk, haxing a great- 
er circumference, c-ui store more cLita 
than can tracks closer to die center of die 
disk. Therefore, those outsitle tracks :ire 
assigned more sectors tli;ui inside tracks. 
On Commodore 64 :uid 128 disks, tlie 
outside group (tracks 1-17) has 21 sec- 
tors per track, tiie .second group (tracks 
18-24) has 19, tlie tliird (tracks 25-30) 
has 18, and the inside gmiip (tracks 31- 
35) has 17. 

But because tlie disk spins at a con- 
stant rate (about 300 rpm), the drive 
must \'ary die rate at which (.lata is sent to 
each different group in order to keep tlie 
den.sit)' of die recorded data nearly die 
s;uiie on ;ill tracks. Commodores GCIR 
recording rate \"iries fn)m 250,000 to 
307,692 bits per second, v\ith die fastest 
rate used for the outside gnitip of tracls. 
The second side of a dotible-sidcd disk is 
formatted in die same m;inner as tlie first, 
except that the tracks are numbered 
fi-om 36 to 70. 

After a Commodore disk lias been for- 
matted, writing data to it begins at track 
18 of die first side (side 0), pn)ceeds al- 
ternately outward ;md inw:irtl one track 
at a time until diat side is tlili. If it's a dou- 
ble-sided disk, the process continues on 



on your Commodore 1 28 or \ice versa. 
Tliis is Ix-causc die two computers use 
such diflerent microprocessors diat pro- 
griuiis written for one will not am on die 
odier e\'en though 'The Bifi Blue Reader 
can copy dieni. ('Hie oiil\- exception is 
BASIC prognuiis, noted abo\'e ) 

Also, TIk' Big Blue Reader c;innot copy 
CF.'M file-s— it A\()n't e\en read a CP/M di- 
rector)' because CPM is so different 
from MS-DOS. e\en diougli Uiey ixjth 
use IB.M System-34 formatting (see the 
sidebar tor more on diis). 

Evaluadon 

The Big Bine Reader does exactly 
what it's advertised to do, and it's easy to 
u.se. 1 can think of only two impro\'e- 
ments for it. One would be the abilitv' to 
erase files fnini MS-DOS disks ;uid the 
other, to copy an entire Ct)mmodore 
disk onto ;ui MS-DOS disk in one oper- 
ation, and \ice \ersa. 

1 hardh' need mention how usefi.il The 
Big Blae Reader is ;uid Ikw clearh' it 
demonstrates die \ersatility of die 1571 
disk drive. It's one of die most powerfiil 
utilides available tor Lm\' computer 

the odier side (side I ). This allows die 
first side to Ix.- read by a 1 54 1 di,sk dri\e. 

CP/M and MS-DOS 

CP/M and MS-DOS lx>di u.se a format- 
ting system called IBM System-34. Tliis 
refers to a method for constructing 
tracks on a disk, in diis s^^tem, unlike 
Commodore's CiC'R system, tlie record- 
ing rate luid die number of sectors per 
track are constant, but the data densiU' 
varies, depending on die circumference 
of the track. Two different recording 
rates are common: single-density at 
250,000 bits per second :uid double-den- 
sity at 500.000 bits per second. Also, 
there are boxli single-sided ;ind double- 
sided tbrmat.s. lliere ;ire 40 tracks per 
side and ( conimunh' ) eidier eiglil or nine 
sectors jier track. Writing begias at track 

1, side 0; and in double-sided disks 
s\\itches to track 1, side 1; then to track 

2, side 0; tnick 2, side 1 ; and so on. 
Tlierc LS :il.v) die matter of timing, or 

s\'nclironiz;ition — die \va)' a disk dri-ve 
tells which sector is under the read-write 
head at any particular time. IBM System- 
34 uses die small index hole neau" die 
center of die tlisk to keep track of die ori- 
entation of die disk, tlius iiUowing die 
drive to tell wiiat p:irt of die disk is ix'ing 

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SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



Gnome Kit 

Computer: Q)nini<xlorc 6^. 
Commodore 128 

Publisher: Kira Corp. 

P.O. Box 1 29 
KutytowaPA 1955U 

Medium: Disk 

Price: .^9.95 

Xf you do any programming at all, 
Gnome Kit should put a spark in thost- 
sleepy strccn-struined eyes, lliis disk- 
based utility kit is packe-d with hclji: a 
dozen BASIC programming ;iids: a ma- 
chine-language :LSScmbler'dLsa.sscmbler: 
and a disk facility tJiat gives you direct ac- 
cess to tiie di.sk drive's memon' ;uid each 
sector of a disk, \11 tJic tools are tnui.sp;ir- 
ent to programs stored in tlic computer's 
memory (so they don't interfere with 
normiil system operations ) and are \er\' 
c"Lsy to access. If vou d(j a lot of pix)gram- 
ming, it citn save you hours of progr.un- 
ming ;intl debugging time. 

The single program disk contains a 
version of Gnoinc Kit for botli tlie Com- 
iiKxlore 64 and 1 2H. So whetlicr \'ou are 
using BASIC 2.0 (tlie 64's language) or 
BASIC 7.0 (tlie 128's kmgiiage), the same 
utilities :irc at your fingertips. At first I 
questioned the usefulness of these ;iids 
for the 128. since BASIC ^.0 already 
boasts a machine-language monitor, 
HHLP key and lunctions like renumber 
auto director}', direct disk commands 
and delete lines command. So I figured I 
would use tlie kit only when I w:ls writ 
ing a pn)gnun using my 64, 

But 1 quickly discovered 1 w;ls wn)ng. 
/Vftcr mastering tlie utilities' simple com- 
mand stnicmres, it didn't take long to de- 
velop an addiction to Gnome Kit's povv- 
erflil eomniiinds which arc in most cases 
more powerftil tli:ui tliose built into tlie 
1 28. BecaiLsc all die comm:uuLs are iden- 
tical regardless of which computer is 
used (64 mode or 128 mode), it m;)kes 
sense to use tiiem all tlie time. 'Ilie [iro 
gr;im also includes several impressive 
commjinds not inckidetl in BASIC 7.0. 

The pnjgrams ;ire unpnjtectcd, so you 
can backup tlie utilities on ditFercnt disks 
for your own use, I placed the 6-i version 
on tile two disks I u,se while developing 
new programs using BASK; 2.0, and tlie 
1 28 version on the disks I use when pro- 
gr:imming in 128 mode. TliLs me;uis 1 




never have to seitrch for tlie originiU pn)- 
gnim disk, juggle disks to get ready to be- 
gin, or v\orrv' about being witliout die 
utilities if a copy is d:imaged. ln.stea(.l. I 
simply slip my work disk into the drive 
:uid liegin. 

But perliaps the most hclpfiil feamre is 
direct help Irom Kira. If you have a proli- 
leni using tlie utilities or have a pn)gr;mi- 
ming question, help is just a phone call 
away via tlieir direct help line. I called 
tlie number twice during testing tlie pro- 
gnuiis for diis revic'vv. ;uid in botli in- 
stances, Janet Brito returnetl my calls 
witli ;ui5wers or suggestions. 

Each Gnome Kit version contains 
three separate programs: BASICS aid. a 
macliine-huigiiage assembler and disk fa- 
cilirv'. To siniplif}' tlie review, I discuss tlie 
utilities when used on a Commtxlore 64 
onh'. Evervdiing is tnie tor die 1 28 ver- 
sion LLs well tinlcss specifically exem]>tetl. 

When tile progr;uii is first loaded, you 
load either die BASK!! prognimming aicLs 
:ind the machine-language assembler or 
tlie disk fiicility. Bodi tlie BASIC ;uds ;uid 
die machine-liuiguage assembler coexist 
in tlie computer's menuirv' at tlie s;uiie 
time and can Ix; accessed freely witliout 
dumping any portion of the system's 
nienion-. 'lliis meims that you c:ui dev^el- 
op liotii a BASIC pnjgnun :in<.l a machine- 
l;uiguage pnignim at die same time, 'Ihis 
;tmuigenient niiikc^ it cas)' to develop 
md test B/\S1C pnjgr;uns tliat use ma- 



cliine-hmgiiage ,subroutines widiout hav- 
ing to toggle memories or save ;uid re- 
place programs from disk. 

'Hie BASIC commantls thiiiGnonieKil 
places at die progr:mimer's beckoning 
include delete line nuiges, display disk 
directon'. enter disk command, load'ap- 
pend programs, quick save, mei^e, trace 
with eitlier wiirmstart or coldstart, help, 
renumber prognun lines, auto line num- 
bering, find (viuiables, text, commiuids), 
:ind dump variables. 

If you are a 128 user, diose commands 
mav' not overly impress you. since most 
are included in B/\SIC; 7.0, but 6-1 users 
will probiilily water at tlie moutli at the 
Uiouglit of having such helptiil aids di- 
rectly accessible in BASIC 2.0. But :is 
hard as it may lie to believe (except for 
the trace conim;uid). all of Gnome Kit\ 
conim;uids arc more powerfi.il and hel(i- 
ftil th;ui the 128's built-in commands. 

1-or instance, when a BASIC ~.0 pro- 
gram runs into a problem, the 1 28 user 
can press die help key ;md the screen 
will displav' tJie emuit line ;ind higliliglit 
tlie genenil iirea of tlie problem. But die 
Gnome Kil'a help is al.so automatic. If ;ui 
error (Kxurs, die problem line will be in- 
stantly displav'cd with die cursor blinking 
on die error's location. .So to conx-ct ;uitl 
replace die line, :ill vou need do is tvpc 
tlie correction and [iress RintltN. BASIC 
7.0 requires you first press die help key 



38 MARCH '87 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



tlicn ILst die eiTiUit line ;uid correct it. 
Both arc powerful aids, but I found 
Gtumie Kit faster ;uid easier. 

M\' favorite command i.s "lind." I'w 
used a similar [iiiblic domain pi'ogram for 
y«irs to liclp mc locate iirogramming 
problems, and wils dLsapjxjinted when a 
versitjn was not included in BASIC 7.0. 
Tliis comriKintt is cspeci;ill\ liciptiil when 
ycxi tlccitlc to finish a program you've let 
collect dust on a shelf for some time — 
and you can't remember which variables 
you've already used or w;uit to locate a 
specific command or text string. 

With the find commacid you can 
quickly kx:atc tlie occurrence of a specif- 
ic variable (A S, B% , NAME S ), text or BA- 
SIC command. The command works 
similiir to die sc;irch comm;md which 
most word proces,sors include, Wlien is- 
sued, each line matching die find argu- 
ment is displayed one iifter anodier Or 
the lines can be tliimped to die printer 
instead. In fact, OLitput liom ;ill ofGnonw 
Kifs comniiuids c:ui be redirected to die 
printer, disk drive or :uiy odicr connect- 
ed de\'ice. Iliis allows you to store data 
on disk. 1 lowe\er, most users will prefer 
the printout option. 

Even the renimibcr command goes 
bcvond B.'\SIC "'.O. '^bu c:ui renLimiier 
die entire progrmn, selected blocks o( 
lines, or restructure die progr;im. lliis 
restructuring option lets the progr:mi- 
mer k)gic:illy arrange subroutines for ei- 
ther muTc clarity or increased speed. 
What this means is that a sidiroutine 
wliich is buried somewhere deep in a 
program can be renumbered and re- 
strucaired to appe;ir near the start of die 
prognmi so it will be executed faster 
WTien the subniutine block is moved to 
its nc"\v location, ;ill die reference lines in 
the rest of die ]>rogr;uii :ire atitomatically 
redirected to die new locatitHi, 

Tlie trace command lets you inspect 
each program line as it is executed. 
Gnome Kit's version of trace displays 
each pn>grani line (not just line num- 
bers) as it is being executed, Tlie com- 
mand works siiiiihirly to die walk com- 
mand of a machine-language monitor 
(\'ou cmi slowly walk din)ugh die pro- 
gram b\- pre-ssing the V£\\ UN key ), 

Anodier plus is die iiliiiirs* to execute 
the trace either from a coldstiirt (reset all 
variables ) or w;innstart (presene ;ill \;iri- 
ablc \'akie-s). In fact, die trace command 
includes ;ui option to dispku' each vsu-ia- 
ble's cli:uiging v;iliie as it Ls encountered 
in the traced line. Tliis dLsplay supplic's 



If you've beett losing 
sleep tracing bugs, 
buntingfor 
villainous variables, 
or reconstructing 
subroutines by handy 
you need Gnome 
Kit — ifs a 
programmer's 
salvation 



die progriurimer importiuit infbmiation 
needed to test a progr;uii's accurac)' ;ls 
well ;ls detect difficult-to-catch program- 
ming bugs. Again, this infonnation c;ui be 
R'directed to die ]>rinter if need be. 

llie merge command lets \()li niet^e 
programs stored on disk widi diose in 
memory. This merge does not require 
diat the lines of the disk program be 
iiiglier di;in diose of die one in niemorv' 
;is is tnie widi most nieige aitLs, In tact, 
the lines can mix regardless of their 
numbers, but if two duplicate line num- 
bers exist in bodi programs, the disk- 
stored program line will replace the 
nieinor)- line niiiiiher 

'llie meige conuiiand's ix)wer is ex- 
panded by Gnome Kit's unique save 
conimiuid. The save comnKind works on 
diree unique levels; straiglit sa\'e (save all 
of die basic; prognini ); menior\- kx;a[ion 
sa\"e (save data in specific niemoPi' loca- 
tions norm;iily ibr graphics or machine- 
kmguage programs )i and block save, 'llie 
block sa\e, combined widi merge, gives 
the programmer a pow^erllil constmction 
tool. The bhjck save saves a specific 
block of line's ( tide screen, subroutine ) to 
disk. Ilien using merge, you are able to 
quickl}- construct new programs using 
the Siuiie routines :uid line numbers. An)- 
programmer will appreciate the time 
s;tved by diLs error-free transfer as well as 
the consistency it gives pnjgranis. 

Gnome Kit's assemblcr/dis;tsscnibler is 
similar to the 128's budt-in machine 
monitor. Both :ire fine for assembling 
small machine-language programs or 
subroutines to be acti\ated from BASICS, 
but neidicr contiiin the powerful control 



of a tledicated macro assembler like/V/«-- 
lin or Pal which ;illov\- comment lines 
iind lalx'Ls. But on die odier liLUid, be- 
cause cikIc isenteretl directly, there is no 
down time vv;uting ktr die assembler to 
translate instructions, or need to save 
source code to di.sk. The program gives 
\'ou direct access to both die Ms ;uid 
128's iiiemon'. 'llie biggest adviuitage of 
Gnome Kit over die 128's built-in moni- 
tor is diat both 64 and 128 versions ;ire 
idendc:il, so if \ou arc doing any ma- 
chine-language programming on both 
systems, dicre is no need to k-ani the 
comm;uids on t\\() different monitors. 

One curious feature of Gnome Kit's 
monitor is diat it defaults to the dcciiiKil 
number .system instead of hexadccinuU. 
The user can freeh' .switch bet%\'een die 
two sv'Stems, but beginning niachine-kui- 
guage programmers niu.st be c;uefril to 
enter the system tlie\' intend to use, 
since 1300 decim;ii and 1.300 hcxadeci- 
m;il are worlds ap;in. But many would-be 
prognuiiniers who ha\e been baffled b\' 
the requirement of using tlie initially 
confiising hexadecimal system will be 
deliglited widi Gnome Kit's optkm. 

One of the macliine-language moni- 
tors nicest features is die abUitj' to as- 
semble text directly into menior\'. '^bu 
can easil)' store data or messages in 
memory, where it c;ui be rec;Uled in- 
standy by a machine-language kx:)p. Odi- 
er powerful aids include machine-lan- 
guage versions of trace, find, insert anil 
delete blocks of niemor\. compare 
blocks ( 1 28 version only ). and block 
copy ;is well us die stiuitLuxl iLssemble 
and di.sa.ssemble options. 

Perhaps die most curious thmg about 
Gnome Kit is diat die ;Ls,senibler is di- 
rectly accessible from B/VSiC, Iliis means 
you c;m simultiuieously work on both a 
bask; and machine-language progr;un. 
In fact, you can hdvc the monitor disits- 
.scmble and alter your BASIC prognun 
while the program lines are still dis- 
played on die screen. 

Tlie final fcauire of Gnome Kit is die 
disk memory fiicilitv". It must be loaded 
scp;mitely into the computer's memor\' 
and will ha\'e limited usefiilness for most 
prognuiiniers. But for diose ready to go 
one-on-one with the dri\es micro- 
processor, who w;uit to create their own 
personidized operating sjsteni. or who 
just need direct access to a specific kx;a- 
tion on a disk, diis was written for dicLii. 

llie two immediate low-level aids it 

Conthuwil on [)}•. IIS 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 39 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



hi;\ii:\\i;d ii'.' makk cioioM' 



Buyer's Guide 
to Mastertronic 



Computer: 
Publisher: 



Medium: 



Commodore 64 
.Mastcrtn)nic 
73HBGiX)VcR():(d 
Frederick, iVlD 21701 
Disk 



VJcttinj; somtoncs attention is one 
tiling, but holding it i.s imodicr \1;iny b;(r- 
gain brand sofc^'arc companies have 
been able to attract initi;U cnmds with 
their pnxlucts' [ov,' prices, but it seems 
few have lx,*en able to (loiirish. Master- 
tronic is an exception. Affortlabilit)' 
miglit be ;ui efiective lure, but in addition 
to this. .\hLStertronic provides colortiil ac- 
tion-packed excitement. Here ;ire higli- 
ligliLs of some of die company's most 
recent prognuiis. 

Pans of our national pxstime will be 
sure to enjoy Slugger ;in arcade simula- 
tion diat interlaces tlie ftimiliar \ideo 
biLseball contest widi some new wrin- 
kles. Viewed from die cheap seals up 
hij^ behind home plate, die field unlolds 
in .-^-D splendor. c(jmplete widi cheering 
fens, waving pennants ;uid a dctiiiletl .sky- 
scraper background. In addition to multi- 
ple pitch selection, ste;iling pick-offs and 
shifting outfielders, players can also 
choose uniform color, bet\veen-inning 
cheerleaders, three different swing 
speeds, and a giant center-field video 
screen. 

Tlie center-field \'ideo screen displays 
a field level side-\ie\\' of tlie ongoing tluel 
between pitcher and batter Tliis \;intage 
lets tlie hitter more accurately judge tlie 
flight of the ball as it approaches the 
plate, helping him pick his .savings. It's a 
cle\er touch tliat adds stnueg\'. 

/\JJ die action is contnjlled b)' a few 
joystick tugs, and the game can be played 
against friend c5r computer foe. 

Representing a more contemponiry 
sport is MiLsterUTonic's/'/ft^l Side Soccei: 
a fiLst and fiiric)us computerized version 
of indoor soccer designed by Ken Cirant. 
Some might remember .Mr. Gnint from 
his two ,\rtworx hockey contc-sts. Skip 
Shot and ItiteniatiniuU Hockey, 

Tlie program offers two (.lifterent ways 
for players to get their kicks. 'Die first is a 
fiall-flcdgcd. ten-minute soccer match. 




The plot has enough monsters, 
mazes, penis and puzzles to quicken 
the pulse of even the most seasoned 
adventurer. 



where rwo rival squads nm. dribble, jxlss 
and check dieir way across a scniUing 
grass rink, improvising wave after wave 
of iLssjiults on die oppositicjn's go:ilkeep- 
er. It ;>Lso simulates the pen;ilcv' sh(H)tout, 
a head-to-head duel between shooter 
and goalie diat has long Ixren soccer's 
most inteasc moment. 

llie match consists of five shots lor 
each player, who alteniate lx.'nveen of- 
tease and defense. Vie^ved from the kick- 
er's vantage, tliis athletic guessing g:une 
will t;ike a combination of rellexes, intu- 
ition :uid acrobatics to keep die ball from 
tugging die twine. And even if die ten- 
sion tij htens your vocal chords, the 
computer will be sure to lend die cri.sp 
cr\- of success: "He scores!" 

If te;im sports aren't your ticket, ]xr- 
\\A\y> \ou would prefer to t;ike a giimhle 
wiUi Uis Vegcis Viclea Poker .xndjackpot, 
an addictive disk containing accurate 
versions of liodi these cxsino coin gob- 
blers. Videf) /'oker tests your luck at clas- 
sic live-card draw, reproducing die \egas 
video machine riglit dov\n to die coin 
slot. If vou fancT vourself a card sli;trk. 



diis conte.st is sure to trim your fm.Jack- 
pol brings home the nt)torious one- 
armed bandit, presenting a four-window 
slot machine complete widi nudge and 
shuffle fc-aturc-s. Bodi g:unes make vou 
rc-alize how easv- it is to loose a fortune. 

In .\lAStertn)nic'S;!/rt5to-o/".l/rt^/c. die 
st;ikc'S are a bit different. In diis n)ie-play- 
ing liuitasy, vou must traverse :m unend- 
ing series of undei^vorld dangers in yotir 
search for the mystical [jost .Amulet of 
Immortiilitv-. Tlie plot h;LS enougli mon- 
sters, m;izes, perils and puzzles to quick- 
en tile pul.se of even tlie most seitsonetl 
adventurer. 

But what really makes this program 
iiniciue is die tiered game screen. Tlie 
play lieltl has been divided into diree 
liorizoncil seclioas, ciich responsible (or 
relaving different pieces of \it;tl informa- 
tion, 'llie top level scrvc-s tv^o functions. 
On tile riglit-hand side is an all-text mn- 
dovvn of die action as it transpires; a con- 
tinuous upditting of where vou are. who 
or what you ;tre widi, iind how it ;i]l ;if- 
fects your v\ell-ix.-ing. 

Ilie left half gives you a scrolling over- 



40 MARCH '87 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



head view of j'our surrogate ;ls he searcli- 
cs hi.s cavernous confines for clues to the 
trciLsiire. He ciurics widi liim ;ui evtn- 
diw hiuid-heid PiLsliIiglit. using its limiietl 
bc-am to scour die surnjundings. When- 
ever w creature, prize or obstacle crosses 
tliis ]-)adi of ligln, it is tlien dejiicted in de- 
tailed first-person perspective on the 
game screen's Ixrttom section. It is a suir- 
tlinj> transition, as a virtually indistin- 
guisliahle hloh \'oii ha\e \ie\\ed from 
al5o\e is suddenly gi\'en life. Tliese added 
graphics give tlie game .some much-ap- 
preciated visiiaJ substiuice. 

lUmning acro.ss tlie center of tlie dis- 
play is an options menu, where yon ii.se 
your joystick to ch(X)se wliat action \(hi 
would like to t;ike (run. kjok. pick up). 
Tlie .setup vvorks well, creating imtl in- 
volving a constantly ch;uiging ]ilay fk'kl 
tliat's busy but ne\ero\ei"\\'lielining. 'Iliis 
is one of tlie first in a series of action ad\en- 
tures tising tliis on-.screen amuigement. 

llie ;ircade-style contest has always 
been Mitstertronic's forte, and it is here 
tliat we make tlie final stop of our tour to 
kx)k at Speed King, a new higli-speed 
motorc^'cle racing contest. Snap your 
chin-strap, slip into your gloves and get 
read)' for a ride. l-oUoi^'ing \'()ur bike at a 
low-le\el Ix'iiind-tlie-xeliicle perspecti\e 
popularized by otiier racing cxjn tests, 
you must tlinittle tlinnigli your genu's. 
lemi into the turns. ;uid tr\' to a\oid tlrose 
inevitable collisions to finish ;imong 20. 

Reaching speeds of 250 m]ih, the on- 
nishing visuids will have you gripjiing 
your jo\stick for b;U;uice. .\ thorotigli op 
tions menu lets you mtxiifN' ;uiy race to 
best suit your style. Ten world-famous 
circuits are represented ;ind can be test- 
ed at tliree ditferent skill le\els witli lour 
tlifferent finLshing lap recjuirements. It's 
an e-vhiiarating test of reflex ;uid strateg\' 
tliat will pro\idc endless hours of two- 
wheeling excitement. 

Witli tile \;iriet\ of ch;illenges offered 
by MiLstertronic, it would almost seem 
eertiiin tliat tliis is one compimy that is 
sure to liaN'e sometliing to satisly even- 
one. But you don't have to go by my 
opinion, or :inyone cLses for that matter 
VCitli tlie price lug of 59.99 each, tliese 
g;imc-s are a b:irg;iin. Just go and find out 
for yourself. What have you got to lose-? 

The Infinity Machine 

Okay arcade aficionados, it's time for re- 
venge, fiive me tlie iiiuiie of die one 
C^omniodore game that consistently 
gives you fit.s — diat one ii;trticukirly this- 



By disabling the 
programming device 
called "sprite collision 
detector/' Infinity 
Machine Tnakesyour on- 
screen comtterpart 
virtually invincible. 

trating contest tliai always leaws \ou 
pulling hairs luid gna\\'ing joysticks. l-e;u- 
not, for you shall no longer lie a slave to 
that prognuii. .Assistance has ;irri\ed. It's 
cMc(\ /iif>>u'tr Mtic/.n'iie for the Commo- 
dore 6 I. and chances are it will help you 
to n(H only beat your giuning nemesis, 
but to do so vvitli regularity. And all widi- 
out bre;iking a sweat. 

Tliis re\'olutionar\' nt-w accessory is ;ui 
ordiniUT,' looking c:irtridge diat fits into 
tlie (iommcxJore 6!'s g;une or exp;uision 
port. But what it does is .simply ;uii;izing 
U\' disabling the programmitig de\ice 
called "sprite collision detection" — tlie 
part of the program diat recognizes \-our 
character's fat;il contact widi a mfssile, 
obstacle or foe — it niakc-s your on-screen 
cOLinteipart \irtuaily in\incible. A sword 
to die head, a la.ser to die huU, :uid a va.st 
majorit)' of odicr attacks and pitfalls diat 
in die p;Lst would ha\e signaled tieadi. 
;u'e now rentiered li;uTOless, as if the play- 
er had been ]>laced behind a jirotective 
sliield. \'ictor}- becomes a matter of time. 

"Dirty pool," you cry, "Games were 
never mciint to be played like diis!" And 
on thai ]-H)int. 1 agre-e. 1 wouki certainh- 
not recommend diat diis de\ice become 
a full-time p;irtner in miyone's g;ime plan. 
That would only^ take the ch;illenge :ind 
enjoyment out of play. But tiiis is more 
dian just a cheater's tre;Lsure (antl a re- 
viewers dreiun ). Infinity Machine d(xs 
lia\e iLS legitimate uses. 

For die youngster, diis tool ciui open 
the d(X)r to a whole new libnir\- of soft- 
%vare — pr(.)gr,ims diat had originally been 
purchased for die adult members of die 
ftmiily. I{\en if a htrge chunk of die chal- 
lenge is ;ill but erased from play, it still ill- 
lows die junior audience to participate. 

for die players uninitiated to a specific 
game or gjtme type, Infinity Machine is 
iui ideal orientation aid, letting die new- 
comer get die feel of a difficult contest 
widiout const;uit pla)- stoppages :uid re- 



stiirts. And I'm .sure e\eii die sc",Lsoned 
pro must have at least a couple of thorns 
ill his or her side. 

By prc-ssing a button, this de\ice c;ui 
Ix' turned on ;md oft" during play. When 
the impossible impass presents itself. 
click on the protective shield, walk 
din)ugli uncUiunted and unscadied, and 
ttien pr(x:ec-cl as usu;U. Immortality is at 
hand on }'our (!omm(Klore 6i. 

It should be noted that this c:irtridge 
will not v\'ork oti an)' g;inie diat does not 
use ".sprite collision detection." Experi- 
mentatkjn is just aliout die onh' v\'ay tt) 
check ii Infinity Machine w'vW kick in on 
:uiy p;irticul;u' ]')rogi";im. .Vly success I'ate 
h;Ls been around 50 percent. 

r\'e overcome a hc"ap of ni}' old \'ideo 
stumbling blocks (including my main 
nemesis, Ipx'x's Liiitly-named Inipossih/e 
Missir/n ), ;ind chancc-s ;uv this accessor)' 
will S(X)n become your closest ;JI\'. And 
widi its reiLSonahle price ( S2-i.99), re- 
venge has never been sweeter. 

Two-on-One Series 

What could Ix' better than picking up a 
Mastertronic ]:>rogr;uii for untler ten dol- 
hirs? \\liy, picking up Ihyj .VlasterU'onic 
programs for imder ten dollars, of 
course! 

Just when j'ou're convinced tliat their 
S9.99 price bre:ik is die greatest enter- 
tainment packiige around, .Nkistertronic 
releiLses what they've Ltgged die Two-on- 
One .soft\\'are series, a group of single 
disk paclwiges diat contain not one. but 
two different arcade programs. The 
price? Get diis — S5.99! 

Mastertronic is marketing diis series 
under the Gamcware label. I recenth' 
had die chiuice to take a look at the line's 
initial three offerings, an impressive 
group widi a Ix-avy itrcade shuit. 'Ilie se- 
lections have been p;ured according to 
g^uning st)'le, a gesmre diat tries to insure 
diat a prospective buyer attracted to one 
contest will niore di:ui likel)' be interest- 
ed in die (.)dier 

for tans of die junip-and-climb ch;il- 
lengc. Gamewiire presents Excalilxi ;uid 
Iii}> Mac. two solid and enjo)iilile rellex 
tesLs, In ILxcaliha )'ou are cast as a te;ir- 
less kniglit who must attempt to clear a 
multilevel screen of assorted relics, 
while avokling die fatal touch of ;ui e\'il 
v\-iz;ird and his merciless minions. Quick 
diiiiking ;uid cjiiicker ninning will spell 
victory as you sprint up. down and 
:in)und a v;iriet)' of pla)' fields, 'Flic occa- 
(jinliiitivtl on jin- IIS 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 41 



JMonitor Sale 



14" RGB & COMPOSITE COLOR MONITOR 

Three moniiors in one ! Allows fhe use of C- 1 28 and C64 computer modes 
-composite and 80 column RGB mode. Must be used to get 80 Columns in color 
with 80 column computers. Specialty designed for use wtih the CI 28's speciol 
composite video output, plus green screen only option switch. (Add $14.50 
shipping and handling) 




00* 

List $399 




SALE 

Super High Resolution 



12" 35MHz GREEN OR AMBER MONITOR 

This new 80 column, 1000 lines at center, high resolution display monitor is 
precision engineered to give you the best high resolution screen possible. The 
35 MHz Bandwidth allows use with IBM® ond Apple® computers. The 
comosite screen is non-glore which makes it easier to read by reducing eye 
strain. Monitors come in green or amber color screens, Fontasticfor business I 



Gre«at for IBM®, Apple®, Lasw®, 
Atari® & Commodore® Compwtors 



SALE 



$99 



00 



List $249 



13" COLOR DISPLAY MONITOR 

This all-purpose 13" color display monitor accepts on NTSC composite signol 
and will work with a wide assortment of today's personal and professional 
computers. It generates crisp, easy-to-read alphanumeric or graphic display 
through the use of a slotted .nask, black matrix quick start picture tube. This 
versatile monitor o'so has a built in audio amplifier and speaker with volume 
control, a 1000 character display copocity, and on all plastic cabinet for 
portability and easy cleoning. (Add $1 4.50 tor Shipping and Handling) 



,^^ 



SALE $ 



179 



95* SALE 




-'^^^fc/ 



List $329 



Premium Quality 



liil 





I I I 



■ riosT 

I K\Ktft OS^t i-Af^n 
I ALDKuJijtiiC j--i-;^ 
4, AUlO««SiCi|vr ;T.-vfMf. 



1 "rttiCWJl. tO".|*TJIEIVTV DI5P1AY JtmilON iHlTCIl 



TV TUNER CHANGES MONITOR INTO TV 

Increase the value of your monitor by turning it into a television when your not 
computing! Elegant TV Tuner with dual UHF/VHF selector switches goes 
between your computer and monitor. Includes mute, automatic fine tuning 
and computer/TV selector switches. Inputs included for 300 ohm, 75 ohm, and 
LIHF. Can be used with cable TV and VCR's. Fantastic Volue. Limited 
Quantities. (Includes loop antenna for UHF & RCA connection cables) Add 
$3.00 shipping and handling. Plus $3.00 for APO/FPO orders. 



Fantastic VaSuo SALE 

' C64/Aiari Composite Cable S9.95 • C128 RGB/ Composite SO Column Cable$19.95 



$49 



List $99.95 



15 Day Free Trial • 90 Day Immediate Replacement Warranty 

• LOWEST PRICeS • BBST SERVICE IN U.S.A. • ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL • FREE CATALOGS • 



[ 



Add S10.00 for shipping, handling and insurance. Illinois residents please add 
6'/3% tox. Monitors can only be shipped to Conlinentol U.S. oddrats«3 only. 
Enclose Cashier Check. Money Order or Personal Chock. Allow M days for 
delivery, 2 to 7 days tor phone orders. I day express mail. Prices S Availability 
subject to chonge without notice. No Monitors APO-FPO. 



VISA— MASTERCARD— CO, D, 



C.O.D. ON PHONE ORDERS ONIY 



We Zyove Our Custoiners 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

(3 1 a) 382-5244 TO ORDER 



Famaus IS^tianal Hriind 




NLQ 180 



Hi-Speed Printer Sale 

1 65^ : } 80 CPS • Near Letter Quality • 

Lifetime Warranty 

.2 1 99»» 



Wholesale 
Cost Prices!!! 



List $499.95 



Fantastic 
Price 



60% OFF LIST PRICE 



...^^^^^ 



"^'ot/se 




NLO-180 Premium Quality Printer 

Near Letter Quality Selectable From Front 

Panel Controls • High Speed Dot Matrix* 

Letter Quality Modes • 8K Buffer frees up 

computer 4-times faster • Pica, Elite, 

Italics, Condensed • Super Graphics • 

Business or Personal • Tractor/Friction • 

-^<o^\*, 15 Day Free Trial • Lifetime Warranty on 

'* Print Head* • 6 Month Immediate 

Replacement Warranty • 

NLQ-180 Print Samples 



^^^^♦^ 



Th 


is is 


an e 


xamp 


ie of ITALICS 


e: 


n I-i sl 


n c: 


ecd 


Boldface 




CondensEd Text 




Double-stri ke 


ex 


ample 


of Near 


Letter Quality 



Lifetime Warranty* 



APPLE — ATARI — EPSON NLQ 1 80 SPECIFICATIONS IBM — COAAMODORE — ETC 



Print Buffer 

8K bytes utility buffer 

Printing Direction 

Text Mode — Bi-directional 

Graphic Mode — Uni-directional 

Interface 

Centronics type parallel (8-bit) 

Paper 

Plain paper, Roll paper. Single sheet 

Fanfold, Multipart paper; max. 3 sheets 

(original plus 2 copies) 

Character Fonts 

Pica, Elite, Italics, Condensed 



Printing Method 

Impact dot matrix 

Printing Speed 

160-180 CPS at standard character printing 

Printing Characters 

Standard 9x9 dot matrix 
NLQ 12 X 18 dot matrix (33cps) 

Character size; 2. 12 x 2.8 mm (standard) 
Character sets: Full ASCII character set (96) 
32 International characters 



INTERFACES 



Ink Ribbon Cartridge 

Ribbon Life: 3 million characters/cartridge 
Physical Dimensions 
Size: 15" x 12" x 5" 
Weight: 12.7 lbs. 
Maximum Number of Characters 

Standard: 10 cpi 80 cpl 

Standard enlarged: 5 cpi 40 cpl 

Elite: 12 cpi 96 cpl 

Elite enlarged; 6 cpi 48 cpl 

Condensed: 17 cpi 132 cpl 

Condensed enlarged: 8.5 cpi 66 cpl 

Condensed elite: 20 cpi 1 60 cpl 



Atari $39.95 Apple $49.95 Commodore $29.95 IBM $49.95 Laser $19.95 



Add S10.00 lor shipping, handling, and insurance, Illinois rosidenis please odd 
6 Vj •/. sales tax. Add 20.00 for CANADA, PUERTO RICO. HAWAII, ALASKA. 
APO.FPO orders. All orders must be in U.S. Dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO 
OTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA. Enclose Cashier Check, Money Order or 
Personal Check. Allow 1 4 days iof delivery, 2 lo 7 days lor phone orders. 1 day 
express mail. Prices & Availability subi&ct to chonge without notice, 

VISA — MASTER CARD — C.O.D. C.O.D. on phone orders only. 



We Love Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington. 

3 1 2/382-5244 t< 



inois 60010 




SALE$159.95 



List $249 



BIG BLUE PRINTER 




This is the affordable printer 
you've waited for! S'/i" letter 
sire, 80 column dot matrix, heat 
transfer printer features upper 

and lower case, underline, 

graphics, word processing, and 

much more. 

SALES 39 95 

List $199 



PRINTER & 

TYPEWRITER 

COMBINATION 

Superb Silver Reed letter quality 

daisy wheel printer/typewriter, 

just a flick of the switch to 

I interchange. Extra large carriage, 

typewriter keyboard, automatic 

margin control, compact, 

lightweight, drop in cassette 

ribbon! Includes Centronics 

Parrallel Interface 

sALE$i7995 

List $299 



160-180 CPS 
N.L.Q. 180 
PRINTER 

This printer has a Near Letter 

Quality button on the front panel. 

I No more turning the printer on and 

off. The 8K buffer will free up 

your computer four times faster 

I than conventional printers and the 

high speed will keep you 

computing more than printing. 

Super graphics along with Pica, 

I Elite, Italics, and Condensed print. 

Lifettme Warranty on Print Head 

plus 6 month immediate 

replacement warranty. 



List S499 



COMSTAR 1000 
PRINTER 




Print letters, documents, eel., at 

100 cps. Works in Near Letter 

Quality mode. Features are dot 

addressable graphics, adjustable 

tractor and friction feed, margin 

settings, pica, elite, condensed, 

I italics, super/subscript, underline 

I & more. CBM Interface Included 



SALES 199^00 ■ s^^^*179.95 



List $349 



• OVR WAKRJkMTir 

All our products carry a minimum 90 day warranty 
from the date of purchase. If problems arise, 
simply send your product to us via U.P.S. prepaid, 
We will lAAMEDIATELY send you a replacement at 
no charge via U.P.S. prepaid. This warranty proves 
once aqain that... yy^, / ^„^, o^,,. CiisUmwrs: 



1571 DISK DRIVE 




13" COLOR 
MONITOR 




High Resolution, 1000 character 

display, with built in audio 

speaker with volume control. 

|SALE$179 95 

List $329 




SALES 259.95 



List $349 



TV TUNER 

Now switch your computer 

monitor into a television set with 

the flick of a switch.This Tuner 

has dual UHF/VHF selector 

switches, mute, automatic fine 

tuning and computer/TV 

selector switches. Hooks up 

between your computer and 

monitor! Inputs included for 300 

ohm, 75 ohm, and UHF. 

SALES 49,95 



List $130 



tr* 




14" RGB & 

COMPOSITE 

COLOR MONITOR 




High Resolution, 80 column 

Monitor. Switch from RGB to 

Composite. (C128 - IBM -Apple) 

RGB cable $19.95. Add $14.50 

shipping, 

SALES 237.00 



List $399 



MasterCard 



TO ORDER CALL (312) 382-5244 

8 am - 8 pm CST Weekdays / 9 am - 12 noon CST Saturdays 



VISA 



BEST SERVICE IN THE USA • ONE 

DAY EXPRESS MAIL • 1 5 DAY FREE 

TRIAL • VOLUME DISCOUNTS • 

OVER 500 PROGRAMS • 

CUSTOMER LIST OF OVER 

3,000,000 - LARGEST IN THE USA 



[3 J 21 382-5244 

CALL BEFORE YOU ORDER: PRICES MAY BE 
LOWER & WE OFFER SPECIAL SYSTEM DEALS 



MUSICAL KEYBOARD H 1200 BAUD MODEM 



This sturdy 40 key professional 
guage spring loaded keyboard 
gives the feel and response of a 

real keyboard instrument. 
(Conductor software required) 



SALE $59,00 I SALE $79,95 



List $159.95 



Save tiine and money with this 

1200 Baud modem. It has many 

features you expect a modem to 

have plus 4 times the speed! 



List $199 



COMPUTER 
CLEANERS 

TV/Monitor Screen Restorer & 

Qeaning Kit. EHsk Drive aeaner, 

Anti-Static Keyboard Oeaner 

•Choose any of these three 

computer cleaners for only $9.95 

each! 

SALE $9 95* 

List $19.95 



SUPER AUTO 
DIAL MODEM 




Features on-line clock, dialing 
from keyboard, capture and 

display high resolution 
characters, and much more. 

SALE $29.95 

List $99 



SINGLE SIDED DOUBLE DENSITY DISKS 

.29^ 



lOO"?! Certified JW" floppy disks. UfeUnK 
Wvraiity. 1 Box of 100 $29.00 List $1.99 each 



ACCESS 



ACTION PACK (D) »!♦.« 

LEADER BOARD (D) 13.95 I 

I-EADER BOARD COURSES (D). . . U.»5 

MACH 5 (C) I».»S 

MACH 12B (Q J*.»5 

TENTH FRAME (D) U.9S \ 




SUPER HUEY II (D) 1U.»S I 

TALLADEGA (D) M.«S P 

BEYOND PORBIODEN FOREST (D)W.tS 



DATA EAST 



ACCOLADE 



ACE OF ACES (D) SII.M 

DAM BUSTERS (D) ll.M 

FIGHT NICHT (D) 1I.»5 I 

HARDBALL (D) 1«.M 

LAW OF THE WEST (D) 11.95 

KILLED UNTIL DEAD (D) 11.95 



COMMANCW ID) tll.»S I 

KARATE CHAMP (D) n.9S I 

KUNO FU MASTER <D) B,9» I 



BLUE CHIP 



BARON (D) 

MILLIONAIRE (D) . 
TYCOON (D) 



.514.951 
. . 14.95 I 
..14.951 



CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTUHO (D> BUS I 

FAST LOAD |C1 IMS I 

MOVIE MOWTER fDI lt*S I 

VOfTEH. CAMK (D) OJS I 

WORLD GAMES (D) ILM I 

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Hints for Fun and UtiMly 



COMPILED BY LOUIS F. SAiNDER 



Mlit'eiy month, we bringyoii a super collection ofcoiHpiit- 
er hints f mm readei'S all over the world No matter what 
your area of intm-est or lei<el of expeiiise, you'll find some- 
thing to make your computer life more productive, more 
intetvsdng or moiv excitinfi. To keep the column Jlfjwing. 
we solicit your sfjort programs, useful programming tech- 
niques compute)- mom hiiUs and similar items cjf interest, 
and lie pay up to SSOfor the items uv select We look for 
new or rvcyclect material that can he implemented with a 
minimum of time, effort and theo)vtical knowledge, and 
that is ofcurrcmt value to Commodore computerists of ev- 
ery kind If you hatv an item that fits the bill, send it to: 

Louis F Sander 

PO. Box 101011 

Pittslntigb. PA 15237 
If you enclose a self-addivssed stamped enivlope, u 'e 11 send 
you our hint-wtiter's guide Readeis outside the U.S. may 
omit the stamp. 



Learning about computing: One of the best ways to in- 
crease yoLir computer knowledge is to go to meetings ;uid 
conventioas where there :Lre otlicr pecjple with interests 
sijnilar to yours. Most cities ha^c at least one C^omniodore 
user group, ;uid attending tlieir meetings can put yt)u in 
touch witlt some valuable computer friends. 

E\en more beneficial are tlie hirge Commodore con\'en- 
tions conducted by such groups as tlie West Coast Commo- 
dore Association. Manufacturers, publishers and softr^'are 
houses exhibit at tliese shows, mxl at tlieir boutlis )ou c;ui 
see their latest prcxluets :ind talk witli people who ;ire really 
in the know. LsuaU)' tlicre iire educationiil lectures as well, 
where you can learn about specific topics that interest you, 
and ask questions that only the experts c;m answer. 

One of the best parts of tlicse shows is tlie ch;ince to meet 
the people \N'hose work jou've seen in print or on-line. At 
one sho^; I got to speak widt Ijouis F. Sander, Jim Butierticld, 
Len Lindsay, Louis W:ilJace ;ind se\end otliers whose anicles 
and programs I've loved. I also met on-Hnc personalities like 



Quantumlink's MISS CIIIKIS and BILL PI. :uid other notables 
like Commodore's Jim Ciracch'. All in all, attending Uiat con- 
vention w;ls one of tlie most exciting things I've ever done, 
iuid I recommend such shows higlih' to e\er,one. 
Becky Cassell 
Glendate, California 



Label printer: Tlie gummed labels with tractor-feed holes 
iire usefijl for more tli;ui m:iiling lists. Printed as .singles, they 
m;ike idcLil address laliels for packages you send tlin)ugli die 
m;til. Printed as multiples witli your own address, tlie)- m;ike 
great return address labels. .Multiple identic:il labels also 
come in hand)' if )'ou send numerous letters to tlie s;une ]XT- 
son. 1 keep a ktrge supply of pre-addressed labels on himd: 
some witli my own return address, some ^\icli tlie address of 
Uiis mag;izinc, and some witli my son's college address. 

The accompiuiying short program Ls optimized for print- 
ing a single address repeatedly on 1 5 16" x 3 'Z^" labels, and Ls 
better tor diat puipose tlian :uiy word processor. Because it 
u.scs u]ipcr- ;uid lower-ciise letters, before t\ping it in, put 
your computer into upper/lower c;isc mode by simulta- 
neously pressing SHIFT and die Commodore key. 

To use the prognim, put tlic de'sircd atldress in tlie six 
DATA lines numbered 301 -.306. If \'our address is shorter 
tlian SLX lines. iLs most of diem are, ]iut spaces or null strings 
into die unused DATA lines. When you nin tlie progr;un, it 
shows you the UUiel it intends to print, giving you a .iiance to 
correct ;my errors. Then it prints a dummy label (tlie num- 
bers 1-6) to help )'ou ;digii your paper Finally, it prints :ui>' 
number of Libels you itsk. 

1 keep scv'er;il copies of die progr;un on one disk, each 
witli one of die addresses 1 use in my 'stock" printed labels. 
Then when I need more labels, I load the approjiriate pro- 
gnun and make diem. To m;ikc a one-of-a-kind label, I load 
one of tile programs. ch;mge the DATA statements, tlicn run 
the prognun, 
Louis F. Sander 
Pittsbuigh, Peimsylvania 



46 MARCH '87 



Continued on pg. 48 



TO THE VICTO 




DEFENDER Or THE CROWN 

NOW PLAYING AT A SOFTWARE DEALER NEAR YOU 



iorthbrooK, If, 



tiinencat u^. (E, 
Illinois; l-312-4a 



.00062,, 
i60Q-445-7982 



i-nMMOiHmf cUi^Omrs 



Continued from pg. 46 



100 
110 

120 
130 
140 
150 

160 



170 
180 

190 

200 
210 

220 



230 

240 

250 

260 
301 
302 

303 

304 

305 
306 



Label Printer 

PRINT" [CLEAR, RVS,SPACE4 ,SHFT L] 
ABEL [SHFT fJrINTER - [SHFT LJ 
OUIS [SHFT F] . [SHFT SJANDER 
[SPACES] " 

PRINT CHR? (14) ;" [DOWN, SHFT T] 
HIS PRINTS ANY NUMBER OF THESE 
LABELS:" 

FOR J=l TO 35 : PRINT" [CMDR 0]"; 
:NEXT:PRINT 

FOR J=l TO 6:READ A$(J) 
:PRINT AS (J) :NEXT 
FOR J=l TO 35: PRINT" [CMDR U]"; 
:NEXT:PRINT 

IMPUT"[SHFT I]S THAT THE RIGHT 
LABEL (Y OR N)";A$:IF LEFT$(A$, 
1)="Y"THEN 180 
PRINT" [DOWN, SHFT C] 

ORRECT THESE LINES, THEN [SHFT R, 
SHFT U,SHFT N] AGAIN." 
LIST 301-:GOTO 260 
PRINT" (DOWN, SHFT A]LIGN LABELS, 

TURN PRINTER ON, THEN" 
PRINT"PRESS <RETURN> TO TEST 
ALIGNMENT. . ." 

GET A$:IF A$<>CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 200 
OPEN 4,4,?:FOR J=l TO 6:PRINT#4,J 
:NEXT 

INPUT" [DOWN, SHFT I] 
S PRINT ALIGNMENT [SHFT 0,SHFT K] 

(Y OR N) ";A$ 
IF LEFT$(A$,1)<>"Y"THEN PRINT" 
[DOWN, SHFT RJEALIGN LABELS, THEN 
[SHFT R,SHFT U,SHFT Nl AGAIN. 
[DOWN] ":GOTO 260 
INPUT" [DOWN, SHFT H] 
OW MANY LABELS TO PRINT" ;N 
FOR J=l TO N:FOR K=l TO 6 
:PRINT#4,A$(K) :NEXT:NEXT 
CLOSE 4: END 
DATA" " 
DATA" [SHFT 



L]OUIS 
[SHFT S]ANDER" 
DATA" [SHFT P]OST [SHFT 
[SHFT BlOX 101011" 
DATA" [SHFT P] ITTSBURGH 
SHFT A,SPACE2] 15237" 
DATA" [SHFT U].[SHFT Sj 
DATA" " 



SHFT F] , 

0]FFICE 



[SHFT P, 



[SHFT A] 



(END 



Easy printer stand: Yoii c:ui niiikc ;i vcn- useful printer 
stand from one of'tlie desk tni)'s soltl at oftiec supply houses 
imd discount stores. Turn tlic tniy upside down, witli its 
opening towiird die rear, iind set \-our printer on ia\-> of it. 
■V'our paper will fit in tlie space benveen the di.sk :uid tlie top 
of tile "printer st;uid"" ( re;ilh' tJie |-)<)ttoin of the desk tra\- ). and 
c;ui be fed out of tlie openini; ;ukI u]i the back of the printer 
These tnt\s are available in a w ide \iiriety of colors, shapc-s 
and sizes, so you should be able to fintl one exactly right for 
)-our needs. Tlic better bnmds come in letter legal ;uid diit;i 
processing si7.cs; the data prtx:cs,sing size is ideal for wide-car- 
riage printers. 
RobeitL Sander 
Saddle Brook, Neu> Jersey 



Double-spaced listings: When jiriniing ]-)rognuii listings on 
your printer it's olten desirable to print them double-spaced, 
'Ilie extra white space makes it e-isier to follow the progrimi 
and provides a place for notes ;uul clKuiges. 

You can ea.sily get these double-spaced listings by giving 
your printer tiJc a number higlier than 12". Tor ex;unple, 
OPEN 128,4 : CMD12H : IJSTwill priKtuce a tlouble-.spaeed 
listing on tlie printer When the printing has stoiiped, reset 
tlic printer b\ executing PRINT# 128 : CL(.)Sl£liH. 
Anna Mae Hertzler 
Boynlon Beadj, Finiida 

Printer DEP switches: If you use a mm-ClominiKlore printer 
and interface witli your system, |-x)tli tliose tinits ;u-e likely to 
liave several tiny .switches tliat must he .set pnjperly for ev- 
erj thing to work riglit. nicy're c;Uled DIP .s-witches (after the 
integrated circuit Diuil Inline P-ackige stiuulard diat tlieir size 
;uid contacts confbmi to), ;uul you can set them with a pen 
point or otlier simihir instrument. Because DIP s^vitches are 
so inipt:)rtant, some words of exphuiation me in oriler. 

DIP switches configure your equipment for difl'erent types 
of operation by dctcnnining tilings such as number of chiir- 
acters per inch, number of s]iaccs skijiixd between lines, ;uid 
.so on. Tlie s'witch settings almost idways have their ellcct 
when ptiwer is first applied to the i>rintcr or interface, so if 
you change tliem vou mu.st turn tilings oft' ;ui(.l back on be- 
fore tlie chaiigc-s take effect. And ;dmost ;ilways, tlie DIP 
switches merely establish tiefaults; softwiux' commantls can 
chiuige tlie p;inunetei>; they contnjl. Such commands ;tre 
usually given by sending .sjx'ciiil contn)! characters t)r escacx: 
sequences to tlie printer. 

Many printing irregularities are the fault of improper DIP 
switch settings. Tliese settings :ire alvvays cov'cred in the in- 
struction manu:il, but are seldom exphiincd in detail. L'siuilly 
there is a simple cliart witlT very brief descriptions of c-ach 
setting. To use vour s\stcm cflFccti\'ely, \'ou should ha\e per- 
fect understanding of these .settings. If you c:ui"t inulerstimd 
them, show your manii;J to a frientl who's knowledgable. 

If botli a printer ;uicl ;ui intcriace :ire involvetl, vou must 
c(X)rdinate the .settings of the s^v itches on both units. For ex- 
iunple, lx)tli will frequently have DIP switches with identicid 
flinctiorLS, .such as adding a lineticed ;ilter a c:u"riage return. If 
you're not careful, v'ou could get two linefeecLs. 

Similitrly, v'ou must c(X)rdinate yotir DIP s^witch settings 
widi die default settings of die softw;ire you're using with die 
printer/interface combination, (ietting three spaces between 
lines? Most likely die software, inteiface mid printer are each 
adding one! 
Kathleen Mead 
WesteiTi'lle. Ohio 

QuantiiniLink file append: During a Q-link on-line ses- 
sion, I often make scvcr.il disk saves of incoming intbniiation. 
Instead of chot^ing a unique fileniuiie for each of diese saves, 
1 give die first one a ver\' simple nmne, such ;ls I'll Ji. Rw sub- 
sequent s;ives on die s;ime session, I use the filename I-1IJ!A. 
'llie comma ;md tlie A cause tlie new information to be ap- 
pended to die end t)f die previoush' created file, and I can ap- 
p>cnd as many times as I want to. 

WTien 1 later want to review tlie information I have saved, I 
only need to rememtx'r one filename — Ml.li. 1 can use my 
word pnx:es,sor to etlit it or to braik it tlown into iliflcrcnt 
dtx;uments. 

If you wanted to get ftinq,', you coitld use a more dcscrip- 



48 MARCH 'B? 



Continued on pg. 50 



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Levine^Chicago Symphony Orchestra. RCA 
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Peter Gabriel: So • Sledgehammer. In Your 
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Vivaldi, The Four Seasons • Pinnock; 
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Linda Ronstadt: For Sentimental Reasons, 
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Bach, Organ Works • Daniel Ctiorzerapa 
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Canadian Brass: High, Bright, Light 
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Prince And Tlie Revolution: Parade • Kiss, 
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Daryl Hall: Three Hearts In The Happy End- 
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HUEY LEWIS 

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Dire Straits: Brothers In Arms ■ 
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John Wlllljmu 

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Bob James & David Sanborn; Double 
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Alabama: Greatest Hits • She And i. Why 
Lady Why, Feels So Right, etc, RCA 120247 



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Henry Mancini 

btThcPmk 



154381 



151758 



Heart • What About Love?, These Eyes. 
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Mozart, Symphonies Nos. 40 & 41 (Jupiter) 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra led by James 
Levine. RCA DIGITAL 104810 

Bizet, Carmen (Film Highlights) • Julia 
Migenes-Johnson. Plflcido Domingo, Lorin 
Maazel conducts. Eralo DIGITAL 154105 

The Judds: Rockin' With The Rhythm 
Have Mercy, Grandpa (Tell Me 'Bout The 
Good Old Days), others. RCA 154265 

Mozart, Requiem • Schreier leads the Leip- 
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John Cougar Mellenoamp: Scarecrow 
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Pavarotti: Mamma ■ Title song, Vieni sul mar, 
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Cini. London D/G/MI. 115310 

Wagner, Orchestral Highlights From The 
Ring • Vienna Philharmonic OrchesiraJSoIti, 
London DfG/fAL 11S426 

Kenny Rogers: They Don't Make Them Like 
They Used To • Titfe song, htcid On To Love, 
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Elvis Presley: Return Of The Rocker "King 
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Horowitz In London • Schumann. Kinder- 
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Phil Collins; No Jacket Required • One 
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154203 



DVORAK 
New World 
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115168 



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CO Club. 6650 E. 30th St. Indianapolis, IN 46219-1194 



- -YOUR SAVINGS START HERE- — 

Mail to: Compact Disc Club 

P.O. Box 91412/ Indianapolis, IN 46291 
YES, please accept my memberstiip in the Compact Disc Club and 
send mettle three CDs I've indicated below for only SI, under the terms 
outlined in this ai3. 1 need buy as tew as two more CDs at regular Club prii;es 
during the next two years.. .wit/ioi/t obligation to buy anything further! 
{Shipping & handling added to each shipment.) 

RUSHMETHESE3 SELECTIONS: (Indicate By Number) 



I am most interested in the following type 

of music — but am always free to choose from 

both categories (checX one only) 

DMR. 

D MRS. 

DMISS 



1 D CLASSICAL 

2 D POP/SOFT ROCK 



Firs! Name 



Iniiial Last Name 



(PLEASE PRINT) 



City 
Telephone (_ 



Zip 



Area Code 

Limtied tonew members: conlinentaJ U.S.A. only; one membership 
pertamily. We reserve ihe right to r^uest additional information 
or reject any application(s). Local taxes, it any, will be added. 



I WBS92 I @ 



Conliiuieil from pg. 48 

tivc RIcnamc, pcrh;i]is including tlic elate. VUS'.yiSJSl or 
QIJ'ILK.V 15/87, tliougli more didiciilt to remember, iire 
much more self -descriptive vi'hen seen in a director* •. 
Rciiijciii Base 
Winnipeg, Canada 

Disk library tips: Most experienced computcrists liave de- 
veloped cert;iin s-)'stems :uid pn)cedures for keeping tnick of 
tlieir disks. Here :u'e some of tlie better ones r\e seen. 

If you can avoid it. never give X\\o disks tlic suiie ID. since 
some prx>grams c;ui lx;eome confii.setl by duplicates, .\ giKKi 
system is to a.s.sign IDs in a fiegular ;iiph;ilx'tic:tl set|uence; AA. 
AH, AC;, AD. ;uk1 so on. Wherever )(ni keep your disks, if }oli 
aLstj keep a card tliai shows tlie IDs j'ouAe a.ssigned to diite, 
you'll easily be d^le to avoid duplicates. 

Reserving certain di.sks for certain categories of programs 
often m;ikes it cusier to find what \()iire Ux)king for, V.um- 
mon categoric-s itre utilities, sound and music, games, and 
word prtK'essing files. 

Put your most-frec|uently-used pn)gnim first on tlie disk, 
wiiere it c-an be loatled by LOAD"'",S or a simihir command. 

lion't tr\' to use all tlie space on a disk, .since joii necxl 
space to updiite progi~.uns ;uid data. Ijeaving 50- UK) blocks 
free Ls wondertlil insiinuice against o\ertlow. 

Keep (jne or two disks on h;ind exclusively for use in pn)- 
gram development, .'Vs you work on ne-w prognuiis, s;ive ail 
your intemiediate versions to one of these disks. 'Hien when 
a prognun Ls finalizeel. ]iut it on a dilferent disk and enise all 
tlie previous versions. 'Iliis saves wear and tear on your g(Kx.l 
disks, imd lessens tlie chance Uiat you'll ruin one of them. 

Print out each disk's directory. ;uul keep tJie hard copy 
close to the disk itself St)nic people tape it to tlie disk enve- 
lope, while otliers keep it inside tlie envelope. Use this pro- 
cedure to make tlie printed directorj-. 

I.()AD"S",8<RI-:il1W> 

OPl-:.N4.4 : C.NID I : LIST <RETl'RN> 
Wait for the printer to finish, then type 

PRir«n"#4 : CLOSE4 <REnJRN> 
Remember, die only leg;il abbreviation for PRIN r# is !' shift 
R 

Lotiis F. Sander 
Pittshutg/x Petwsyitxoiia 

Screen niarking hint: 'llic speci;il m;irking pens matle for 
overhead pn)jector tr;uis]">:u"encies are peifect for making 
tempontrv' m:irkings on your Clf I' screen. Ilieir ink adheres 
nicely to the ^ass ;ind is easilv' renicjved witli a thuiip elotli. 
The Vis-a-Vis'" br.uid, make by Santbrd, is available at ;my 
kirge office supply store in extra fine, fine and broad points, 
LiayS. Tenier 
Alton, Illinois 

TV interference: If v'ou llsc a T\' set rather di;m a monitor 
ft)r v'otir video display, vou miglit have trouble with wavv- 
lines on your screen. 'Ilie key to eliminating them lies in die 
cable tliat connects the computer to the TV'. It should be in 
g(KX.I condition ;uid tot;illy .shielded if jiossible, if your TV is 
set up for ,-^()() ohm iwiii-lead. you should have a ~5-.^0() ohm 
coupler between tine temiin;ils :ukI your computer cable. It's 
often useful to coil die cable and ia|)e it into place. It usually 
hel[-)s if you t;tke tlie TV'/ctjmputer .switch box out of tlie cir- 
cuit, or use some otlier mediod to a'OKJve die 'W :intenna 
connection whenever youre computing. 

Radio Shack and siniiUir stores have a v^•ide lurav of con 



Hectors, cabk-s, .switches ;uid filters for 'A':uid video connec- 
tions, 'Hie store manager should be willing to m;ike some 
suggestioas, 
Harry MenJxtm 
Ross Toumsfjip, Penns}'lvania 

Dead C128: If your C;t28 behaves as though it is tiead, 
you've likelv' blovvTi one of the two fuses in die |xm'er su]')]>ly. 
If the computer doesn't do luiytliing when you turn it on, die 
culprit may be the 4A 1 25\' flisc inside die power supply I3e 
.soirc to unplug evcrvtliing lx.-fore di.s;Lssembling tlie unit, luid 
Ix' Citreflil what you toucli — die intem;d capacitors can hold 
a pretty shocking ch;u;ge! If you turn on the computer and 
tlie drive ;uid printer initi;ilizc but nodiing else works, re- 
place tlie I.6A 250V fiise which is easily accessible from the 
bottom of tlie power supply. 
Al White 
Ltijkin, Texas 
Note : Opening your power supply voids your warranty. 



Division tutor: Viliile tliere are niiuiy pn>grams available to 

tutor children in simple arithmetic, many of them do not 
cover elivision. After tr\-ing to write such a pR)gnuii myself I 
discovered why this is so — it's hard to fincl numbers whose 
quotient is an integer. 

But tJie solution is simple. Since division is die inverse of 
multiplication, have die computer choose two nuidom inte- 
gers and multiply diem togedier 'Hien for your tlivision 
pn)hlem. divide tliat pnKluct by one of the two original luim- 
bers. 'Hie accompiuiying program illustratc"s this. 
Ridxinl L l:l?eiijaidy 
Green Bay, Wisconsi)i 



2 : 

100 


Division Tutor 


i 
PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN] DIVISION TUTOR ] 




- RICHARD L. EBERHARDY[DOWN] " } 




: J=RND{-TI) 


110 


FOR J=l TO 10 


120 


AI=10*RND(1)+1:B%=10*RND(1)+1 




:C%=A%*B% 


130 


PRINT" [DOWN] WHAT I S " ;C% ; "/" ; B% ; 




: INPUT D 


140 


IF D=A%THEN PRINT"CORRECT ! " : E=E+1 


150 


IF DOAITHEN PRINT"WRONG! THE 




ANSWER IS";A% 


160 


NEXT 


170 


PRINT" IDOWN] YOU GOT";E; 




"OUT OF 10 RIGHT, OR" ; E* 10 ; " [ LEFT] 




%" 

(EIM) 



BASIC abbreviations: Your user manual lists short abba-via- 
tioas for most of die BASICS keywords. Merc's a sunimarv' of 
useful information :)lx)iit tliem. 

I'he alibreviatioas iia- notliing more tli:m a convenient 
wav- of entering statements from die kevlnKird. lliev don't 
Silve meniorv; even tliougli diey look like diey shoukl. 

In addition to saving keystrtikes, dieir greatest use is in 
squeezing extra keywords into a screen line. For examjile, 
the C64's screen editor limits line entries to 80 characters: if 
you ;tl-)breviate keywortls, you c:ui get more of tlieiii into die 
line, llie principle works on other Commodore computers 
as well, whedier the screen editor limit is 80 characters or 



50 MARCH '87 



something different. 

When you list :i line that includes :ihbro'i:itcd kc\Tvords, 
the computer exp:mds tiiem to tlicir fiiUy s]>elled form. 'Iliis 
can make the listetl line longer tlian tlie screen editor's Limit, 
but the line will still work perfectly. The thing you can't do is 
edit a line longer tl::m tlic screen editor's limit; if ehimges to 
such a line lire needed, you must enter it again fajm scrateli. 

You can avoitl ha\ing to retype ;m abbre\iated line, by 
making up a dummy line. Number die dummy si it will nev- 
er be executed, and use a quotation mark iLs die first charac- 
ter after tlie line number. Tlien t)pe your regular program 
Statements, including ablireviations. Ilien list tiie dummj', 
which becau.se of die leading quotation m;irk \\ ill inclutle tJie 
abbreviations ratlier Ui;tn Uieir expajisions. imd %\ill tlieretbre 
not exceed tlie screen editor's limits. (Ihangc its line numlxrr 
to the one )'ou want tlie actual line to have, delete the lead- 
ing quotation mark, tlien press RETL'ltN. List die line you've 
just entered, ;md obsene tliat the al>bre\iations have been 
cxp:inded. If you need to edit Uiis line, list die dummy again, 
change die line number and delete die leatliiig quote. Then 
edit the rest of die line and pre.s.s REIl IR.N to enter it. 

It's easier to work with abbrc\'iations if die computer is in 
upper/lower cxse mcxJe, since die abhre\iations dien '^\'on't 
contain hard-to-reatl gnipliic-s. '\bu c;ui pia \our machine 
into tills mode b\' simultaneously pa-ssing tiie SHIFT and 
Commodore ke>s. 

The proper iibbreviation for PRLNT# is P shift R If you tr\' 
to use ?#, die resulting line will /(xik all riglit, but will give a 
syntiLX emir when executed. Simihtr restrictions apply to 
GFr# and INPU r#. 
Jonathan Greer 
T}rane. Pemtsyhrmia 

Abbreviating zero: When a v;iriable is ;LS.signed the value 
zero, such ;ls in die statement N = 0, you c;ui replace the zero 
character b\- a deciniiil point. Tlie computer will inteqiret 
the decimid point its zero and wUJ ev:iliiate die expression 
significiuidy fiister di;ui if you had used die r.KKi. 

Tile tiick \\()rks in tlirect ni<xle as well, \\'iiere it Ls espe- 
cially u.seftil in FOKJ-: statements. If \'ou want to poke a zero 
into location S5281. for example, you can type POKJi 
53281,.— which is e;Lsier to t\pe di:ui i\>KI- 5. "i 28 1.0. 

You can use diis trick whcrc\cr a zero is needed by itself, 
but not when die zero is part of another nimiber, such as 
200. 

Rofxrt Louis 
SaMle BnK)k, Neiv Jersey 

Easy RUN: If you have a program in memon'. you can run it 
very easily by stmultimeoLLsly pressing die spacebar, SHIFI' 
key Lind question mark key. 

Anodier e:Lsy v\'ay is to t)pe in ;uiy letter or letters (not 
numbers or other characters), then simultaneously press 
SHIFT and RLIN/STOP. 
Gtvg Heide 
Great Falls, Montana 

CONT for endless loops: Tlie CONT st;>tcment Ls usudh 
used in direct mtxJe to resume prognun execution ;iftcr a 
STOP or END statement. But it can ;iJso be used in a progriini 
to create ;ui endless loop. \V'hcne\er \-oui- prognun executes 
a CON'l', it will li;uig up until die STOP kc)' is presseti. 
Steiv Macedo 
Lntberi'ine, Majyland 

Conlimied on pg. 53 



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Ups&THcks 

Conliiitwd fiyim I)^,. 5/ 

FOR-NEXT hints: The FOR-NliXT loop is one of BASIC'S 
most uscftil fcatUR-s. Here arc some hints for using it more cf- 
fecti\'ely on ("onimtKJore comiiiiters. 

Renienilx-T t]i;ii tiic kxjp \;iriahlc is initi;Qized before tlic 
loops end is c;dculated. "^bii oui use tliLs to your taietit, es- 
pecially when tine end value isn't obvious. For example, these 
two lines are h;uidled identiciiUy: 

1 00 R )R.| = 19 1 ^2 TO 49 1 ""5 : READ K : POKliJ.K : NEXT 

1 1 !X)r} = 19 1 52 TO J + 21: RIL\D K : K)K!;.I.K : NKXT 
IJne 110 is easier to type ;uiU to understand. Al.st), if you 
waiitetl to ch;uige tlie starting point of your pokes, line 100 
would require yon to recalculate die loop's st;irt and finisli. 
while with line 1 10 you'd only recalculate its start. 

Your pnjgnun .slxnild ne\er exit a rOR-NI'XT loop with- 
out first completing tlie loop. If )ou don't obser\e tliis pre- 
caution, you'll Ix- plagued witli mysterious out of memorv' 
errors. I lere are some examples of the wrong and right ways 
to temiinate a l(X)p. 

100 iy;M WTtoNc; way to qui' 

110 1-ORJ = 1 TO 10 : U' J = 5 THEN GOTO 140 

120 PRINT J 

130 NEXT J 

HO PRINT "WRONG WAY TO QUIT!" 

150: 

2(X) REM Iiic;[ I'l' V^AY TO QLIT 

2 10 l-OR J = 1 TO 10 ; IF J = 5 lliEN J = 10 : GOTO 250 

220 PIUNTJ 

230 NEXT J 

240 PRINT 'RIGI IT WAY TO QUIT! " 
Notice tliat when line 140 is executed, J = 5 ;uid tlie loop is 
still t)[xn. Note how line 210 closes tlie Ux)p by setting tlie 
variable equal to the ma.ximum loop value then executing a 
NEXT 

Alter tlie lotjp has finished, the v;diie of tlie variable is 
cqu;i! to die first value after the loop's end. If tlie following is 
executed 

l(H)l-OR.l= 1 TO 5;. NEXT 

110 FOR K=6 TO 3 S'lTP— 1 : NEXT 

120 PRINT J : PRINT K 
the jirinted values for J and K will be 6 :uid 2, rcj^xtivcly. 
Roger W'ilaxx 
DuiImhk North Camlina 

INT hints: Many BASIC statements and functions automati- 
caih- perform an INT as :in eiirty step in tlieir processing, ;uid 
in tiiose cases, iui INF in )'oiir prognini may be unneces.s;ir\'. 
Here are some tliat I've run aem.ss in my exix-rinients. 

Arr.iv Subscripts .VIIDS 

CFIRS PEEK 

DIM K)KE 

CK)SrB RIGHTS 

CKXI'O SRC 

ij-rrs IAD 

Also, you c-an often eliminate tlie need for iui INT by using an 
integer \ariab!c. as is ,shown by the following, in which A% is 
shown to Iiave a \;i1lic of 3. 

100 A% = 10/3 

110 PRINT A% 
A U.' Chym 
Oxfonl England 9 



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BY R. HAROLD DROID 



Border Patrol 

for the Commodore 64 

x\ (). tliLs Lsn't :i video game involving illegal alieas. The bor- 
der Ix-inj; patrolled here is tile perimeter of your eomputer 
screen. It ereates the s;uiie illusion of nKnement you see in 
some eiectrieal display signs, "^bii fill tlic outer edge of tile 
screen witli a chantcter, tlien change tlie colors at regular in- 
ten':ils to give tlie impa'ssion of movement. Once y(Jii'\'e ex- 
perimented witli iliis a little. \ou e;ui remo\e tlie INPIT 
pnimpts. substitute fixetl \;iliies, ;uid incorporate tliis into 
luiy BASIC program. It's ;ui easy way to add \'isual intere'st to a 
title or menu tlisplay. 

Here ;ire descriptions of tlie prompts and how tlie values 
entered iiJfect die disjilay. 

SHHI:D controls htw fast the border "'mo\es." More spccifi- 
e:dly, tlie niimlx-r \oii enter here is tlie number of sixtietlis of 
a second between "moves." So die prompt, thougli perfecd)- 
descriptive, is a little misleading — lower "speeds" actiutlly 
make die Iwrtler mow fxster. Acceptable values are in die 
nmge of 1-255. 

S<:ri:i-\' c:c)DI: spedties ^xhich cli;tnicter will be used to 
lomi die lK)rder. .Note that Uiese Mi: saveii eotles. not ASCII 
code's. Some cjf die more iisefUi ones iirc code 81. a fiUed-in 
circle; 1 6(). a re\ ersed s]iace; 1 02, a checkerboard pattern; or 
K.^. iJie he-art. 

'llie remaining pnimpt-s let you ereitte a sequence of col- 
ors. 'Piis pattern is re[x-ated arountl the perimeter of die 
.screen. 

NUMBER OF COLORS is die numlx'r of elements in diLs 
serie-s. You can use die sjime color more than t)nce. The 
m;L\innim viiliie here is I 27, 



Before tjping this program, read "How w Emo Pfognins" and "How lo L'se ihc Magazine 
Enm Pnigram ■■ Thr HViK! progomi in this magazine arc svailabie on disk from Loadsui. 
P.O. Box 30007. Shro-qjofl, U 71 1.WXMT, I 800-83l-269i 



Border Patrol 

20 SUM=0:FOR 1=49152 TO 49371:READ J 

:P0KE I,J:SUM=SUM-i-J:NEXT' JGTL 
30 IF SUM031532 THEN PRINT"ERROR IN 

DATA" ;END'GJWI 
40 INPUT"SPEED";N:POKE 49377, N'CKUE 
50 INPOT"SCREEN CODE";N 

:POKE 49378, N'CKIH 
60 INPUT"NQMBER OF COLORS", -N 

:POKE 49379, N'CKFJ 
70 FOR 1=1 TO N:PRINT"COL0R CODE 

NUMBER"I;:INPUT X:POKE 49379+1, X 

:NEXT' ISKQ 
80 SYS 49152 'BFMF 
90 PRINT CHR$(147) :END:REM CONTINUE 

ANY BASIC PROGRAM FROM HERE ' ENNR 
100 DATA 76,6,192,76,36,192,120, 

173'BBYA 
110 DATA 20,3,141,220,192,173,21, 




Give your title and menu screens an 
illusi072 of movement 

(X)I.OR CODE lets you enter die colors in sequence. Use 
the s;une code you would use in a I'OKI: statement to ch;mge 
die color of die screen. 

Once inst;dled, diis prognmi requires no funlier attention, 
and die border will move \\iiile a BASIC prognun continues 
to execute. Tlie BASK; pn)gnuii ciui contn)l tlie l-xirder \\ ith 
pokes and peeks; die sjiecific addresses ;ire in tlie program 
listing. 

You c:in stop die motion widi .S^'S 491 55 ;intl start it agiiin 
uith S^'S -19152. S(j if you're tired of tide ;uid menu screens 
that just sit dicre, you c;ui niiike your pnignims move, e\en 
while diey're standing still! g 

3 ' BAQB 
120 DATA 141,221,192,169,51,141,20, 

3'BCYC 
130 DATA 169,192,141,21,3,169,1, 

141'BBID 
140 DATA 222,192,88,96,120,173,220, 

192'BEMF 
150 DATA 141,20,3,173,221,192,141, 

21'BCQF 
160 DATA 3,88,96,206,222,192,208, 

aS'BBGG 
170 DATA 173,225,192,141,222,192,160 

38 'BFFI 
180 DATA 173,226,192,153,0,4,32, 

188'BBNI 
190 DATA 192,173,224,192,153,0,216, 

136'BEEK 
200 DATA 16,238,169,39,141,153,192, 

141'BEOC 
210 DATA 162,192,169,4,141,154,192, 

169'BESD 
220 DATA 216,141,163,192,32,147,192, 

169'BFNE 
230 DATA 40,141,153,192,141,162,192, 

Continued on p^, (h 



54 MARCH '87 



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F3SClr\ating and practical Info 
or the C-12B. SO-col hires 
graphics, bank switching, 
300 pages of useful inform- 
ation Tor everyone. S19.9S 



JIFFIES 



m Ri)i>- 1. miuj:k 



Standard Screen 
Vertical Bar Charting 

for the Commodore 64 

MJwr charts are used to j9~apliically dispki)- stutistics. Al- 
iJiougli bit-mapped plotting oftcrs tlic best resolution, spccd- 
wLse it LS more suitable tor iiiaciiine-kuigiuigc progiiumming. 
R>rtunatcl)'. tlic built-in grapliics available on ihc (Commo- 
dore frt niiike stanttird screen bar charting relativcK- easy. 

I iori/c)nt:J displays have tJie adv;uitage of ne;irly twice as 
ni;my spaces in which to plot a b;ir's \;ilue. Mowever, tliat is 
not acceptable in some applicatioas. A st<x"k price chart, for 
ex;imple, requirc-s \enical b;irs. Tliece ;ire two tjcnenil t\-(x^^ 
of x'erticiU bar charts. In one, tlie bars alwa\s lia\e a lx)ttoni 
v:due of zero (I'igiire 1 ). In the otlier. tlie bars haw botli a 
bottom and top value (Figure 2). 




Figure 1 




Figure . 




Use fractional graphics for better 
resolution 



I'igure 2 has twice as in;iny h;irs ;ls Figure I iK'cause the 
character fonn sc-lected occupies onl\- half a screen column. 
Tlius, c"ach column can be lUilized while still pnniding a sep- 
aration Ix'tween tlie bars. However, it allows only h;ilf-space 
\XTtic~.il resolution where;LS tlie fiill-colunin characters in Fig- 
UR- 1 allow eiglith-space resolution. t)f course, each column 
in Figure 1 could Ix: utilized by ]ir(Kliicing tlie b;irs witli dis- 
tinguishing colors. 

Examining die demonstration pnigram. a tliree-item menu 
selects tlie chiirt type. Ilien tiie lx)ttom iuul lo]-) \;ilues for 
e:ich bar are rantlomly generated and stored in l)'\i ;irray. In 
real apjilicatlons, of course. :ui input iiRitine would be iLsetl. 
Duiing tliLs process, the higlic-st top \ ;ilue found is placed in 
D%(()). TliLs \;iliie is later u.sed to c:Jculate tlie clKul's sciile. 

A'A'i array Ls tlten filled witli tlie sciven codes of tiie charac- 
ters to Ix' u.sed. Screen c(xies :ire useil Ix'cause tlie plotting 
will Ix- acconiplLshed b;' jxiking screen memon-. Hie ;irray is 
first filled witli four codes of tlie hiJf-column cliiiracters its 
shown. ('File element reference is in piirentiicses. ) 




If a fill! -column chart has been selected iastead, the iirray is 
lefilletl witli 16 cixles, ;ls tbllows. It is notetl tliat tlie ecxlc-s 
higlier di;ui 1 2~' ;tre tlie re\erse of tliose to which 1 28 Ii:ls 
been addcxl. 

As die characters show, a \ertic;il space c;ui be resohed !>)■ 
two or eiglit, dqx'nding on die fomi selected, R is set ac- 
cordingly. Note tliat element ( 1 ) or ( 1 ) tluough (7) conv- 
spondingly aprc-sents tlie appn)priate lx)ttom ch:inicter of 
dieir reference. Likewise, (.^) or (9) dirougli (15) hold tlie 
tops ;md ( ) ;ind ( 2 ) or (8 ) hold tlie hill-.space ch;in)cter 'Ihus, 
referencing die ;uTay in ptjking die screen will pnxluce diese 
characters. 

In order for die bars to haw meaning, tlie disjilay must be 
scaled, lor die demonstration, die lirsi and last tliree screen 



56 MARCH '67 



JIFFIES 



(0) (1) '(2) '(3) '(4) (5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


(10) (11) 


(12)(13)'(14)(15} 


H^^v^^ 


^ 




■ 

224 




^^^ 


^^^■H 


224 228 j 239 1 249 226 120 


119 


99 


100 


111 121 

1 


98 248,247 227 

1 1 1 1 



lines arc reserved for text. That leaves 21 lines for chiirting. 
one of which will be liie zen) line, nuis, I r\ = R'2() sets i ]\ 
to tJie higlicst value tliat can be plotted witlioiit exeeedinj; 
tlie top of tile chart. 

lint. ob\ iously, a b;ir's \"alue may exceed that If scj, the val- 
ue each cliiirt line represents will have to increiLse. and tlie 
b;irs" plotted viilues ecjiiiilly reduced to keep the perspective 
correct. Tlius, S% = 1 -l-D%(0)H\' sets S",i to one plus ttie 
nunilxT of times tlie higlicst to]i v:duc exceeds ilie higliest 
viilue tliat can Ix- plottetl. 'Ilicn 1\' = S% 'K sets tlie increment 
value of cadi cli:irt line. Tlic b;ir \ idues are correspondingly 
fectored b\- S% during plotting. 

Now the screen is cleared :md top text line printed. Fol- 
lowing tliat. tlie Vitlue each line represents is ctlciilateil :uid 
printed witli a grid line. (Note tlie senii-colon following 
PRINT PS.) 

llien, die plotting ensues, tn effect, the bar is dravvn by 
plotting tlic liottoni antl top anti tilling in tlie space Ixtween. 
After ;J!, it is die tx)lt<jni ;ind top which niiirk tlie important 
points on tlic cli:irt. I: = U".,— (lNr(B'V. i{)*R) c:ilculaies llie 
beginning value of die factored Ixittom value, leaving E .set to 



tlie appnipriate -array element for tlic liottom ch;iractcr. .\ftcr 
it is plottetl. R is added to B"ii ;tnd spaces plotted up till B"i. is 
no longer less than die tactoretl to]") value (TVu ). 'llien, H'Vi is 
set to T% ;md die toil cli;u-acter detcniiinetl :ls w;is die Ixjt- 
torn, except diat R is atlded to E to access die top chiuactcrs 
in die arraj'. 

The zero line appe;irs on tlie fourtli screen line up fnmt 
the bottom and, to pivserve die dLspla\ed line values, pilo- 
ting will Ix' calcLilated thini die diird column. A kxjk at die 
screen nienior)" map in tlie Usei-'s Ciiikle rcve;ils die corre- 
sponding screen address to be 1866. l-mni diis, adding 1 will 
move die plot one column right ;uid subtracting 40 will 
move die jilot up one line. X'Vi keeps inick of die column Ix"- 
ing plotted. It starts at 1 ;uid is incremented b) 1. w hich is I 
or 2 depending up(;n die cliart selected. \'"i) = B'Vi.R c;tlcu- 
latc-s die line to plot. Thus, the screen address is SA= 1866 — 
(Y%'40) + X%. 

Color memorv' is poked with DC -I- CC. Both variables are 
;uid r«.-.sult in black b;u-s unless du;d color is selected, llien 
IX; is ^, which is c-v :ui. ;uul CC is variexl Ixmeen and I to 

Omiinueil on l>ji. '}'} 



V> 



DOVOUIiOOK^ 
GOODONRAPER? 



Once you load Fontpack 1 
into your GEOS-equipped 
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You see, Fontpack 1 lets 
you feel mean and nasty 
Or mgsncftL. Or calm 
i^m^ ©gMTlLi and 
good And it's great for 
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absolutely cbildi^. 

But sometimes you have 
important things on your 



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So Fontpack 1 comes witli a 
total of 211 Styles that 
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system. 

You see, with Fontpack 1, 
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isijMTiEMEiNiid about your 
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So if you want your 
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The brightest minds are working at Berkeley. 



JIFFIES 



m Ki;N\i:iii diiwisiom 



Dynamic Error Trap 

for the PET, VIC 20, Commodore 
64 and 128 



X hcTf is no error trapping ca]-)aliilin- in tlic HASIC used in 
tilt Commodore I'I"1". \\V. 2(1 and 6 i. If the computer en- 
counters an error in \our BASIC program, an error message is 
printed on die screen ;u:d the program sto]">s. An en\>r trap- 
ping routine not only allcms the program to continue ain- 
ning. ixit ;(ls<) gi\es you control o\er w Inat happens \\-1un an 
ern)r occurs. 

Now you may be thinking. "Wow! W'liat a powerfiil capa- 
bility. It's too had I cant do tliat on my ComnKxlore." But 
now )ou can liave \oiir <wn BASIC error trapjiing n)Utinc! 

\\m ma)' know that it is po.ssihle to trick Commodore 
computers into tliinking thai yon lia\e Cxpctl sonietiiing on 
tlie kcylx)ard h\ a technique whicli is Mjmetimes c;illed the 
d\-n;unic keybo;ird. Tlie secret of this tcchnic|ue is the cen- 
cliaracter keyl:io:u-d buffer Wlicn a program is running, ch;u-- 
acters t\"pcd on tlie kevboard are stored in this buffer until 
tile pn)gnun ends or t!ie\- are pulled out by an VSV\ Tor ( il-T 
stittemcnt. Howc\'cr, you c;ui make the computer think that 
characteiTi were t\pcd on the keyboard if you poke them into 
the buffer, lliis teclinique lias been used to load programs 
and m;ike self modilying jtrograms. 

We CiUi use tliis s;une technicjiie to trap any en-ors and al- 
low tlie pnjgnun to continue running. Usting 1 is a short 
sample progr:im with the error tra]7ping routines tiir the \W. 
20 and Coninio<.k)re 6i. Listing 2 c;ui be used on the PI"I". 

Mere is how it works, 'llie routine at line HOO sets up the 
error trap. Iliis is done by poking (>( )'iX)9(((): and a Rl- 11 li.\ 
into the kc>bo;ird bufler! 'llie POKlv 198.9 tells tlic 6-ii tiiat 
diere :ue nine characters in the keybo;ird bufler ^bu must 
have a C;t)Sn5 .SOO at the beginning of your progrLun to en- 
alslc the trap. 

Once tlic trap is cnahletl, if the program is stu]i]">ed by ;ui 
error tlie computer will think you t)'ped C)()TC)9(H): and 
pressed RiriIRN'. causing it to go to line 900. 'llie colon alter 
tlie ntiiiibcr prevents another syntax eiTor if the ti(yr()90{): 
is printed on the .screen on a line with other text. At line 900 
\ou can put whate\'er \'oii want }-our iirogram to do \\hen an 
error occurs. In this case we simply print I:RR()RTR\PPI;D! 
and go back to line 100. 

Siiice tlie characters in the keyboard biifter are pulled out 
b\' die LNPU'l' statement, \^'e must be carefiil hov\- we hiintUe 
IXPIT. There is a simple LXPLT mutinc beginning at line 
700. "^ou will notice tlie POKH 198.0 in line -(K). Tliis clears 
tlie ke\ho;trd buffer by telling the eomiiuter there are zero 
ch;u-acters in it. ( Ww must al.so cle;ir the buHer before ending 
tile pn)gnun. as in line NO. Odienvi.se the computer would 
GOTO 900 instead of exiting the ]^rogram. ) 

After die input stittement. \\c execute a CiOSlB 8{)0 to re- 
set the trap. It is a gotKl itlea to INPl 'fa string \ariable and 
dien coiiwrt it to a number with the \\\. limction if )'ou 
want a number If y(ju u.se a numeric \"iriable in the INPL'T 
statement, it is po.ssible t(3 get an overflow error wliile \\i\.iv 




Build an error trapping 
capability into your BASIC 
program. 

trap routine is disabled for the input. 

If your prognmi uses the CI'T statement, )-ou will ha\'e to 
take similar measures to diose used t()r IXPl T. 'Ilie trap must 
be disabled so diat the CKT-will not get the traji cli;tracte[-s 
diat ;irc in tlie buffer. After die CiKT, enable the traj") with a 
C.OSLTJ 800. 

^bu niiglit diink diat a problem could arise from errors in 
subroutines, since die trap routine executes a Cit)TO whicli 
leaves die subi-outine witliout a RI-.'II'RN statement. How- 
ever, diis is not a problem, because die operating system re- 
sets die pointers for subroutines when the error is encoun- 
tered, "^ct \;iriahles ;ux' not clearetl, so the \ariables defined in 
die pn)griun will not be distmbed. It is jio.ssible that tlie iia 
ture of die error has disturbed your \'ariables. btit most emirs 
should leave thcni intact. 

To use die error traji in your prognuns, [ust include the 
routines at 800 :uid 900. :uid put die CiOSl :B 900 and POKf: 
1 98,0 in the appropriate places. 

If )-ou have a CommiKlore 1 28. forget e\'erA'diing you haw 
just read, llie 128 has ;ui error trap built into BASIC! Just in- 
clLide diis line at die beginning of your program. 

10 TR-\P 900 
Tliis will tnuistcr execution to line 900 if :ui ennr is encoun- 
tered. At line 900 \()li ciui handle errors in die s;uiie wav as 
in Listing I, except you should replace die GOTO widi 
RI:sl:.\IE lOO. 'Ilie pn)grani will RESL.MF. at line 100. The 
command RESUME NHXTwill resume execution at die next 
statement ;iftcr die statement containing die error 

Tliis wa\- of tra]-)ping ermrs is much more eleg:uit. and cer- 
tainl)- more [lowerful, hut dio.se of us widi \intage Commo- 
dores can still trap BASIC errors widi D\'n:uTiic I-rror Trap. 
Tliis routine will adtl a protcssion;il touch to \-our B.^SIC pro- 



JIFFIESOYNAMIC ERROR TRAP 



gnuns and solve soiiic of tlic problems tliat arise when an 
untliscxnered bug cn)]>s up. It is especially usefijl if \<)u ;irc 
writing large pn)gnuns which will Ix- used b\' otlier people. 
One final word of w;iming. 'Iliis method trapping will not 
work witli IJ/\SK: compilers like li/J'JZ 'lliis is Ix'cause tlie 
compiler will not be alile to compile tlie GOTO900: diat you 
pK)ke into die keyl'X)ard buffer. Q 

More n-ping thU profjani. read "Hm to Emer Prograns" and "How lo Use the Magazine 
Entn- Prognm.' Hit; B.ASiC pmgnms in this magaanc arc aiiilablc on disk from Loadstar, 
P.O. Hox .^0007, Shftvi-pon, IJi -\]i(Mm'. l■800•«SI■269^. 

listing 1 

100 GOSUB 800'BDLV 

110 PRINT"TRAP TESTER"'BAIY 

120 PRINT"INPUT A NUMBER (0 TO QUIT)"; 

'BBME 
130 GOSUB 700'BDKY 

140 IF N=0 THEN POKE 198 , : END ' FIBD 
150 THIS LINE GENERATES AN ERR 

OR! ! ! 'BALH 

699 REM *** INPUT ROUTINE ***'BSOX 

700 POKE 198,0'3FXC 

710 INPUT X$:GOSUB 800'CGUE 
720 N=VAL (X$) : RETURN 'DGOG 

799 REM *** TRAP SETUP ***'BPHX 

800 FOR X=l TO 8'DDBE 

810 POKE 630 + X,ASC(iMIDS("GOTO900 



820 

830 
899 
900 



RETURN "DNEJ 



:",X,1) ) 'ENHK 

NEXT'BAEE 

POKE 639,13:POKE 198,9; 

REM *** TRAP ***'BKSW 

PRINT"ERROR TRAPPED!" 

:GOTO 100'CELI 
DO NOT USE MAGAZINE ENTRY PROGRAM 
WITH THIS LISTING 

Listing 2 



100 

110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
699 
700 
710 
720 
799 
800 
810 

320 
830 
899 
900 



GOSUB 800 

PRINT"TRAP TESTER" 

PRINT"INPUT A NUMBER {0 TO QUIT)"; 

GOSUB 700 

IF N=0 THEN POKE 15a,0:EMD 

THIS LINE GENERATES AN ERR OR!!! 

REM *** INPUT ROUTINE *** 

POKE 158,0 

INPUT X$:GOSUB 800 

N=VAL{XS) : RETURN 

REM *** TRAP SETUP *** 

FOR X=l TO 8 

POKE 622+X,ASC(MID$("GOTO900 

:"rX,l)) 

NEXT 

POKE 631,13:POKE 158,9:RETURN 

REM *** TRAP *** 

PRINT"ERROR TRAPPED !" :GOTO 100 

IND. 



ART COLLECIOR, EDITOR, 

TIMEKEEPER & CARD SHARK 

FOUND STUFFED IN BOX. 



Okay, so maybe we're 
being a little dramatic. But 
when you see how much 
Deskpack 1 adds to your 
GEOS-equipped Commo- 
dore, can you blame us? 

First, there's the 



r^^ 



jj The Icon Editor can 
' I replace your GEOS icons 
with whatever art you've 
created. Or borrowed. 

The Calendar lets 
you book appointments 
well into the year 9999, 



complete with sound effects. 
Deskpack 1. It's not only 
loaded. It's practically 
stuffed with practical stuff. 





JLlh%^ ! 










1 












1 












1 












1 










_ 


^ 



Graphics Grabber. It with full monthly displays and 
runs through clip art a memo reminder. 

And when work 
gets too boring, our 
Blackjack dealer pops 
up to give you a fast shuffle, 



galleries like Print Shop, 
Print Master"' and News- 
room'" and copies them into 
your GEOS photo albums, so 
that you can use them with 
geoWrite and geoPaint. 




To order call 1-800-443-0100 ext. 234 
Deskpack 1 $34.95 

(C-ilifornia residents add 6.S7r sales tax. ) 
$i!.5() US/$5.5() Foreign for shipping imd 
liandliiifi. Allow six weeks for delivery. 

OKnmMiotc IS a trademark o( ti*nti»dr*re El«tiraiiai, Ltd. 

E^nl .Shopis a Iradwrirk o( BttjdcrtHJwJ Soflware. inc- 

frint MasJer c> a Irademaik iit l^is«l Vfvti&. Inc. JicwsiTmm » a 

iradcmaric <if ^inKbcKurt !^>riA-.iTr. inc. (iROS. [>cskp3ok L and 

Hcrkt-fcy SoHwitKs are tndtnanKs «( titrrtu^ky SofUTxk-.. 



DESKPACK1 



H Berkeley 



Softworks 

The brightest minds are working at Berkeley. 




JIFFIES 



lA'llM lilKJWN 



SX-64 Renumber 
UtiUty 



X lus utilin- pn)gram enables the SX-64 to rcniimlxT ;ui ex- 
ternal drive attaclicd to the SX-64 and still h:i\e tile internal 
drive a-main drive #8. 'Hiis procedure c;uinot usually be 
done. Normally yon have to reniimlxrr tlie internal dri\ e ;uid 
leave the external drive #8, whidi can get conflising. 

This utilit\- pnigrani also renumbers l>otli dri\-es to :uiy 
combination t,'ou cli(K)se, ;ls long :» tlie tv\'o numlx'rs are not 
tlie same. Tlie trick Ls to renunilxT tlie interna] i.lri\e witli a 
number you do not intend to use at all, temponirily, iJien a'- 
numbcr the external drive as desired (8-13). You are now 
free to rcnumlx.'r the internal drive -w-itli ;iny number you 
wish except # N ;uid tlie number you use*,! on tJie external 
dri\e. 

'riiis progr.uii w;ls desijjned tor tlie SX-64 to o\erconie re- 
numbering handicaps due to tlie fact tliat one drive is built- 
in. It ma}' be used on iui\- u^o-dri^e s\'stem, howe\-er. No 
changes ^ill need to be made. M)u may wish to elnuige tlie 
title imd prompts, tliougli. 

After t\ping in tlie prognun. just nin it. .Ml you lia\e to tlo 
Ls follow the pnimpLs. Miike sure you sa\ e it before running it 
in case you make a mistake. 

Here's a description of tlie program lines, 
1070: SPS are spaces to clear tlie printed messages. 

Screen colors. C;:ui Ix' chiuiged to your choice, 

(;HR S( 1 4 ) selects Un\'er-c;Lse. 

Reminds you to use only numbers 8-13 for drive 

number choice. 
1 140: Clears keyboard buffer of :my leftover key presses. 
1 1 50: First half of tile IkLsh pnimpt. 

Time delay lor the flxshing prompt. To flash faster. 

k)wer die limit, i.e., for i = 1 to 10 would be \erj- fot. 

Waits for j'ou to press RETURN, 



1110: 
1120; 

1130: 



1160: 



1180: 



4 



Mori; typing these pni^rm. read "flow to Enter Prognms," and "Hw to Use Ihc Mii^izlnc 
Entn' Program." Tbe B.\.S1C prognum in thU nugszine arc available on ikk from Loadstar, 
P.O. Bos 5000", Shro-cpon. U "1 1 MlooO". l-«O0.8?1.269-i. 



SX-64 R«iuniber 



1070 
1080 



SP$=" [SPACE39] " 'BDNG 
TF$=" [HOME, DOWNS, YELLOW, SHFT 
URN OFF [RVOFF, WHITE] "'BDRG 
1090 TN$=" [HOME, D0WN9, GREEN, SHFT T] 
URN ON [RVOFF, WHITE] '"BDIH 
EX$=" EXTERNAL DRIVE" 'BDGY 
POKE 53281, 0:POKE 53280, 0'CPLY 
PRINT CHR$ (14) " [CLEAR, D0WN2, 
SHFT S,SHFT X]-64 [SHFT I] 
NTERNAL AND [SHFT E] XTERNAL 
[SHFT D] RIVE":PRINT" {SHFT R] 
ENUMBER."; 'DGRO 
PRINT" [SHFT UjSE #'S 8-13 
ONLY"'BAJC 



T] 



1100 
1110 
1120 



1130 




Renumbet' an external dtive 
attached to the SX-64 and still have 
the internal drive remain drive #8. 
Or renumber both drives to any 
combination you choose. 

1 190: Second half of the flash prompt. 

1200; Erases the prompt 

1210: Inputs the internal drive number you are going to use, 

1220: (Checks to make sure ><)u u.se numbers bct^^'een 8- 1 3- 

12.^0: Initiiilizc-s die drive ( tot;ilh' li;iniile,ss ). 

1240: Tem]"K)rarih- renumbers tlie interrud dri\e to #14. 

1250: First half of die second fl:ish prompt. 

1 300: Input-s die external dri^'e number you are going to 

use, 
1310: Checks to make sure you have used numbers 8-13- 
1 320: Checks to make sure lx>tli drives do not use tlie sune 

number 
1330: Renumbers the external drive to the number you 

haw chosen, 
1350: Rcnumliers tlie internal dri\e ln)m i-i to tlic number 

you ha\'e chosen. 
1360: lniti;ilizes die drive ;ifteryou have renumbered it. 
1 370: .Advises you diat the prognun is completed. Q 

1140 POKE 198,0'BFXY 

1150 PRINT" [RVS] "TF$EX$'BGQB 

1160 FOR 1=1 TO 150:NEXT 

:REM TIME DELAY 'FQKH 
1170 PRINT" [DOWN, SPACE6, SHFT P] RESS 

[RVS,SHFT R,SHFT E,SHFT T,SHFT U, 

SHFT R,SHFT N , RVOFF] "' BANK 
1130 GET A$:IF A$=CHRS ( 13 ) THEN 

1200'FNYH 
1190 PRINT" [RVOFF] "TF$EX$ 

:FOR 1=1 TO 150:NEXT 

:G0TO 1150'GSSL 
1200 PRINT" IH0ME,D0WN5] "SPS'BDYV 
1210 INPUT" [HOME, D0WN7, SHFT E]NTER 

[RVS, RED, SHFT I ] NTERNAL [ RVOFF, 

WHITE] [SHFT D] RIVE # ";IN'BDYG 
1220 IF IN>13 OR IN<8 THEN 1210'FLLC 
1230 OPEN 1,8,15,"I"'BHJA 
124 PRINT* 1,"M-W"CHR$( 119) CHR$(0) 

CHRS (2) CHR$ (14-1-32) CHR$ (14-1-64) 

Cotiliiiiteelonfifi. 102 



60 MARCH '87 



CABLES&ACCESSORIES HARDWARE & SOFTWARE 





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6 Ft. RS232, 25 Pin, Male/Female $14.95 

9 Ft, 6 Pindin, Male Rt. Angle/Male $9.95 

12 Ft. Joystick Extension $8.95 

6 Ft. 90" Angle 1541 Powercord $9.95 

7 Ft. Modem Extension Cord (Plug-Plug) $3.95 

15 Ft. Modem Extension Cord (Plug-Plug) $5.95 

25 Ft. Modem Extension Cord (Plug-Plug) $6.95 

Handy Fuse Puller $1 .95 

IC Puller (No more poked fingers) $4.95 

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AMIGA UPDATE 



nvTiM loxr.s 



AmigaBASIC Tutorial 



Part 2: Menus 



' Tliis file assumes ihot you undeistand how screens and windows 
' are called from AmigaBASIC. If you don't understand those 
' points, please review part 1 eniled Screens before 
' proceeding. 



DefineScreenWindow: 
Titles = "MENU Tutorial 



TIM JONES" 



WINDOW 2,Ti11e$„7,-l 

WINDOW OUTPLfT 2 ' TTiese calls were covered In part 1 if 

' you need tielp. We ore using ttie 

' default Wo[ki3ench screen (saves 

' memoFYO- 

InitMenus: ' We define our menus here 

' Mem Sotements toke on ttie following format: 

' MENU Menu*, ltem#, ActiveLevel#, "String" 

' Where Menu# is the number of the menu (Returned in MENU(0) 

' when it is called). ltem# is the menu item that was selected 

' (Ifetumed in I^ENU(t) when ttie menu button is released). 

' ActJveLevel# (0-2) detemnines it ttie menu or particular item 

' is selectable, if t Is 1 , it is selectable, 2 indicates 

' ttiat it is selectable and has a checkmark to the left of the 

' string. If it is a 0, the string is ghosted ond is not 

' selectable. If the menu designator is 0, the ente menu is 

■ not selectable. Also, only ActiveLevel's of of 1 ofe 
' allowed as the menu designator AdiveLevel. 

' Activelfivel is referred to os AL in the future. 
MENU 1,0,1, "First Menu" ' The first menu is active 

IVIENU 1,1,1," First Item" 

MENU 1,2,1," Second Item" 

MENU 1,3,1," Third Item" 

MENU 1,4,0," Can't Select if!" 
MENU 2,0,0, "Second Menu" ' The second menu Is inactive and 
■ ghosted. 

MENU 2,1,1," Firs! Item" ' Even if the item is other than 

' AL 1, Itie MAIN AL of the menu is 
■0 

MENU 2,2,2," Second Item" ' Even the checkmark is ghosted! 

MENU 2,3,0," Third Item" 
MENU 3,0,1, "Quit Menu" ' This menu gives you the vmy out 

MENU 3,1,1," Exit to BASIC" 
MENU 4,0,0."" 

■ Note: If you don't Include the menu 4 statement, the BASIC 
' 'Windows' menu stays octive. 

InfoText: 
CLS: COLOI? 3,0 

LOCATE 8, 1 : PRINT " iPress and hold the right mouse btrtton." 
PRINT "This will activate the menu strip at the top of the" 
PRINT "screen. Move the pointer onto the strip to select on" 
PRINT "item (just like Wor1<t)ench). You will notice (hat menu" 
PRINT "2 is totally ghosted. This means thot if is nof 



A short pmgmm deimmstrcites difficult areas of 
AmigaBASIC, offeting botfj tips on confusing areas 
and tiicks to make your life easier: Rath&- than an 
article followed by a program, ii>e have combined 
them for the sake of clarity. 

PRINT "selectable. If you try to select a menu 2 item, nothing" 
PRINT "Nwill happen. Also, as you select items from menu 1 ," 
PRINT 'the appropriate Menuttem will hove a checkmart^ ploced" 
PRINT "immediately !o ite left side" 

Mainline: 

ON MENU GOSUB MenuSelection : MENU ON 

SLEEP 
GOTO MainLlne 

' All tnot is accomplished by the above routine is to activate the 
' menus with the MENU ON command and then wolf for the user to 
' press, the menu button on the mouse (the right button). The SLEEP 
' function just tells the program to do nothing unless it is caught 
' by the user pressing the menu button on the mouse. This mokes 
' your program more compatible in a multi-tasking situation by 
' allowing the Amiga to take core of other tasks until the 
' awakening function occurs (In this case, the menu button is 
' pressed). 

MenuSelection: 

MenuSel7o = MENU(O) ' Which menu did the user select (1-4)? 

Menutfem7o = MENU (1) ' Which item in that menu? 

ON MenuSel7o GOSUB Menul„QuitMenu ' Note that the 2nd possibilify 

■ doesn't GOSUB anywhere. 
' This is because menu #2 is 
' non-selectable (see 
' InitMenus) if#2 wos used, 
' you would put on entry 
' there, 

RETURN 

Msnul; 

' Tills routine resets menu #1 and puts a checkmark to the let! of 
' the Menuttem that you selected. You MUST do it this woy eoch 
' time or AmigaBASIC won't remove the checkmark from any 
' previously checked Item. 

MENU OFF 

' Prevents the user from intenupting the update. This turns ttie 
' menu button on the mouse off. Othenwiss, it is possible tor 
' the user to interrupt ttie menu neconsfrndion. 

LOCATE 6,1 

COLOR 3,0 : 

PRINT " You selected MENU 1 , Hem #";Menultem% : COLOR 1 ,0 

PRINT GHR$(7); ' BEEP Sticks sometimes. CHR$(07) is ttie ASCII BELL 

IF Menultem% = 1 THEN 

MENU 1.01, "First Menu" 

MENU 1,1,2," First Item" 

MENU 1,2,1," Second Item" 

MENU 1,3,1," Third Ifem" 

MENU 1,4,0," Can't Select r 
END IF 

IF Menultem% = 2 THEN 
MENU l,01,"Flrst Menu" 

MENU 1,1,1," First Item" 

MENU 1,2,2," Second Item" 



Continued on p^. 64 



62 MARCH '87 




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Contituwil frt»>i !>)•. 62 

MENU 1,3,1," Third Item" 

MENU 1,4,0," Con't Select r 
END IF 

IF Menultem% = 3 THEN 
MENU l,0,),"First Menu- 

MENU 1,1,1," First Item" 

MENU 1,2,1," Second Item" 

MENU 1,3,2," Ttiird Item" 

MENU 1,4,0," Cam Select r 
END IF 

MENU ON ' We're thfough, so reoclivate the menu button. 
RETURN 

QuitMenu: 

LOCATE 6, 1 : PRINT CHRS(7), ' BEEP sticte somelimral 

PRINT " You have chosen to return to BASIC" 

FOR Delay = 1 to 4500 ; NEXT Delay 

WNDOW aOSE 2 : SCREEN aOSE 1 : MENU RESET 

STOP 

' Ttiis file is being presented os an aid to prospective 

' AmigoBASlC programmers, 1 om interested in spreoding the use 

' of icnguoge becouse of its extreme versatility. 

' tf you have any comments or corrections, 1 con be contocted 

' ttirough People Link as AmSoft 1 . 

' If you like to coll Amiga Pas's, 1 can also be reached at: 

■WinderlandBBS(617)-665-3796 

' ZeitGefSt BBS (5 1 6)-679-3 1 05 g 



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Electronic 
Money 

The Art of Banking at Home 

Let's fece it How many times have you sacrificed lunch hours and endured slow- 
moving lines to transfer money from your savings account to your checking 
account? That's history. Just as man swapped his saddle atop a horse for the 
bucketseat of a q>orts car, one day you may trade your checkbook for a keyboard, 

D 



by Gary V. Fields 



rivc-in windows were the first attempt to 
make banking eiisier and faster. Automatie b;uik 
machines and money access cards were the next. 
But no matter how you do it, you still have to leave 
your home. Tliis is wh>' home bmiking is tlie logi- 
cal next step. If >'ou tliink I'm tiUking about die 
future, you're v\Tong — home banking is here at 
affordable prices. Tlie time to disciird diose paper 
checks may be at hiuid. 

Several banks now offer their customers the op- 
tion of banking \'ia a home computer wired direct- 
ly to the bank's computer Once die bank's data 
base Ls accessed, you c;ui do everytliing short of 
physically touching your money. You can mo\'e 
mone>' from one account to anodier, check ac- 
count balances, check interest rates, or pay bills. 
For some ctistomers, tliis convenience wiU save 
not only time, but money as well. 

Alx>ut tliree years ago at a news conference held 
at tlie Universit}' of Nortli Carolinii, IcK'al bank offi- 
cials released plans to offer home biuiking to their 
customers. Little notice was made of the an- 
noimcement. because ;ifter all, not as many homes 
contained personiil computers back tlien, and if 
they did, it was assumed diat they were more often 
used to keep track oiPacMan than paychecks. But 
times have changed, and the "toy" computer has 
been replaced widi die "tcxjl" computer. 

Of course, the simple existence of a senice 
doesn't necessaril)' justifv' your using it. Before you 

66 MARCH '87 



make the plunge, here are some important ques- 
tions to answer, 

"Who Needs Home Banking? 

Imagine diis: It Ls Frida>' ;iftemoon. You need to 
be in Chicago early Moiid;i>' morning for business. 
As the banks close for tlie weekend, die transmis- 
sion of your car begins to chew metal. Tlie me- 
chanic says he'll work late to ffx yotir car, but he 
won't extend you credit. 

How will \'ou pa)' die repair bill? You drained 
your checking account for traveler's checks for the 
business trip, and with die banks closed, you can't 
get into your savings. If" you wTite tlie mechanic a 
check, it will bounce, but if you pay him in travel- 
er's checks, you won't be able to afford your trip. 
How can you transfer Hinds firom your savings ac- 
count into your checking to cover die o\'erdraw 
;md still be in Cliicago on time? 

Well, die simplest solution is to bre;ik into die 
bank and move enougli money from your savings 
account into your checking account to cover the 
transmission bill. Home biinking is die legal w^y to 
do just that. 

People who ciui easily justify die expense of 
home banking are busine^ people who can't af- 
ford to wait for the banks to open to do business. 
Others who can benefit :ire handicapped or elderly 
people. And people who don't live neiir a bank may 
find the time and expense to travel to the bank 
may exceed the cost of home banking. 





-'3W1:"- S- 




Anoilier group who c;in benefit ftx)m 
ihLs scn'ice are tliose who WTitc a lot of 
checks. TTiis is because tlie bank \\ill pay 
your bills tor you. 'Iliis means tliat you 
sa\c both the time you would spend 
writing ;ind mailing paper checks, plus 
tlie p(jstagc. And even if you don't qiuilify 
for free checking, \ou"lI still save about 
40"' on each check you send electn)ni- 
L-.dl\- liecause most b;uiks charge less to 
pnxjess :m eleciriMiic debit. 

In short, convenience is the priniar)' 
rKLwn for using home banking When 
you bank at home, \()u are free to bank 
whc-n it Ls con\enient for you, regiirdless 
of whether tlial is tiiree o"ckx:k in Ute 
aftemcKMi or tiiR-e o'clcKk in ttie morn- 
ing. 'Ilie same is tnie of holidays — liome 
banks never close. Hut tlie reason I like 
home banking is that I love a bargain and 
I liate writing checks to pay hills. 

Signing Up 

When I walked into the Asheville 
bnuich of tlie Nortli (iirolina Nation;il 
Biuik (NCNB) to get details aliout home 
hiuiking, 1 figureil I'd be able to sign up 
;uid Ix- out in under a half hour. However, 
I w:»s v\Tong 

lastead of being able to sign up at the 
l(x.al office, all I couki get there was :ut 
application fomi which had to be sent lo 
NC:NB's main tjfiice in C^hiirlotte. 1 w:ls a 
little disappointed aliout tliLs dela\-. but it 
gave me a cliance to give die home b;uik- 
ing demonstration temiin;d in tlie Ixuik's 
lobby a tr\-. As I left ilie himk. I dropjx'd 
my application in a m;ullx)x and went 
home to wait. 

llic wait lasted only six days. On tlie 
scvendi da\- 1 had tlie infVmnation I need- 
ed. I sit down wiUi tlie package luitl dou- 
ble-checked what I needed: a computer, 
telecommunications .softw;ire, private 
telephone line. miKlem and a subscrip- 
tion to CompuServe. Home banking 
could Ix; expensive, 1 tln)ught. I had con- 
sidered subscribing to (CompuServe l^e- 
fore, but the initial log-on fee always 
slop|X'd me short. 1 w;ls l')eginning to 
lia\e second tliouglits. 

1 telephoned tlie bank to check alioiit 
the cost of the subscription to Compu- 
Scne, hoping tliat the>- would tell me 
home b;inkers got some s7K-ci;il grou[i 
rate. I was riglit, tlie\' tlo — it's free. Well, 1 
couldn't compkiin alx)ut that price. /\nd 
when I learned tliat die bank would ;ilso 
pay my first SI 5 in on-line access 
charges, I was delighted. This home 
biinking deal w;ls beginning to sound 
ver\' appealing. 




Then I was told that the lijink's fixed 
monthh' fee for tlie first diree months 
was vvaivetl. 'Ill is sounded almost too 
g(X)d to Ix- true. First tlie bjuik gl\es me a 
subscription to CompuServe ;uid SI 5 to 
spend on CompuServe, dien kicks in free 
banking for tliree montlis. Where's tlie 
catch, 1 iLskeil myself. 

Tlie catch Ls tlie service. The bank was 
so sure 1 would lo\e home biuiking tliat 
thej' were willing to risk tlieir own mon- 
CT to show it off. I had nt)thiiig to lose 
since tlie lri;tl run was free. 1*1 us, regard- 
less of what I decided, I got CiompuServe 
free. How could 1 refuse? 

Bec-aase 1 w;ls a new user of Compu- 
Scr\'c, I had to sign on to it Ix'fbre I could 
access my new NCNB electronic b;uik- 
ing account. That was pretty simple. 
Alter finding tlie Ux^al accc-ss nunilxr for 
my location, I Ixxited up my terminal 
program, dialed the service and an- 
swered a few prompts for tilings; like II> 
number, piissword, terminal t)pe. :uid 
baud rate. All tlie iiifbmiation 1 needed 
was in tlie package tile b;uik sent. 

I had Ix'cn told diat I could go direcdy 
to the NC;NH section of ( AimpuServe by 
t)ping (i() N<;b at any prompt. But once 
on, I wiLS in no hurry to rush to the bank. 
When I finally got iirounti to lyjiing Ct) 
NCB, tlie hiuik's door .swung open to 
welcome me in a matter of seconds. But 
before 1 coukl do business 1 liatl to iden- 
tify myself to the bank's security gii;ird. 
First 1 tyix'd my b;tnk ID numlxT. Ilie 
guard recognized die numlx-r ;uid ;Lsked 
for die p;Lss-v\'ord. Misunderstanding, f 
entered my CxmipuScrve pavsword by 
mistlike. laste;id of slamming tlie door in 
my face when I offered the wn)iig pass- 
word, tlie giuird ;dlowed me to tn' again. 
On die second try 1 entered the correct 
word and I was in. 

The next prompt led me U) what I 
diink is die nicest fcatuR" of home blink- 
ing — tree bill |ia\ing. You ;ire prompted 
to enter tlie n;tnic-s and addres.ses of cli- 
ents, companies, individuids. shops and 
utilities dijit \'ou send checks to regularly. 
1 cntcrcd die n:uiie and adtlress of tlie 
water department, telephone, electric 
and mortgage companies, GMAC and 
Sears. Tlien I c:m instnict die Ixuik to 



take ftinds out of my checking account 
and pay my bills when ilie\' come due. 

'Ihe only ret[uirement is tliat I sigiiid 
die tnuisfer of Ixinds five d;tys before die 
bill is due. This allows die bank time to 
either electronically transfer funds to 
co\er my bilLs, or if the compmiy or per- 
son doesn't lia\e ;ui account widi NCCNB, 
die Ixuik must cut a regular paper check 
and send it by mail. 1 love die idea of 
someone else writing checks, atldressing 
envelopes ;ind licking stamps to pay my 
bills iastcad of me! 

Can you imagine a 
bank paying routine 
bills for you postage -free 
simply because you 
bank at home instead of 
showing up in their 
lobby? 

Once you have entered ;dl die niunes 
:uid addresses, you ;ire presented home 
biuiking's m;iin menu. (Ilie whole ser- 
vice is menu-driven ;ui(.l simple to use, 
even if you've never iLsed a computer be- 
fore. ) 'I'his menu lists six senices: Check- 
ing Saving. Bill ftivnient. liintLs 'I'rarLSter, 
C;rL-dit <;ard, ;md (aistomer Service. Mov- 
ing between die .sen'ices is simple since 
all you need do is enter die numlx-r pre- 
ceding die service :uid jircss RE'I'LUjN. 

1 c;Uled up Checking first. Tliere I was 
idilc to see exacUy how much money I 
had on h;uid ;ind what my credit reserve 
was, as well as rev lew die account's activ- 
itv- (when the last deix)sit was made ;md 
in what amount, ;uid so on). I need only 
one checking account, but if you have 
more, die b:mk c:ui accommodate them 
just as well. 

Next I had a look at mv' savings ac- 
count. The scTcen rc-spondcd witli the 
account number, bidiuice tLita. b;d;mce, 
intea-st eiuned, diat day's activity, luid in- 
formation alxnit die most axent activity 
diea- (tlie check I had deposited diat 
morning liad already been credited). 

;\s I said bcfoa', tlie Bill Payment .Ser- 
vice Ls die :irc-a I ajiiireciate die most. 
Pa-ssing die number ^ at die m;un menu 
brings up die bill-paying .section. 'Ilica- 1 
was offered five new opdons: pay bills, 



68 MARCH '87 



review pending pa\TncntB, cancel pay- 
ments, review year-to-date payments, or 
call up the Payees Index. 

The Payees Index lets me add or 
cliange information about the people 1 
will have tJie biuik send checks to. Ilie 
other menu headings offer tlie intbnna- 
tion and options their names suggest. 
Sensibly, the bill-paying options have 
multiple ern>r-pR.^ention safe-gii:ircls, so 
there is no way to eidier accidentally 
send a dieck to the wrong address or 
send a check for tlic wrong amount. 

The Funds Transfer options can lie a 
real lifcsaver if you ever find yourself in a 
situation where you need mone\' for ;m 
emergenc)' or a b;irg;un. Here you are 
free to shift monc)' between any of your 
checking or savings accounts until you 
have your moncj' distributed where you 
need it 

If you sometimes push your credit 
c-ards to the limit, you'll appreciate tlie 
infomiation you can get from the Credit 
Card Index. Here you can review^ the sci- 
tus of your credit c;ird accounts xs well 
as double-check tlie credit line eiich ciir- 
ries. While 1 m;>ke it a rule to never pay 
interest on a credit c;ird, 1 do appreciate 
the convenience of using my cards, espe- 
cially when buying merchandise by 
phone. By reviewing the information 
here, I can be sure tlie purchase 1 want to 
make won't cause m)' total for the montli 
to exceed my credit line (A quick look 
can usuiiUy quickly convince me that I 
can't afford somediing ) 

Is Home Banking AflFordable? 

To acc-urately reflect die cost of honie 
banking I divide the cost into two cate- 
gories: dolliirs and time. 

I was surprised by the service's cost. 
When tlie prcxliicLs manager at NCNB 
told me I would be charged S12 per 
month for home banking plus I would 
have to pay $4.25 per hour to Compu- 
Serve wliile in die biuiking section, in ad- 
dition to tlie charge for enich check I 
wrote, 1 w:ls ready to say, "Thanks, but no 
thanks." And by die same token, consider 
buying a modem and tcmiinal program if 
you don't already' luive them. 

However, once 1 got o\er the fimuicial 
blast, diings beg;ui to look more promis- 
ing. Those charges are the maximum 
chaises possible. Just as minimum bal- 
ances kept in a regular sav'ings account 
can reduce tlie cost of checking diiJerent 
balances can also reduce die charges of 
home banking. By keeping a minimum of 
S500 in my regular savings account, my 



account with NCNB costs only S 1 2 per 
month (after the diree-month trial ). 

Tile best way I found of reducing the 
cost of home banking Ls to let tfie b;uik 
pay my bills. Can you imxigine diat — a 
b;ink paying routine bills for you (post- 
age free) simply because you bank at 
home instead of showing up in dicfr lob- 
by? (Friends have tried to suggest die 
biink w;is wiUing to go to this extreme 
simply to keep me out of dieir lobby, but 
r\e tricxl to suppress diat diouglit. ) What 
1 found amazing about this service is diat 
It is actually cheaper than paying by 
checks. This is possible bec-ause a debit 
(or check) ;issigned to your home blink- 
ing account costs less than a paper 
check. Plus, the bank dtK's ;dl die papier- 
work and even pays tlie postage. 

If you consider your time valuable, 
you may be able to justilS' die cost of 
home banking simph- by die ;unount of 
time it saves you. If your time is too valu- 
able to v\^jste standing in your bank wait- 
ing for your turn, home banking is a ser- 
vice wordi considering. R)r instance, If 
you earn SI2 per hour :uicl spentl two 
hours a mondi driving to ;uid from tlie 
bank, you arc already wasting S24 wonli 
of time each month doing your banking. 
And don't forget to add all die hidden 
costs like gas, parking :uid postage. 

I figure the savings 1 will incur fix>m 
gas tor ni)' car and parking cliitrges, com- 
bined widi what I'll save on postage and 
envelopes (not to mention time) by hav- 
ing tiie b;ink pay most of my bills, will 
cover the monthly fees. Because the 
newspaper where I work dei-x)siLs my 
check direcdy, diere is no rexscMi tor me 
to ever go downtown to bank unless I 
want to. The onl\' cost I c;tn't quickl\- bal- 
ance is the on-line cliargc-s of Compu- 
Serve, which add anodier S-i to SS to die 
monthly total. Sti while I couldn't c:dl die 
service free, I do consider its cost as dol- 
lars well spent. 

TIk' costs quoted fiere tivre those hi ef- 
fect at tfK' uniting of this ciiiicle and aiv 
only applicable to the senices offeivd 
b)' NCNB. The charges and senices of- 
feivd b}- other banks may differ. 




Home Banking First AicP 

1. Wlien you first access your liank via 
a network, set your baud rate at 30<), 
even if you have a modem cap;ihle of 
1200 baud. 1 suggest diis because when 
you first log on, you'll spend more time 
learning your way around [he system 
thiui acnuilly accessing .services, If v'ou 
did this exploring at 1200 baud, you 
would spend the SI 5 on-line credit 
twice iLs fa.st as at 300. Initially, your 
knowledge of die .service, not the sys- 
tem's speed, will determine how tltst you 
get on-;uKi oft'-line. htter when you know 
die system better, .switch to 1200 baud 
and siive money. 

2. Shop around. Diflcrent b:uil^s offer 
different sen ices and different rates re- 
gardless of whedier die banking is lx.'tng 
done electronic;ilh' or across a countei 
Jast as you miglit select one b;uik tjvei 
anodicr because of the minimum dcposii 
required for free checking or die av:ul 
aliility of free traveler's chectcs. die same 
is mie of on-line b:uiklng. C^heck each 
bamk's nites and scrvice-s before opening 
an account. 

3. Just as some baiiks offer free to;Lsters 
for opening a new sav ings account, soniq, 
banks offer free items or services fo; 
opening a home banking account. R>r in 
stance, c;itib;uik of .New \ork promoiec 
their version of home banking bv' offer 
ing Conmicxlore asers free modems, 

4. ff you iiave doubts ;ibout whetha 
you vvoidd really benefit from honi' 
biinklng, ;usk die iiiuik lor a deiiion.stni 
tion. Some biuiks (N(;NB included) hmi 
computers .set up in dicfr lobby so cui 
tomcrs can test dieir system. 

5. If )ou ;ire ;dre;idy a CompuServ 
user, you'll find five b;uiks there wher 
you can explore home b;uiking via or 
line demonslratioas. 'llicy are die Hun-~ 
tington NaUt)n;U Bank (GO I CVB ). NorUi 
Citrolina Naiion;d Bank (GO NCB), Siiav ' 
niut Biuik (GO SIIW), Southeast Bat 
(GO SEB) and I'nited American Ba 
(GOUAB). 

6. If you still fuive doubts, check wi 
the bank's pnKJuct manager alxiut p: 
modon:il pack;tgc-s. To attract new cu: 
tomers, some banks will actuiiily let yoi 
try home b;uiking ftee tor .sevend months 
so you aui try die new service without 
risk. But let me wiim you about diesc 
"triid ridc-s" — test driv ing home b;inking 
is a lot like trving out a new c;tr — cjne 
you'v'C experienced die ride, you'll find i: 
difficult to resist the luge to buy. 



)ne 

A 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 69 




Big 

Name 
Hunting 

in ® 

America 




Exploring the Licensing Jungle 





bv John fermaine 



licensing is ttie newest game in Commodore software. Who can be the 
first to purchase the hottest titles for projects that now exist only on the 
diawingboards? G.I. Joe"', Mickey Mouse"' and Godzilla" 
have aU been immortalized in Commodore pro- 
grams. How does licensing work? Wliat major 
deals have £illen dirough at die last 
moment? These are just some 
of the questions dis- 
cussed here in part 
one of a two-part 
look at the 





GX Joe and Barbie" 
Meet Godzilla 

Bob Botch, Vice President of Market- 
ing at Epyx, explains how Ep^rx has be- 
come one of the top licensing kings. 

Jermalne: What exactly is licensing? 
Botch; A license is merely a written 
agreement between two parties which 
allows a company like Epyx to legally use 
a femous chmraaer or theme in a soft- 
ware project. Licenses are put togetlier 
in much the same way that a union nego- 
tiates a contract People fipom both sides 
meet and discuss the issues, and wtien a 
bargain is reached, a contract is drawn. 

There are several diflFerent fomis of li- 
censing. The most common type of li- 
cense is known as a character license. 
Epyx wanted the name and likeness of 
Godzilla for The Movie Monster Gattie, 
so we purchased only tliose rights. Some 
companies acquire the tide of a popular 
book or movie and then may go a step 
further; They obtain the right to pattern 
their program after the plot of that Ixxjk 
or movie. 

Rjr example, Spinn;iker went so lar as 
to have Michael Crichton write tlie plot 
of the Amazon grapliic adventure game 
for their Tclarium scries based upon his 
book by the same title. Datasoft devel- 
oped programs based upon the 
^r^JSjT^ movies The Ncvcrending Story 

and The Goonies. And many 
software houses have li- 
censed and developed 
arcade giimcs by 
,\ 

/' 



'.j-'i(' 




purchasing the rights to toy tides like 
Epyx did with Barbie, G.I. Joe and Hot 
Wheels™. 

These are the common forms of li- 
censing that most of us are aware of But 
there are others. Epj-x has a special li- 
cense agreement with Lucasfilm Games 
which allows us to purchase certain pro- 
grams written by the group to market 
and advertise under the Epyx label. 

As you probalily know, Epj-x Mjftware 
is sold around tlie world. We could man- 
u&cuirc enougli material to meet world- 
wide demands and send it abroad, but 
the dudes and import tariffe would cut 
down the profit marj^ sigiificantly. To 
counter this, Epyx has developed a li- 
censing program which literally sets up 
companies in foreign lands to become 
the Ep}^^ of their countn'. They have the 
right to manufacture, advertise and mar- 
ket our products under our guidelines. 
Jemiaine: Has one of Epyx's foreign dis- 
tributors ever needed to alter the soft- 
ware to fit that culture? 
Botch: Our representative in Japan 
has the right to make minor 
changes in Epyx software be- 
cause the Japanese market is 
so different from ours. 
Most of the time they 
make simple requests, , 

like wanting to replace 
a color on the package 
or title screen and 
substitute a bright 
yellow or red in it^ 



place. A couple of times, they've wanted 
to give a character in one of our games a 
Japanese appearance. W^hatever the 
cluinges are, they must present their case 
to us and justify the change. We still have 
final say on the matter. 
Jermaine: In general, what arc the terms 
of a license? 

Botch: The issues covered in license 
contracts can vary quite a bit, but two 
standard elements are found in mc»t of 
them. First of all, each contract contains a 
clause which defines a percentage of 
each sale that goes directly to the licen- 
sor. This figure can be almost ;iny amount 
of monej', depending ufxjn the strength 
of the title. Secondly, the agreement 
states tlie length of time that the license 
exists. We usually ask for two years. A 
supportive statement establishes a com- 
mitment where v^SS"* 
a minimum ^-^' 







S 



/ 




D' 




of product sales must be made in the first 
year, for the license to continue into tlie 
second one. 

Jermaine: Vthat arc tlie people like vvlio 
negotiate licease agrc-ements. and what 
do tile}- expect of you? 
Botch: Tlie groups liaiidllng the licease 
contracts arc as diflferent ;is ni^t and d;iy. 
In some cases, tiiey Ciui Ix; ven- rigid 
when it gets dowTt to what we can ;uid 
cannot do witli tlieir cliaracters or tides. 
G.I. Joe was an interesting project be- 
cause of the "strings" attached to tlie title. 
As most of you know, tanks are blown up 
and planes expkxle in die G.I. Joe c;ir- 
toon series, but no one is ever seriously 
injured or killed, 'flic cliiUlengc our de- 
signers faced was to create software diat 
was action-packed yet reniiun true to tlie 
G.I. Joe m\Th. Bclicw nic, tliat was a 
tougli order to fill. 



Ill l[M 


[jili 




1 

y 



Many popular ddcs, like G.I. Joe and 
Barbie, also have distinctive logos. In 
cases Ukc these, we're expected to dupli- 
cate the logo design and use it within our 
program. In st>me instiuices, certain col- 
ors must also be incorporated into a 
character or logo. Most of these agents 
prowde artwork for our inspecdon, leav- 
ing otlier matters to our imagination ;ind 
tlie terms of the agreement. 

You never really know wliat to expect 
when you're negotiating a contract. 
Sometimes a firm will simply ask us to 
spell the niimc of their property' correct- 
ly and send tliem the niyiilt}' checks. 
Jermaine: Vtliat Ls tlie bxsic sequence of 
events that leads to tlie signing of a li- 
cense agreement? 

Botch: All of our liceasing projects ha\e 
a common origin. Indi\iduiils from Epj-x 
are constantly kxjking around for new 
and interesting game topics, Once we 
have an idea in mind, our next step in- 
volves tracking down the owner(s) of tlie 



"Many popular titles 
like G.I. Joe and Barbie 
have distinctive logos we 
are expected to duplicate 
and use within the 
program " 

tide in question. Sometimes Epyx de:ils 
directh" witli :ui agent who negotiates 
contracts for many different license 
properties, At otlier times, we've hatl to 
contact the parent compiuiy of a title just 
to find out who takes care of negotiating 
their license ;igrccments. 

Whenever we finally approach the 
proper people ;uid disciLss putting one of 
tiicirchjinicters or craitioas in a comput- 
er game, %\e usuiilly catch tliem tot;dh' by 
surprise. If our people liavc done enough 
research on tlie matter at tliLs stage, iip^-x 
will probably make a proposal. Ihis stiite- 
mcnt ouUines what we'd like to do with 
the character :uid wliat we're willing to 
pay for the privilege. 

Once in a while, agents apprcMch the 
software companies v^'ith tlie licease to a 
hot char:icter or movie title. When tliis 
happens, tlity usually submit a pnxJuct 
concept or quote us a solid price for the 
license itself 

In any case, contract negotiatioas c;ui 
be Icngtii)' :ind complex, or as simple lls 
siiying yes we cm do somediing under 
tliese conditions or no we can't agree to 
them. 

Jermaine; Have there been any license 
j^reements tliat Epyx had to pxss on? 
Botch: Two items come to niintl riglit 
away. We w;mted to purchase tlie rigliLS 
to the book/mo\ic tide Dune for a new 
software pa)ject We negotiated \%idi an 
agent for a couple of weeks, :uid discov- 
ered dwt we didn't need to t;Ok witli him 
any longer — ^Atari had purchased tlie li- 
cense for Dune diree montlis before we 
had e\ en spoken to our contact. 

And for a long time Epj-x was ven- in- 
terested in Tlie TransTormers"', but we 
backed out of buying tlie licease at tlie 
last minute. K ven tliougli all of tlie major 
issues had been settled, we asked for 
some extra time to look diings ()\cr. Our 
additionjil resc-arcli uncovered the fact 
The TraasformcTS appeals to ;ui audience 
1 2 years-old and younger, v\ hile we gear 
most of our software to tlie 1 2 year-old 



and older crowd. I'm sure that a tide of 
this aimre would do well in the form of a 
video cartridge game, but it just didn't fit 
our image. 

Jermaine: What can you tell me about 
the liceasing of Gtxizilla for The Movie 
Monster Ckime'^ 

Botch: In the beginning. The Maine 
Monster Game was slatcxi to feature a se- 
lection of totally origiruil c~reature.s. As 
tlie pnignim e\olved, liowevcr, we found 
ourselves developing a cb:iractcr which 
closely resembled GtxlzilkL Our people 
had reached a point where the)' liitd to 
make some quick decLsions, Would it be 
to our advantage to license Godzilla tor 
the game, :ind if we went diis far, could 
we pick up the riglits to other fiunous 
movie monsters for tlie program? 

Rese;ux:h on die subject revealed tliat 
GodziUa Ls one of tlie most popukir mo\- 
ic monsters in existence. A new GtxMlla 
movie was released in 1985, Dr. Pep- 
per'" has produced two commerciiils 
featuring the giant liziird, and toy makers 
continue to manufticture iicpresentations 
of tlie creiiture. Tliese were all good sigas 
thiit tile public was interested in him. 

Negotiations for dus license went very 
well because we were- far cnougji along 
witli tlie program to show the Gotlzilla 
liceasing agent exactl)' what we wanted 
to do witli dieir ch;iracter. Our people 
e\en liad a sample of tlie packaging art 
for his inspcctioa Anodier fiictor in our 
fiivor was die feet that the agent repre- 




senting Soho Co. Ltd, had been market- 
ing the tide for some time. We came to 
an early agreement witliout encounter- 
ing a major stumbling block. 



72 MARCH '87 



Jemnaine: We've discussed the positive 
aspects of putting Godzilla into one of 
your games. Did you have any negative 
aspects? 

Botch: Yes, we did. Epyx was very sensi- 
tive to the fact tliat QxiziUa has tradition- 
ally been a bad monster. Me tiestroys pri- 
vate propert)' and txxasion;Uly eats or 
kills human beings. \X'c were so con- 
cerned with public's re;icti()n to our pro- 
ject tliat we tested Tlx Movie Monster 
Game concept on a group of parents. 
Some of them ga^e us a negative re- 
sponse, but the majorit)- of tlie adults ac- 
cepted the material as a liglit-licarted 
sptx)f Tliere Ls no point in the jirogram 
where [xiopic are L"aten or come to an 
equally terrible end. Epra has always 
projected a positive software image that 
allows any member of tlic family to use 
our prcxlucts. 

Jerrnaine: Did you consider licensing 
big name wrestlers for Chcmipiomhip 
Wrestling? 




Botch: Yes. \\c did. However, in this 
CLse, tlie negative factors oim\eiglied tlic 
positive. If we licerLScd a character like 
Hulk Hogan, for example, we would be 
restricted in how he could look on the 
screen and w^iat he was capable of doing 
Two licensed names would increase our 
woes because both indi\idiuils would 
want top billing, and sooner or later we'd 
have to determine which character was 
stronger. So to keep things simple for our 
^inie designers and marketing people, 
Epyx decided to create totally nc"\\' wres- 
tlers for the program. After ;ili, we could 
incorporate any traits we liked fixim the 
real wTcstlers into an original ch;iracter. 
Our progranuners also liiid more room 
to Ix: creative and not worry about the 
stipulations of a cx)ntracL 

B.C., Jen and Disney 

Sierra On-line, based in Coarsegold, 
California, has aiso had some interesting 
licensing experiences. John Willi;ims, a 
member of their licensing stafl", agreed to 
discuss this aspect of their business. 



"Disney, the masters of 
modem film animation, 
had difficulty adjusting 
to the realities of a 
180 X 250 line screen " 



Jermaine: Can you give me an id^ of 
what it costs to license a property for a 
piece of software? 

^XHliams: To put the answer in perspec- 
tive, you need to know some of tlie co.sLs 
of developing and manufacturiing soft- 
ware. In this example, let's examine an 
average program created under ideal 
conditions. These expenditures reflect 
actual figures. 

This fictional software is called Ricleiis 
of the Stontt and retails for S25. Dealer 
profit alone amounts to 40% or SIO, 
^^■|^ich reduces our mone>' ftum S25 to 
S 1 5. Distributor profit is another 1 5% re- 
duction or S3.75, which leaves us SI 1.25 
to work witli. Co-op advertising, ads re- 
tailers run featuring our products (Toj^s 
R Us"' is a good example ), costs us S.75, 
brinpng tlie gross profit of a single piece 
of sofhvare to SIO. SO. Packing costs 
amount to S2.50 per package, bringing 
our new total to S8. 

Now, most of our projects have two 
programmers working on them. Each 
programmer is paid approximately 
S2,000 a month tor an average of five 
mondis per project. I^jgr.unmers also 
get an estimated 15% royaltj' fixjm the 
S8 gross profit after the materials have 
bc-en paid for. \'ou may may think that we 
o\erpa)' our programmers, but be realis- 
tic: Any programmer gocxl enough to 
work for Sierra On-line could easily go 
out ;md get a 540,000 a year job at one of 
the local utilitv' companies. 

Two quality assurance people are 
pulled into the project to debug title pro- 
gram. These people are paid approxi- 
matelv SI, 200 a month for about six 
weeks' work. Add to these costs legal 
fees, rmigiizine advertising, office over- 
head, computer repair and maintenance, 
:md you're talking about our profit being 
terrificallv reduced. 



Just to break even on development 
costs alone for this imaginary program, 
we would have to sell 3,418 units at S25 
a package. At Sierra On-line we won't 
touch a projca unless we can sell at least 
1 5,000 copies per machine, which is the 
break-even point on all costs. 

Now, if we're developing a program 
where' a license is involved, take another 
10% off the top (sometimes more") for 
royalties which go dire'ctly to tlic owner 
of the license. The licensing riglits to 
Frogger alone cost us o% er a quaner of a 
million dollars. We also paid approxi- 
matel)' one million dolkirs to license the 
DLsnej' n;une for a tliree-ycar period. 
Jermaine: Speaking of Disnej', how did 
you become involved with them? 
'Williams: Sierra On-line and Disnev' got 
together as a result of the fall of Texas 
Instniments and tlieir miaxK'omputcr, 
tlie Tl'99. Texas Instalments had iui 
agreement with Walt Disnc)' Productions 
to create educational software for the 
TI/99 over a two-yc"ar period. When it 
became obvious tliat the Texas Instru- 
ments system was dying in the market 
Texas Instniments helpctl Disncv' search 
for a well known softw;ue company that 
would "assume' their t)blig;ition and pro- 
duce Disney-quality material. Our com- 
pany fit that bill. The acftial contract was 
signed at the 1984 Winter CES Show in 
Las Vegjis. 

Jermaine: What have you learned fiom 
working with the Disney fieople? 
'mlliams: Dealing witli tlie Disnc)' per- 
sonal computer software- staff has been 
an cducadon for everv'one at Sierra On- 
line. The situation with Disney that 
makes our software projects so special is 
the fact that we're not mere'ly licensors of 
the Walt Disnc\' name, but we liave a co- 
development arrangement. Simply put, 
DLsney has input into programs contain- 
ing dieir characters fi^om conception to 
completion, with a fin:il ri|^it of iq)proval 
over evervtliing in tlie .software-. 

VChen Sierra began working widi the 
Disney designers, it was an experience 
for both. The Disney team had some 
things to learn about computers. They 
didn't know about tilings like color limi- 
tations on diflerent systems, how much 
animation can happen on a scre-en at a 
given moment and tliat basically, each 
microcomputer has its o^ti limitations. 
Understandably, the Disney designers 
Continued on pg 127 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 73 



j!«!r'««*!»!?.r-'i^!^, 



LIGHTS... CAMERA 

ACTION 



^ommo(h^ "Cpn^suietb itt^oU^ 




bv Matthew Leeds 



imiiiilBtelKf^i 



From a distance, HoUywood is all glitz and gm t er. Mar s come 

and go, million-dollar deals are negotiated, and movies are 

filmed. Behind the scenes, however, is a tremendous amount 

of hard work. Enter the Commodore 64 and Amiga computers. 



Synchronizing Soundtracks 

The creation of a film's soundtrack is an im- 
mense tiisk. Music is used to accompiui}' and ac- 
cent action, foreshadow events ;md add impact. 
Tlie score must parallel tlie action pcrtecth'. fol- 
lowing the pace and tempo, chiuiging speed to 
match tlie rh^tlim. The task of ctxjrdinating tlie 
peaks in tlic music with die dramatic points in tlie 
script used to Ix.- done by h;md, using programma- 
ble metronomes, Knudson click track Ixxiks, cal- 
culators — ^and a tremendous imiount of time. 

The S)'ncl"ironi2atk)n of sound in film is done to 
tlie frames and sprockets on the film. Tliirt\'-fi\'e 
millimeter mcnie film is nin at 24 fi^^imes per sec- 
ond. Tlie standiird measurement of a time-fi~.uiie is 
therefore 24 frames per second. Hach fixunc has 
eight sprocket holes. 

Now imaguie tliat you're a composer tning to 
key a piece of music to a scene. Tlie music has al- 
read\^ been created, set to a y. tempo. Ilie scene 
has alread)' been created, and die point in die ac- 
tk)n diat \'Ou lia\'e to match the music to cxrcurs 
327 frames into die scene, "ibu ha\ e to find a new 
teniix) diat will niatcli die musical higlipoint of the 
score to the dramatic "liit" in die scene. 

Now imagine that there :irc .se\'cnil "hits" diat 
have to lie matched, iuid the time lietween them 
docs not match die time llet^^een tlie liij^i points 
in die score. "Nbu need to ha\e \ariable tempos in 



the score. And, oh yes, die film editor has just 
reciit die film and your score is due in two days. 

This is what Rich;ird and Ron Grant of Auricle 
Control Systems were up against when the\- decitl- 
ed to create a software progiiuii on a (^onimcKlore 
64 to sinipliJS' diis paxcss. Wliile working on the 
program, diey realized diat just designing software 
to solve die problem wasn't enougli. Tliey had to 
find a way to make it simple to use. Tlie resuk Is 
7he I'ilm CoinJx)ser's Time ProcessoK 

The remarkable success of 7ibf Time Pirxessori^ 
due not only to die amount of time it can save a 
composer, but the ease with which it can be 
learned. It uses a menu less comm;uid stnicuire 
that can be customized. For exjuiiple, if >'ou wiuit 
to re-time a bar, just say so, Tlie program will un- 
derstand your command, and you ciui change die 
name of any comniiind to ;ui}tliing \'ou prefer. 

The Time Processor am be interfaced to syndie- 
sizers or drum machines to su|-)pl\' a "clock" diat 
drives them at perfect time. It has been used in 
Dynasty. Dallas. Karate Kid, the Ewak Special. 
Amazing Stories, Siherado, Kniglit Rider, St. Else- 
where, The Color Purple, Knots Landing and 
American Hyers. 

In 1985 Rich:ird ;uid Ron Grant won an I-mmy 
Award for ouLstiuiding achievement in engineering 
development. Tliey have now been nominated for 
an AcadeniA' award for Scientific and Technical 



Achievement But tliis is oiily one way 
the 64 is used for film pixxluction. 

Controlling Lights 

Unitm Connector CA)mp;in>' tot)k the 
BSR X-iO appliimtc controller, applied it 
to liglitmg control systems ;md added :ui 
interlace to allow the 6-i to control tlie 
ligliLs on-stagc. Tliis system uses niodukir 
remote<ontroUed ind!\idii;d dimnicTS to 
liiindie tlie higli-iy)s\er requirements of 
stiige ligliting. Each module is addressed 
by a dijptai R/F sigruil sent o\er tlie exist- 
ing clectriciil wiring. The 64 is connect- 
ed to an interlace c;dled tlie Digi-64. Us- 




The film Composers Time Processor. 

ing Union Connector's StagePro soft- 
ware, up to 48 dimmers can he con- 
tn>lled. witli 48 sc-p:irate scene ligliting 
setups preset iind i ligliting ch;use se- 
quences stored on disk, liach dimmer 
can he set to one of 1 6 le^^•ls of illumina- 
tion or turned on or off ii.sing tlie con- 
troller Dimmers tliat handle one. two, 
six or twelve kilowatts of power are 
available. 

Teleprompting 

'Hie 64 Ls used in other performance- 
related ways, as well. Tetescript h;is cre- 
ated a complete teleprompting .sA'stem 
controlled liy a 6t, A teleprompier (.ILs- 
plays text in a huge t))xrface and scrolls it 
at a controlled rate so tlie speaker c;ui 
read a prepared spc-ech to a giitliering 
witlUHit referring to iiandwricten notes. 
Man)' systems ilsc a liallsil\cred iiiirn)r 
;uid a video monitor, set up in such a way 
that the speaker can see lx)th tlie text on 
the monitor ;ind c.ui kx)k out tlirougli 
the mirror to sec tlie audience ;is well. 

I'sing the 64. the felcscript system 
can edit, store, feaUl and tli-Splay scripts, 
as well as paKliice hartl copy. Altliouj^i a 
complete sjstem e:ui run into tlie tlioii- 
sands of dolttrs, it's interesting to sec that 
the heart of tlic packigc Ls a 64. 

Slide Shows 

Not all productioas are big budget fea- 
aia- films, lio\\ever. Ihere arc a lot of 



multi-media prescntatioas by corpora- 
tions, retailers and industry in which 
hundreds of slides are used in a single 
presentation, ;ind keeping track of tliem 
can be a tremendous task. Slktc-Hiuler is 
;ui interacti\'e slide-filing system tliat not 
onl\' crc-ates a data base for tracking your 
slides, but controls a slide projector to 
find and display each slide lus j-ou c-:ill it 
up. Records c;ui Ix' .searched by any field 
and rqx)rts c;in Ix; printed. 

'Ilie core of die .system is the POI Pro- 
jector Control Interiace controlled by a 
64. The de\elopers of Slkk'-f-iiK/er. Inter- 
active Tcchnolog>\ are ;dso producing 



Although a complete 
system can run into 
thousand ofdolkirs, it 
is interesting to see that 
the heart of the package 
is a Commodore 64. 



softwarc-autlioring and pnxluction tools 
for tiie creation of multi-projector slide 
presentations. 

'llie 6i Ls Ix'ing put to use in many 
otiier applicatioiis in the entertainment 
field, such ;ls tiding of %-ideos, .script and 
budget preparation, stor\'boarding and 
video animation, just to n;ime a fov. Take 
a clo.se kx)k at tlic next television or fea- 
ture film, and you just may find a 64 liid- 
den in tlie wings. 

Amazing Amigas in 
Amazing Stories 

I'm stiuiding in the "gold shack" on the 
set of tlie weekly 'l\ scries Am;izing Sto- 
ries watching video monitors tlisplay a 
set of graplis and cliarts, part of the spe- 
cial eflFecLs Ix-ing u.sed in die epistxte be- 
ing filmed. ITie gold shack Ls .so named 
becau.se of die value of the vitleo luid 
computer ec|Liipment it contains. Ilie 
newest addition to the shack Ls a pair of 
Amiga computtTS, being u.scd to create a 
digital look to lui actors face while he 
acts. 

Art dinxtor Richard Ix-wis exiilmncxi 
to mc that llie Ani;izing Stories" director 
had been Itxiking for a cerciin effect to 
add retlism to tlic stor\'line. 'I "hey ex- 
pk)red altemati\-es for tiie effect using 
tniditional computer-b:Lsed special ef- 
fects equipment, but were umilile to cre- 
ate tile look tlic\' needed in real-time. 



Tlie real-time element was espcci;iUy 
important, '^bu k)se a lot if an actor lias 
to act to a videotiipe of anotlier actor's 
performance," Lewis explained. "We 
needed a way to keep tlie treshness and 
spontaneity between two people. Tlie 
Amiga gave us die look we wanted, kept 
the real-time element alisc. and came in 
at a budget diat was a fraction of die cost 
of any other sjstem." 

Tlie first thing IxAvis tiki was to c^ill in 
Aegis Development, a .st)ftwaie develop- 
er for ±e Amiga, to supph' computer 
hardware and to provide the technical 
expertise. Ae^' approach was to pUicc 




Airfield drawn with Aegis Images. 

the actor on a separate .set with a \idei) 
cimera supplying a live feed to tlic gold 
shack. Tlie video sigjial is fed into ;ui 
Amiga thn)ugli a video digitizer. The digi- 
tized signal is dien fed into a Fairligtit 
SEG to crc-atc additional special effects. 

'l"he video signal Ls then fed into a sec- 
ond Amiga through a genlock device. 
Tlie .second Amiga crc"ites text overlays 
on tlie digitized video signal. Tlic text it- 
self Ls cTC-ated bv ;ui AmigaBASIC pn)- 
gnim, and can be cliangcd by liitting dif- 
fcre-nt keys on the keyboard. The final 
video signal is sent out to die m;iin .set 
and rear-projected onto a verv' large 
screen where ;m actress c;ui react to it as 
if it were' a five actor (which in tact it is). 
Her actions arc also captured by a video 
ciuTiera and sent to a monitor on the first 
set .so die first actor may sec her ix:rfonii. 

'I'hc whole effect Ls stunning I'd love 
to tell you more, but I've been sworn to 
secrecy until the episode airs. Wlicn it 
d(K-s, I'm certain you'll re-cognize tiie sc"t. 
"\'ou'll .see Amigas on die .set. thougli dieir 
namcplatc"s will be covcre-d. 

More Uses for the Amiga 

After die day's filming on Amiizing Sto- 
ries, 1 sat with Itichard Ix-vvis :uid dis- 
cTissed what otlier uses Amigas have in 
die film industrv'. 

Leeds: What got you started using tlie 
Amiga? 



76 INARCH '87 



Lewis: Wc first lx.-gan usiiif; tlic An 
communicate witli directors on set de- 
sign. People who direct our tpisixlt's :trc 
working on a \;irict)' of projects ut llic 
same tinic. Yon don't get tlieni for a lot of 
time; you get tliem for only a fo\' min- 
utes — ;uid in those few minutes you ha\c 
to find out what you need \ery quickly. If 
you miss lliat oppoitunity, it may be a 
d;iy or two before you see tlicm ag^in. 
And you certainh' iicct! ;UI die time you 
can get to plan ;tiid design. 
Leeds: Can \'ou give me a sjxicific exam- 
ple of how tlie /\mig;i lielped you com- 
municate witli the directors? 




MtidilTi'il iriiL'iiij; of a < oiiviiir 880. 

Lewis: \X'e diti a story tliat involved an 
iiirfield mid .some planes taxiing iuxxind. 
We got a phottx-opy of the iiirlield huout 
ant! traced it using Aet^is Images on tlie 
Kuna graphics pad. Tliis giive tis an accu- 
rate reprcfientation of the itinways. We 
tlien added a jetliner, smaller iiircraft luid 
van that to<ik part in the story. Tlie run- 
ways co\er t\vo niifes of -.inrd. and we 
needed to know where everyone was 
gtjing and how long it wouki take. We 
;ilso liad to [xjsition tlie liglits for tlie 
night shots. Now we were uilking a lot of 
ligiits ;ind a long setuji — at least four or 
five nigliLs in a row. 

Using Aeiiis Aninuitor, we could see 
tlie relati\e movements of each element 
in tlie scene and could get a feel for 
wlierc problems could <xcur. TliLs way 
tlie director could sec ch;uiges he want- 
ed to make and convey tliem to us. 

'this technitiiie can be iise-d in :iny ac- 
tion scene. \\'e u.sed to use plastic models 
of cars and pkines and push them an)und 
on a l;irgc drawing of tlie set. But by us- 
ing llie Amig;i we c:ui dump tlie setup 
onto videotaix: and give a copy to the di- 
rector of photography, tlie stunt ctxirdin- 
ator, ;incl ajiy'one else who neetLs to know 
tlie action set|uence- 

In tlie siuiie episode we were using a 
Convair 88<) airplane. 1 t(X)k a bnxhure 
from the conip;uiy and traced tlie air- 



Pould then domcTip%itli a cok)r 
sdicme for tlie plane diat fit witli tlie rest 
of the storv'. I'sing Dcltixe Pahit fn)ni 
Ulectronic Arts, 1 could design a logo, 
slant the letters using she;tr. and put in 
tile st\iing lines and other elements to 
flesh out tlie iirt on tlie plane. 
Leeds: Gui you give me some otlier ex- 
amples of how the Amiga has made it 
easier for you to work with directt)rs? 
Lewis: Well, I t<x)k some photos of a 
house we were tising loi- an cpistxle. put 
them on the Kurta graphics pad. and 
traced tlie house in. 1 could tlien try dif- 
ferent p;unt schemes ;uid show tliem to 



"TheAtniga is the first 
computer that has the 
khui of features that 
make it usable for 
applications I use on a 
daily basis " 

tile director, I could ;il.so ch:mge die col- 
ors wliite tile director was watching until 
the combinations were just what he 
wanted. We tlien matchetl p:unt siunples 
ag;un.st tlie colors on the screen. 

Another episode ctinie up later In 
which we w;uited to use tJic same house 
but make it l(X)k diifeirnt. Wltli just a 
slij^it mcxlification to llie tUxir^say, some 
gingeriiread and a change in color, we 
had a ditfeirnt house. /Vnti in die second 
epi.sode we nee-ded die house to iKne a 
spook)' ch;iracter. This time tlie whole 
set was done in shades of gray. 
Leeds: You've got quite a lot of ecjuip- 
iiictit set up on your desk. Wliat ;ia- you 
presently using witli your /Vmiga? 
Lewis: In terms of iiarilware, \W got a 
Tecm;ir 20 megabyte hard disk drive 
witli a T-Card that has I megabyte of 
I^M, a Kurta .series 2 -bit graphics pad, 
:uid a Digivic-w video tligitizer. For .soft- 
ware 1 use Aegis AninuiKiK Aegis Images 
and Aegis Draw. I also use Deluxe Paint 
and Deluxe Video irom I'lectronic Art.s. 
Rir a spreadsheet I use Analyze { Hro\\ n- 
Vi'agll), for word prixessing I've used 
Textaxift h\ C^ommodore, but I've re- 
cently switched to Scribble (Brown- 
Wagli). I al,so use Flow (Nctv Horizons 
Software ) quite a bit. 
Leeds: Uliat kinds of things :ire you us- 
ing the non-grapliics software for? 



Lewis: I uscTJftffl'a k)t instead of a word 
pr(Kes.sor. R)r instimce. I use it while 
l(x)king at a nc^\■ script, trying to break fl 
scenes down into tJie elements. I tlien " 
u.se Atmlyze to budget out tlie cost of 
doing e:ich element in die script. Being 
;ilile to have both programs running at 
the .same time saves me a lot of time. I 
L~ui read tlirougli a script tor tlie first 
time, niiike notes, :uid build a prelimin;iry 
butlget all at tJie same lime. 
Leeds: I la\e you been using Digiview? 
Lewis: We had one story v\-here the main 
ch;inicter had been ;ui a\id world travel- 
er in his \c)utli ;md we needed to create 




House €()lur and di-tait.s are cli(i!<c.-n 

some pliotographs tliat would show 
travels. W'e got some photos from several 
stock agencies and planned to photo- 
composite his face onto the image. I 
wanted to check die la\()ut. so I u.sed the 
Digiview to digitize the stock photo. ;md 
then digitized a photo of my face. Using 
Deluxe Paint I could put m\ face in the 
photo ;ind then take screeashoLs of tlie 
results. We gave die screenshots to die 
retoucher who was doing die final com- 
p<»iting ;uid told liini to use diem as a 
guide. In reidit}', sonic of die stufi' we did 
with the Digiview w:ls g<xxl enougli to 
u.se as is. if we liad nol needed H X lO's, 
we niiglit ha\'e been able to use die shots 
riglit off die screen. 

Leeds: ''ibu iilso mentioned Ae^/s Draw. 
Lewis: With Aqi,is Draw I c;in tlraw a 
stage phin, siive it as one file, dieii dra\^' a 
set ;uid s;tve it :is another This way I c;m 
tT\ tlitferent jxisidons witli diat set on 
the stage to see which works best, seeing 
wdiedier diere may Ix; problems R'lative 
to c;uiiera placement or ligliting. Nor- 
mally we would do that widi paper ;uid 
pencil, but iLSing Aegis Draw m;ikes it 
simpler It's die first computer-aide-d de- 
sign system diat is cusy cnougli to be us- 
able in diLs industry. We have a lot of tur- 
nover ;uid c;ui't take a lot of time to train 
someone on a system. 

Cuitlimieil on pg. 126 



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ADVENTURE ROAD 



ISVSflAY ADDAMS 



Mapping Made 
Simple: 
Labyrinth and 
Amnesia 



JT rom 1982 until \9»\ I was lost in the 
maze in Zoi-k I. so I'm glad to sec con- 
tempt)r.in' ganitr tlcsigncrs an." m;iking 
thdr worlds e.usicr to map. Two recent 
cx;uiiplcs ;ire Anniesia and Uibyiinlh. 

Ixibyrinth Ls ;m animated ganie tliat is 
practically all-niaze. But a special over- 
head \'iew enables you to see iin aerial 
view of tile current li;dl so it c:in he cop- 
ied on paper Baset.1 on tJie Jini Ileason 
Muppet film, Labyhtitb opens with a 
brief idl-text f^ame in which you must 
find your vvAy to tlie theater where the 
film is showing. 

In a lx)rdcred lx)x like tliose seen in si- 
lent movies, the first illustration an- 
nounces The Movie Begins." Tlien tlie 
Goblin appears and spe:iks directly to 
you fn)m tlie screen. Me e\en uses your 
name, which yoii t\-]X' in ;iiong witli otli- 
er information before the game. The 
Ck)blin presents tlie challenge: \'on have 
been transported into his lab\rinth. 
where you will remain imprisonetl un- 
less you vaiu|uish him at tlie center of 
the maze. Tliere's a 13-hour time limit, 
and \'ou can ;Uways t)pe "time" to find 
out how much you'\e got left. 

The next phase of the program Ls auto- 
matically loaded and animation kicks in. 
A 2'/>-inch tall ch:iracter stands in tlie 
middle of a long brick-lined hall. De- 
pending on your previous input, the 
character will be male or female, liave 
hair the color you stated, and wiU be 
wearing a shirt tliat's your favorite ctilor. 
Now you can guide tlie chiiracter alxnit 
the halls by moving tlie joy.stick. To sim- 
ulate 3-D. the program enables you to 
move fonvard and backward as well as 
left and right. 'Hie graphics are simihir to 
those seen in Habitat. QuantLimLink's 
on-line ad\entun." (both are pnxluced by 
Lucusfilni Gamc-s ). 

Below the graphics, wiiich cover most 
of die screen, youll .see a long tliin bar 
that represenLs tlie liiill you're in. A blink- 
ing .st|u;ire sliov\s >-our current location, 
black ones indicate tlie location of ob- 



News and opinion from 
a leading explorer of 
those fantasy realms 
called advettture games 



jects, and white ones tell you where to 
find other people. Dtxirs leatling into Uic 
maze are iiLso shown, and you aui tell 
whetlier tliey itre o[xrn or closed. 

At tlie l-x)ttom of tlie screen tlie parser 
cx;cupic-s tvvo sni;dl windows. Tlie left 
one holds a list of \erbs; tlie other, nouns. 
T>pe tlie first letter of a word, and tlie ILst 
hops to tlie first wwrd Ix-ginning witli 
tliat letter Ibr ex:imple, t)ix- T luid tlie 
word t:ike is higliliglited. nien hit tlie 
cursor key to activate tile noun window 
;iiid follow tlie same pa)cess to find die 
object ycHi want to grab. (If there is only 
one item in sij^it. you c:ui ju.st hit RF.- 
TIIRN or the joystick button to t;tke it.) 
It's basic;ilh' a kiddie p:irscr willi a limiteti 
^•(x:abul:ln|■ — liiit at least \()u can scnjU 
through the windows to sec all the 
words, 'llie g;ime's text resjionses are 
usiKilh shown in a colored bubble at tlie 
tt)p of tlie screen, a technique alst> em- 
pkned in Habitat 

Inside tlie maze, graffiti Ls scrawled on 
tlie walls. 'ITiis m;irks secret tkxirs that 
lead deeper into tlie labyrintli. Dedicated 
adventurers will get to visit some of tlie 
imaginary- worlds created liy Henson, 
places like tlie Wise Man's Ciiirden ;ind 
the Hall of Stone Faces. Mupixt charac- 
ters — Hoggle. Sir IXdj-mus ;uid tlie Fir- 
eys — are stationed witliin tlie maze ;ind 
may help if you speak to them, The 
parser doesn't let you do more tliiui .say 
"Speak Hoggle," so character interaction 
is constrained. But most problems in- 
volve object manipulation, and you'll 
find m;uiy objects lying in phiin \iew in 
tlie h;il!. And \ending machines often sell 
useiiil items. 

You c;ui't just stroU along .scarfing up 
c-rystal balls iuid other valuables, for 6an- 
ger lurks inside tlie lab\ rintli. When you 
hear tlie sounds of a nuui in aniior chuik- 
ing down tlie hall, head for die nearest 
door. Otlierwise hell open a trap door 
that drops }'ou into a pit. "I'ou can buy 
\our wa\' out or iLse a magic word. Lln- 
fortunateh- a magic word costs you an 
hour of time. 

Either way you'll start at tlie lx;ginning 



of the maze (not tlie text game), \o\it po- 
sition is automaticidly s;i\ed. and when 
you reload tlie jirognuii, you just cIkkisc 
the game with your name beside it. 
Tliree different giuiies in jirogress may Ix- 
saved to die pnignun disk. 

Tlie sound eftects ;ire impressive, es- 
peci;illy that eerie h;ir|-»sichord music 
that accompanies the (ioblin's initial 
manifestation. Graphics and animation 
are siiiootli :ind refinetl, ;ind .some full- 
screen iliustratioas — like tliat of the Gob- 
lin — feature superb higlvrcsolution com- 
puter iut. You won't see :in)- of tiie fractal 
gnifihics tliat dominated tlie first 1jjc~:ls- 
filni g:imes. Witli its simple p;irser ;uitl 
jo)'stick interface, tlie g;iinc is aimed at 
adventurers 13 and under. You don't 
liave to be a Muppet fan to enjoy Laby- 
rintb, but it helps. 

I'll Take Manhattan 

Amnesia is lui ;dl-text game tliat .spares 
tlie reader/player from map-m;tking witli 
an e\cn more direct method — the tUxii- 
mentation includes a street map ol'.Man- 
liatt:ui where tlie g:mie t:d<c-s place. Iliat 
is ]")ractically a necessity, for Anniesia 
contaias 4,(KX) Ux:;itions ;ind 6S() streets! 
Ma]>i>ing tliis on your own could t;d<e 
years, and yoti would ha\e to rent a 
warehouse to store all the maps. You ;d.so 
get a map of tlie subway routes, .so you 
won't get lost in .Ne\\' York's iva! mazes. 

Doing away witli the need for map- 
ping gives you more time to appreciate 
die prose of auilior IlioniiLS A. liLscii — 
luid concentrate on sohing tlie ni)sier\' 
he 1i:ls devised. Disch is a no\'eli.st whose 
science fiction ;uid mysteries ha\e won 
many awards, but tliis Ls not ;ui adapta- 
tion of an existing work. Thougli Annw- 
sitt contains enougli text to fill a sm;ill 
novel, he wrote it specifically ;ls a text 
adventure. 

'Ilie story- begias wiien you awake in a 
hotel nxmi in Nc-w York, without clodies 
or a memon-. Before going luiy'where, 
you've got to find .somediing to we;u-. 
Tlicn you can set out to disco\er your 
identity- and how^ you lost it 

llie pet)ple you meet may help jog 
)-oiir nicmor%-, niere's a redneck 're.\;ui 
who calls you John (;;uiieron ;ind w;uils 
you to marn' his duigliter. A bag ladv 
acn)ss town h;LS a note you wrote to 
yourselt^ — a note she .sa\s \ou told her to 
hold for you in case sometliing like diis 
happened. Then diere's a bell clerk who 
calls you Xavier Hollings. whom it turns 

(.oiitiniicrt uii /j,if. 'Jfi 



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3939 Wisconsin Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20016 



We'll Give You Tomorrow. 



^ffl 



64 USERS ONLY 



mKI-:N\>l.\\\S()N 



Letter Right! 

for the 
Commodore 64 



vjo, you just got your first ConiiiKxlorc 
64 and a printer — and you're wondcrinj; 
what you can do with tliem. Well. Lx-ttcr 
Riglit! is just the prognuii for \()u! It is no 
top-of-thc-Unc word processor, but it 
d(xs a gcxxl job helpinj; you write per- 
st>rml or business letters riglit a\\'ay. 

The program ojx'iis witli a menu with 
eight selections. 'ITic first choice (A) se- 
lects letter case — upper-ciuscgraphics or 
upper-Zlower-ciLse (uscxl for most corre- 
spondence). Next ch(K)se whetlier \'oii 
wish single- or double-spacing ( B ). 

If you choose to skip choices A and B, 
they will defeult to upper-case and single 
spacing. respccti\'ely. Otherwise, .select- 
ing lower-case will also chiuige tlie letter 
cjLse on tlic screen to make it easier to re- 
member to capitalize letters as necessan- 

Now enter )'our name ( C ) and address 
(D). If you are tlie only person who is go- 
ing to use tlie prognmi. it is eas\- to cus- 
tomize. Just change line ^10 to 
NM S = "^'our name", change line 5-it) to 
AD S = "Your address", line 560 to 
CYS = "Your city", line 580 to 
SAS = "Your state" and line 600 to 
ZPS="Your zip code". Now when you 




Here is a simple word 
processor that lets 
you create a letter 
you can be proud of. 

chtwse C ;uid D, no entr)- will be neces- 
sar%-, altlioLigli you must still choose C 
and D to declare tlic \ariables. 

Next, select name of addressee (E) and 
enter that information. Do tlic s;ime witli 
tlie address of tlie addres.see ( T ). /\nd fi- 
n;ill\', chcxjse today's date ( G ). 

Letter Riglit! ^\■ill accept almost an>' 
form of cntr\- for tlie date, becau.sc line 
260 puts a douhle-tiiiote in ft-ont of the 
d;ite input. ;illo\\ing you to use pimctua- 
cit)n when entering die date (for exiun- 
ple,jan. 15, 1987). 

Now you're read\' to write. Here Ls 
your last chance to correct any mist;ikcs. 
Pressing KKTURN returns )0u to the 
main menu where you can make a 
diange. If you need to cli:uige oiil>' one 
selection, the otlier items will be pre- 
served and you ju.st hit H again to print. 

Vtlien you hit H, die screen prompts 
you to ad\'ance the paper to the top of 



tlie form. Tliis means to set the top of the 
sheet of paper e\en ^^'itil tlie top of tlie 
print liL-.id. When you hit tlie spaceh:u-. 
the printer automat ic:d]\- ad^•;mces ten 
lines and prints your address, cit}-, suite, 
zip code and date on tlie rij^it-hantl side, 
then mo\'es down to print die receiver's 
name cuid address on tlic left. The pro- 
gram dien prints die Sidutation line ;md 
nio'ves dt)wn to tlie suirt of tlie text. 

As was mentioned ciirlicr, this is n()t a 
top-of-the-line v\'ord processor. I"or in- 
stance, you must press tlie spacebar fi\e 
times to indent a new paragraph. A 
screen prompt warns you not to r\pe in 
more tlian two screen lines of text before 
pressing Itl-'IIJRN because of tlie 6 is 80- 
ch:tracter logical line limit. Any text o\er 
two lines long will be cut ot^' ;uid ;ill the 
text o\er two lines long will not hi: sent 
to tlie printer .So, Ix' c;irefTil here! 

\X hen you ;irc finished entering your 
text, just prc-ss RHllRN on a bhuik input 
line. This sends tlie pa>gnim to line 1 1 50, 
which prints tlie "Sincerely." ;uid your 
n;ime. tlien ends the pn)gnuii. lliere you 
ha\e it — a letter you c:ui be pn)ud ot^ 

'lliis progi-.un was written for a Cajiii- 
niodore-compatible printer. If \'our print- 
er doL'sn't recognize C^omnnxlore printer 
contn)l ccxJes. check your printer user's 
m;uiu:il lor tlie proper ctxJes to u.se in 
litiu .-^90 (tlie \;iriable SI') to set your 
printer tor double-spacing 

Letter Riglit! uses only -i.OlO bytes of 
memor\-. It c;m easily be customized for 
yoitf own applicadoas. g 



Before !>ping ihese programs, read "Hon- lo Enter ftograms. " and "How to Use the Magaane 
Entn- Program." Tlie BASIC prognms in this magazinf arc available on disk from Loadsur. 
P.O. Box 30007. Slireveport, LA "1 1 .WflOO', 1 -SOO-B.^I-Ifi?*. 



30 
60 

70 

80 

90 

100 

110 

120 

130 

140 



150 



160 



REM *** 
SP=0:PR 

:LC=0:G 
CLOSE 4 
PRINT" [ 
: 'ABHF 
REM ** 
: ' ABHV 
GOSUB 
PRINT" 
RVSJMA 
PRINT" 
[SPACE 
: PRINT 
PRINT" 
[SPACE 
PRINT" 
[SPACE 



Letter Right! 

LETTER RIGHT! ***'BSYD 
INT" [CLEAR] ":GOSUB 1210 
=0'FQHJ 
'BBLD 
CLEAR] '"BATF 

* MAIN MENU ***'BODX 



280:POKE 646,15'CKQA 

[HOME,DOWN3,RIGHT,SPACE14, 

IN MENU":PRINT: PRINT'DCUE 

[RIGHT2,RVS]A[RV0FF] . 

2] SELECT LETTER CASE" 

'CBWG 

[RIGHT2,RVS]B[RV0FF] . 

2] SELECT SPACING":PRINT'CBNG 

[RIGHT2,RVS)C[RV0FF] . 

2] SELECT NAME OF SENDER" 



170 

180 

190 

200 

210 
220 

230 

240 

250 
260 



:PRINT'CBQJ 

PRINT" (RIGHT2,RVS]D[RV0FF] . 
[SPACE2] SELECT ADDRESS OF SENDER" 
rPRINT'CBSL 

PRINT" [RIGHT2,RVS] E[RVOFF] . 
[SPACE2] SELECT NAME OF ADDRESSEE" 
: PRINT 'CBWM 

PRINT"[RIGHT2,RVS]F[RV0FF] . 
[SPACE2] SELECT ADDRESS OF 
ADDRESSEE" :PRINT 'CBYO 
PRINT" [RIGHT2,RVS]G[RV0FF] , 
[SPACE2] SELECT TODAY'S DATE" 
rPRINT'CBSE 

PRINT"[RIGHT2,RVS]H[RV0FF] . 
[SPACE2]BEGIN LETTER" 'BASC 
PRINT : PRINT" [RIGHT2,SPACE7,RVS] 
CHOOSE LETTER OF CHOICE" 'CBUG 
GET AS: IF A$=""THEN 230'EIED 
A=ASC(AS)-64:IF A<1 OR A>8 THEN 
230'IPGI 

ON A GOTO 360,430,500,530,620,650, 

700,760'CHHI 

POKE 198,0:POKE 631,34:POKE 198,1 

Cnntinited on pg. 84 



82 MARCH '87 



Have your 
Commodore^ 
look as smart 
as it works. 




Consolidate your 64, 64C and 128 system with the Command Center. 

Get your workspace back again. 

The Command Center will untangle your wires, 
unclutter your desk and put peripherals at your 
fingertips. Condensing your whole system into one 
compact unit, you might consider it the ultimate 
Commodore peripheral. You get Commodore value 
with the look of a more expensive system. 

Just look at all it includes: 

■ Built-in AC Power Strip with power surge and 
voltage spike protection, line noise filtering and 
power outlets. 

■ Built-in Drive/CPU Cooling Fan to prevent 
overheating. 

■ Modular Telephone Plug, with its own on- 
line/off-line telecommunications switch. (Option on 
64 and 64C). 

■ Master AC Switch for easy system power-up. 

■ Single or Dual Drive Configurations with the 
standard drive insert. 



With the 

Command Center. 

your system is 

compact and 

complete. 







Without the Command Center your Commodore 
periptierals look cluttered and take up most of your 
desk top. 



Many built-in conveniences add to the Command 
Center's value. 

•Corprrccore (5 a legisiefea tfacerrark o1 Commodore Eteclromcs Lia 






-e-ir 



Free 30-day trial offer 

and one-year warranty. 



For faster service, call 

1 -800-626-4582 toll-free 

1 -31 9-338-71 23 (Iowa Residents) 



KETEK P.O. Box 203 
Oakdale, lA 52319 

YES" Rush me a CommanO Center to 
complete my system. I may enjoy 11 tor up 
to 30 days and retum it for a full refund 

D64 S1 19 95 

n64C St29 95 

D 128 SI 49 95 

(Please include S3.50 for shipping and 
handling, I 



Cily 



Z'P 



Phone NumDef 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



64 USERS ONLY/LETTER RIGHT! 



Continued from pg. 82 

: RETURN: REM QUOTE MARKS ' FFAM 
270 t'ABHD 
280 PRINT" [CLEAR] ": REM *** BORDER 

LINE ***'CRPJ 
290 :'ABHF 
300 POKE 53281, 9:P0KE 53280,9 

:POKE 646,0'DVED 
310 FOR X=1024 TO 1063:POKE X,102:NEXT 

:FOR X=55296 TO 55335:POKE X,0 

:NEXT'KIEL 
320 FOR X=1103 TO 2023 STEP 40 

:POKE X,102:NEXT'GSHG 
325 FOR X=55375 TO 56295 STEP 40 

:POKE X,0:NEXT'GSTL 
330 FOR X=2023 TO 1984 STEP-1 

:POKE X,102:NEXT'HRTH 
335 FOR X=56295 TO 56256 STEP-1 

:POKE X,0:NEXT'HRIN 
340 FOR X=1984 TO 1024 STEP-40 

:POKE X,102:NEXT'HSOJ 
345 FOR X=56216 TO 55336 STEP-40 

:POKE X,0:lNlEXT'HSYO 
350 RETURN 'BAQC 
360 GOSUB 730'BDNE 
370 PRINT" [D0WN3,RVS]U[RV0FF] PPER OR 

[RVS]L[RVOFF] OWER CASE"'BAML 
380 GOSUB 740 'BDOG 
390 IF A$="L"THEN SP=7:PRINT CHR$(14) 

:GOTO S0'HNGN 
400 SP=0'BDHY 

410 IF A$<>"U"THEN 380'EFKC 
420 GOTO 80'BCPA 
430 GOSUB 730'BDNC 
440 PRINT" [RVS]S [RVOFF] IbJGLE OR [RVS] 

D[RVOFF]0UBLE [ S PACE2 ] SPACING" ' BAEK 
450 GOSUB 740'BDOE 

460 IF A$="D"THEN G=1:G0T0 80'FHBI 
470 G=0'BCPG 

480 IF A5<>"S"THEN 450 ' EFGJ 
490 GOTO 80'BCPH 
500 GOSUB 730'BDNA 
510 INPUT "YOUR NAME";NM$ 'BEXE 
520 GOTO 80'BCPB 
530 GOSUB 730'BDND 

540 INPUT"YOUR ADDRESS" ; AD$ ' BEHH 
550 PRINT'BACE 

560 INPUT "YOUR CITY"rCY$'BEWJ 
570 PRINT'BACG 

580 INPUT "YOUR STATE" ; SA9 ' BEML 
590 PRINT'BACI 

600 INPUT "YOUR ZIP CODE";ZP$'BEDF 
610 GOTO 80'BCPB 
620 GOSUB 730'BDND 

630 INPUT "NAME OF ADDRESSEE" ; NA$ ' BEI J 
640 GOTO 80'BCPE 
650 GOSUB 730: INPUT "STREET ADDRESS"; 

AA$'CIIL 
660 PRINT: INPUT"CITY";AC$'CFTJ 
670 PRINT : IN PUT" STATE"; AS $'CF IK 
680 PRINT:INPUT "ZIPCODE" ; AZ$ ' CFCM 
690 GOTO 80'BCPJ 
700 GOSUB 730'BDNC 



710 PRINT"TODAY'S DATE";: GOSUB 260; 

lINPUT DT$'DKTJ 
720 GOTO 80'BCPD 

7 30 PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN 8] "; : RETURN 'CCIG 
740 GET A$:IF A$=""THEN 740'EIKJ 
750 RETURN 'BAQG 
760 : 'ABHH 

770 REM *** WRITE ROUTINE ***'BSJN 
780 I'ABHJ 
790 G=0'BCPL 
800 PRINT" [CLEAR] " 'BATD 
810 PRINT" [RVS, SPACE5] POSITION PAPER 

TO TOP OF SHEET [SPACES] " 'BACN 
820 PRINT"(D0WN17, RIGHT, RVS] 

PRESS (SPACE) TO CONTINUE OR 

' RETURN ' " 'BABP 
822 PRINTtPRINT" [RIGHTS, RVS] 

ALONE TO RETURN TO MAIN 

MENU." 'CBCP 
824 GET A$:IF A$=""THEN 830'EIKM 
826 IF A$=CHRS(13)THEN 80'EITO 
828 IF A$=" "THEN 840'DFFP 
830 GOTO 824'BDNG 
840 PRINT" [CLEAR] BE SURE NOT TO ENTER 

MORE THAN TWO"'BAMQ 
850 PRINT"SCREEN LINES BEFORE HITTING 

[RVS] RETURN [RVOFF] , " ' BAMR 
860 PRINT"OR THE EXTRA WORDS WILL BE 

DROPPED. "'BAGS 
870 PRINT"PRESS [RVS ] RETURN [ RVOFF] 

WITHOUT ANY INPUT TO END."'BAWU 
880 PRINT"BEGIN LETTER WHEN THE 

CURSOR REAPPEARS.": PRINT 'CBLW 
890 OPEN 4,4,SP'BGCN 
900 FOR T=l TO 10;PRINT#4;NEXT 

:LC=LC+10'HOWK 
910 ZA$=CY$+","+SA$+" "+ZP$'FMVK 
920 PRINT#4,SPC(40)AD$:LC=LC+1'EOJK 
930 IF G=l THEN PRINT#4 : LC=LC+1 ' GJNM 
940 PRINT#4,SPC(40) ZA$ : LC=LC+1 ' EOGM 
950 IF G=l THEN PRINT#4 : LC=LC+1 ' GJNO 
960 PRINT#4,SPC(40)DT$:LC=LC+1'EODO 
970 FOR T=l TO 4:PRINT#4:NEXT 

:LC=LC+1'HMER 
980 ZB$=AC$+" ,"+AS$+" "+AZ$'FMIR 
990 PRINT#4,NA$:LC=LC+1'DLSQ 
1000 IF G=l THEN PRINT#4 : LC=LC+1 ' GJNY 
1010 PRINT#4,AA$:LC=LC+1'DLFX 
1020 IF G=l THEN PRINT#4 : LC=LC+1 ' GJNB 
1030 PRINT#4,ZB$:LC=LC+1'DLGA 
1040 FOR T=l TO 3:PRINT#4:NEXT 

:LC=LC+3'HHFE 
1050 IF SP=7 THEN PRINT#4," [SHFT D] 
EAR "NA$+",":LC=LC+1 
:GOTO 1070' ITLJ 
1060 PRINT#4,"DEAR "NA$+"," 

:LC=LC+1 ' ELQF 
1070 FOR T=l TO 3:PRINT#4:NEXT 

:LC=LC+4 ' HMGH 
1080 GOSUB 260'BDLC 
1090 A$="":INPUT A$'CFIE 
1100 IF A$=""THEN 1150 ' DGQW 

Coiitiiiiwd on pf;. 86 



84 MARCH '87 



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€ 1M7 The COMPUTER BOOK CLUB' P O Bon 90. Blue Rago Summil. PA 17214 



P^ TTia [jCTipular Ecc^ SlLfi 

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1016P 1082P 1501P 15B8P 16B8 1737 1746 1852 1858 
1899 1923P 193eP 1961 1969 1970 1983 1990 1993 
2685 2688 2691 2692 2705 2730 2732 2745 2748 



1874 ia76P 1S83P 1889 
2640P 2642 2650 2682 
2749 2756 2757 2782 



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ValkJ lor new members only. Foreign applicants will receive special ordering inslniOkins^ Canada 
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64 USERS ONLY/LETTER RIGHT! 



Conthtlieilfroni jig. fi-i 

1110 PRINT#4,A$:LC=LC+l'DKPy 

1120 IF G=l THEN PRINT#4 : LC=LC+1 ' GJNC 

1130 IF LC=>56 THEN FOR X=l TO 18 
:PRINT#4:NEXT:LC=8' KPEG 

1140 GOTO 1080'BEGY 

1150 PRINT#4:PRINT#4:PRINT#4'DFPB 

1160 IF SP=7 THEN PRINT#4 ,TAB ( 4 5 } " 

[SHFT S] INCERELY,":GOTO 1180'GNTJ 

1170 PRINT#4,TAB(45) "S INCERELY , " ' CFRG 

1180 PRINT»4:PRINT#4,TAB(45)NM$'DKQF 

1190 CLOSE 4'BBLD 

1200 END'BACU 

1210 :'ABHV 

1230 REM *** TITLE PAGE ***'BPQC 

1240 :'ABHY 

1260 POKE 53280, 0:POKE 53281,0 
:POKE 64 6,7 'DVXG 

1270 PRINT" [SPACE2,RVS,SPACE2,RVOFF, 
SPACE4 , RVS , S PACE4 , RVOFF, S PACE2 , 
RVS , S PACE4 , RVOFF , S PACE2 , RVS , 
SPACE4 , RVOFF , S PACE2 , RVS , S PACE4 , 
RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, SPACE3,CMDR *] 
"'BAKL 

1280 PRINT" [SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
SPACE4 , RVS , S PACE4 , RVOFF , S PACE2 , 
RVS, SPACE4, RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, 
SPACE4 , RVOFF , S PACE2 , RVS , S PACE4 , 
RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, SPACE4,CMDR *] 
" ' BARM 

1290 PRINT" [SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
SPACE4 , RVS , SPACE 2 , RVOFF, SPACES , 
RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE4 , RVS , 
S PACE 2 , RVOFF , S PACE 3 , RVS , S PACE2 , 
RVOFF, SPACE4, RVS] [RVOFF ,SPACE2 , 
RVS,SPACE2] "'BAPN 
1300 PRINT" [SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
SPACE4 , RVS , S PACE3 , RVOFF , S PACE4 , 
RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , SPACE4 , RVS , 
S PACE 2 , RVOFF , S PACE3 , RVS , SPACE3 , 
RVOFF , SPACE 3 , RVS , SPACE4 , RVOFF, 
SHFT POUND] " 'BAKF 
1310 PRINT" [SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
S PACE 4 , RVS , S PACE3 , RVOFF , S PACE4 , 
RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE4 , RVS , 
SPACE2 , RVOFF , SPACE 3 , RVS , S PACE3 , 
RVOFF, SPACE3, RVS, SPACE4,CMDR *] 
"'BARG 
1320 PRINT" [ SPACE 2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
SPACE4 , RVS , SPACE 2 , RVOFF, S PACES, 
RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE4 , RVS , 
SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE 3, RVS, SPACE2, 
RVOFF , SPACE4 , RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , 
CMDR *,RVS,SPACE2,CMDR *]"'BAAI 
13 30 PRINT" [ SPACE 2, RVS, SPACE4, RVOFF, 
SPACE2,RVS ,SPACE4 , RVOFF , SPACE3 , 
RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF , S PACE 4 , RVS , 
SPACE2 , RVOFF , SPACE3 , RVS , SPACE4 , 
RVOFF, SPACE 2, RVS, SPACE 2, RVOFF] 
[CMDR *,RVS,SPACE2) "'BAJJ 

1340 PRINT" [SPACE2, RVS, SPACE4, RVOFF, 
SPACE2 , RVS , SPACE4 , RVOFF , SPACE3 , 
RVS , SPACE 2 , RVOFF , SPACE 4 , RVS , 



SPACE2 , RVOFF, SPACE3 , RVS , SPACE4 , 
RVOFF , S PACE 2 , RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF , 
SPACE2,CMDR *,RVS] "'BAJK 

1350 PRINT" [DOWN4,RIGHT3,RVS,SPACE3, 
CMDR *, RVOFF, SPACE4, RVS, SPACE2, 
RVOFF, SPACE3, RVS, SHFT POUND, 
SPACE2,CMDR *, RVOFF, SPACE3 , RVS , 
S PACE2 , RVOFF] [ RVS , S PACE2 , RVOFF , 
SPACE2 , RVS , S PACE4 , RVOFF , SPACE2 , 
RVS] [RVOFF] "'BABN 

1360 PRINT"[SPACE3, RVS, SPACE4, CMDR *, 
RVOFF , S PACE3 , RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF , 
SPACE2, RVS, SHFT POUND] [RVOFF, 
SHFT POUND, CMDR * , RVS ] [CMDR *, 
RVOFF , S PAC E 2 , RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF ] 
[ RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF , S PACE 3 , RVS , 
SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE3, RVS] [RVOFF] 
"'BAFP 

1370 PRINT" [SPACE3, RVS] [RVOFF , SPACE2 , 
RVS, SPACE 2, RVOFF, SPACE 3, RVS, 
SPACE 2, RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, 
RVOFF , S PACE 2 , RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , 
SPACE2 , RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , SPACE3 , 
RVS , S PACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE 3 , RVS ] 
[RVOFF] "'BAVN 

1380 PRINT" [SPACE3, RVS, SPACE4, RVOFF, 
SHFT POUND, SPACE3, RVS, SPACE2, 
RVOFF , SPACE2 , RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , 
S PACE2 , RVS , S PACE 2 , RVOFF , SPACE2 , 
RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , SPACE3 , RVS , 
S PACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE3 , RVS ] [ RVOFF ] 
" ' BATO 

1390 PRINT" [SPACES, RVS, SPACE4, CMDR *, 
RVOFF, SPACE3 , RVS , SPACE 2 , RVOFF , 
SPACE2, RVS, SPACB2, CMDR *, RVOFF, 
SPACES , RVS , S PACE 5 , RVOFF , S PACE3 , 
RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , SPACE3 , RVS ] 
[RVOFF] " 'BAAP 

1400 PRINT" [SPACES, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, 
CMDR *, RVS, SPACE2, CMDR *, RVOFF, 
SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE 2, 
RVS , S PACE6 , RVOFF , SPACE2 , RVS , 
SPACE2, RVOFF] [ RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF , 
SPACES, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE3, 
RVS] [RVOFF] "'BAYI 

1410 PRINT" [ SPACE 3, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF] 
[CMDR *, RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE2, 
RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE2, CMDR *, 
RVS] [RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, SPACE2, 
RVOFF , SPACE 2 , RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF] 
[ RVS , S PACE2 , RVOFF , S PACE 3 , RVS , 
SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE2] " ' BAKJ 

1420 PRINT" [SPACE 3, RVS, SPACE 2, RVOFF, 

SPACE2,CMDR *,RVS] [RVOFF , SPACE2 , 
RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACE3, CMDR *, 
RVS, SPACE2, RVOFF, SHFT POUND, RVS] 
[ RVOFF , SPACE2 , RVS , SPACE 2 , RVOFF] 
[ RVS , SPACE2 , RVOFF, SPACE3 , RVS , 
SPACE2, RVOFF, SPACES, SHFT Q] " ' BADM 

1430 PRINT" [DOWN, SPACES, RVS] 

V2.5 1986 BY KENNY LAWSON " ' BAGH 

1440 FOR T=l TO 3500 : NEXT ' EHXE 

14S0 RETURN 'BAQC 



COD 



86 MARCH '87 



TE VEX = Software, Service, & Savings 



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64 USERS ONLY 




Addition 
Master 

for the 
Commodore 64 



JL liLs program solves alphamctic piiz- 
zIl'S, puzzles in wliich letters symbolize 
numbers in a stjindarcl addition configii- 
nition. Since each letter rtplaccs one dij>- 
it, tbc solution essentially becomes a 
code-brc-.iking cxercLse. You lia\e to de- 
duce tile message fijom tlic ctxled data. 

Tlie reiil challenge of tliese kinds of 
puzzles is time. Iliere are up to ten tligiLs 
represented luid tliere ma)' be up to ten 
factori;d potenliiil solutions (tJiat is, 10 * 
9 ♦ 8 • 7 * 6 * 5 * 4 * 3 ' 2 ' I, or 
.^,628,800 solutions). This is cle;irty too 
many .solutions to tn' in ;uiy reasonable 
amount of time. Regnrdle.ss of whether 
you attempt it manually or by computer, 
there has to be a way to simpltf>- the 
problem. 

Traditionally, human intellect has 
.solved die pu/jde by deduction, Tsing 
\';trious clues, you can eliminate \';irious 
combinations of digits, ;uid witli a rea- 
.sonable puzzle, make steady progress to- 
ward tlie solution. Evcnaially, when you 
run out of ideas, die 3.6 million stjjutions 
should be reduced to a more manage- 
able sum. ...say a dozen or two. It then be- 
comes a matter of brute strengtli to tr\- 
tlie remtuning combinations and find tlie 
one tliat works, ^bu may ^^■;mt to tn- this 
metlKKl on tlie s:tmple puzzles \oLir.sclf 
before feeding diem intt) tlie computer. 
If you do, ct)mpare your time widi the 
comjiuter to sec who does best. 

My bet is that you will .s<:(3n find the 
hum;ui .s<.)liition to be vers' time-consLim- 
ing — :uid somewhat unreliable. Howev- 
er, tlic computer :ilone would ;ilso hu\e 
considcralilc difficulty with 3.6 million 
combinations. In BASICS it could t;ike a 
couple of \^■eeks simply to generate ;ill 
tile solutions. let ;ilone test diem. 

Tlie prognuii has lx;en designed with 
teamwork in mind — ^to allow your intel- 
lect to work witli the computer As quiir- 
terback, you call the play: entering the 
puzzle ;uid siippK'ing as many clues as 
you c;ui find, "lour 6-1 dien runs witli the 
ball, using iLs raw number capabQities to 
find tlie solution. 



Temn up with your computer to solve word 
addition puzzles. 



Your Part 

The first step invoKes some brute 
strengtli on your p;irt — you have to t\pe 
ill tlic program. In spite of iLs lengdi, you 
must t\'pe carcfull)'. for a small typo 
could be critical. If you find it's ttxs long. 
\'Ou e;ui substitute 2020 (X)T() 500 ;uid 
leave out even-diing ;ii'ter that. Ilien widi 
a copy sccurel)' saved, run the pix)gnim 
;uid choose "addition" ft'om tlie menu. If 
you're using a printer, enter tile date. You 
dien must indicate die total number of 
lines in die puzzle, including the sum 
line, ;md enter each one individu:ill\-, 

Now for the deduction: By analyzing 
tile puzzle or using intuition, you ha\e to 
.supply some clues. Often the puzzle will 
ha\'e a clue supplied widi it; [ust enter 
tliLs directh. I-or example, if you deter- 
mine that a certain letter must be even, 
you can cut die nttmber of combinations 
by liiitf If )'ou c;ui specUy die exact value 
of a letter, die amount of computation 
willlx.-redLicedhy90">! 

Somedmcs the stnicture wiU Ix.* a give- 
away. Take a look at die first s:un[ile puz- 



zle about die guitar. You sli(juld be able 
to deduce diat die letter Ci must be 1, be- 
cause (i + S cannot possibly add up to 20. 
B\' a similiir pnx'es.s, die value of V) e;ui 
be detemiined ;uid entered as a clue. 

Computer's Part 

ik'cmi.se of die complexitj" of die pro- 
cess, die progiiun dt)es a lot of ern)r 
checking at tlie begimiLiig. 'Hie .solution 
docs take time, ;md it would be a shiune 
to waste it on a wild goose chase, a puz- 
zle diat is imj'>ossible, or a puzzle that has 
been entered wrong. All in ;ill. the em)r 
checking accounts for about '/i of die 
prognun's length. 

Once it gets rolling, the prognini sim- 
ply generates the remaining combina- 
tions ol 'digiLs and tests them. 'Hie rather 
Ciyptic subroutine beginning ai line 1^1 
is a'Sponsible for generating the digits, 
returning Uiem in die array U 1 ). 'llie sec- 
tion from line 5 to about 200 tests these 
tiigits in the puzzle; diis is done one col- 
umn at a time to eliminate un.succe.ssfi.il 
comliinations as (.[uickly as possible. 

W'idiout going into too much detail. 



88 MARCH '87 



64 USERS ONLY/ADD T ON MASTER 


here arc some of die key iirniy \ :iriables 


in lines 1 1 60 to 1 2 1 is a series of nested 


n-ij. 




1-LND 


Clue: 


and scetioas. 


ON statements usee 


to resolve a matrLx 


SOME 




ME 


GRIND 


L\S{) Holds tile viirious let- 


of clue combinatioas. 


TAIJ, 




HN-E 


Lsa 


ters 














stiuare 


S(X ) Molds the dues 


Extensions 




TAii:s 




GRINT) 




TR() Holds the value cur- 


M long :ls iilgorithms had to t>e includ- 










rently being tried 


ed to check for primes and squares. 1 










CO(r,c) Points to the letter 


added scp;irate menu items to access 


TTIJ. 


Clue: 


BUT 


Clue: 


held in n>\\ r cokimri 


these directly, 'lliex- 


ciui lie h;uxh- if, like 


Till-: 


TTIL 


LOOK 


it's a 


c, iiieiLsiiretl from Ilie 


me, ye)u are fiiscinatetl b\' experimenting 


WH01J-: 


is a 


A 


prime 


upper riglii 


witli miiiibers ;uid tlicir pixjpenies. 


.... 


prime 





Burr 


lines 265-365 Check clues 


The program could be reiidily trans- 


TRUTH 


number 


Bun 




IJncs 5^0-445 Display pu»:le and so- 


ported to otiier computers. Tlie m:iin 










lution 


changes would Ix- to screen foniiatling. 


Moderate to Hard: 




Lines 5(M)-85() Input aiul organi/.e 


jiriiiter access, and 


i few memory- kx'a- 










puzzle 


tions for .sound and 


scrceti color. 


HAVE 




DAIAI 




Lints lOOO-on Gather clues 


>X'hatevcr your computer, I hope that 


A 




SAW 


Clue: 


Tlicrc :ire a few more proi^.iniming 


you find tliis program interesting, and 


DRINK (ver>- 


A 


DALAI 


tricks that you mli^Iit fintl interestinj;. 


tliat it illustrate-s how \-our intellect ;uid 


DI-:,VK 


hard) 


WILD 


is 


After eacli puzzle has heen sohed. a sim- 


your computer c;ui complement one an- 


FIRED 




.... 


even 


ple cm quickly sweeps up the leltn\er 


odier to efficiently v 


lork togetlier. 







UAMA 




v;iriahlcs. loops luid submutine-s. 'Ilien, 






FRIEND 








DIM Is used to a'-c-stablish ;irr,iys. An un- 


Sample Puzzles 










usu;il step is tlie funher use ol'DlM to de- 


Fasy: 












fine non-iuray \;maliles in tlie piiiper or- 


TOO 


SO 


Clue: 


RIDE 


Clue: 


der Iliis ;dlo\vs tlie most Iretjuenth -used 




TOO 


THE 


Mtxm- 


WIDE 


SUDE 


\:iriables to Ix; reirievetl die fastest. Siini- 


GRI-AT 


TOO 


MtX)N 


Shine 


WILD 


isa 


l;irly, sniiill line nuinliers are useti fur tkst 


ST\R'r 


TOO 


DOES 


is 


WET 


sqiiitre 


retrieval of frcquenth-used parts of die 


AT 


HOT Clue; 





even 




numbei 


prognun. 


A 


ID TROT 


SHINE 




SIJDE 




Tlie subroutine at line 165 ser\es mul- 





is not 










tiple puqxjses. tlepeiiding on v\here it is 


GLIITAR 


TliOr prime 










entered. GOSl.'B 4~5 will jiroduce a 






BOSS 




ITS 




beep; GOSUB 470 waits for a ke\press, 


WAS 


WHAT 


AT 


Clue: 


SO 


Clue: 


then Ix-eps. GOSUB 465 beeps, waits. 


THAT Clue: 


A Que: 


FOOT 


the BOSS 


TASTY 


TOAST 


tiien Ixxps agiiiii. Note t<Hi diat the sub- 


AiJ, WAS 


GRE.\r WASTE 


BAIJ. 


Ls even- 


TO 


hits a 


njutine calls iLself from line i65. which 


Ls a 


- - - - is 


.... 


minded 


.... 


prime 


m;ikes it reciirsi%c. Hie uniisiuil stnictiia' 


RIGHT squ:ire 


\X/VSTTi e\en 


FAILS 




TOAST 


ULSte 9 


Before t)ping these program.^, trad "How ttt Enicr PrograiM." anil "How lo Use [ht Magaziiic 


60 TJ=TJ■^TR(CO(I,C) ) 


'CPQH 






Entn- Program.' The B.yiC programs in ihh majiazinc ift ivillahlc on dist from Loidstar. 


65 NEXT:CA(C) 


=INT(TJ/10) 






P.O. B«\ Mm-. StirtTtport. U "lUdflOir. 1 Vww.M 2f.';4 




:TJ=TJ-10* 


CA(C) :IF RP(C)THEN 


IF TJ 






THEN 10'LJDW 








Addition Master 




70 IF RP{C)THEN 105' 


CIDF 










75 A=CO(R,C) : 


IF A THEN IF SX(C)THEN | 


1 LN$ = " "'BDJC 




90'FREP 










2 GOTO 2000 'BEYB 




80 IF TJ=TR(A)THEN 105'DKEI 






5 C=MA:IF SX(C)THEN U(TR(CO(R, 


85 GOTO 10 'ECU 








C) ) ) = . 'EYDL 




90 IF U(TJ)THEN 10'CHOH 






10 IF N THEN 35'CDGX 




95 SJ=SO(A) :GOSUB 270:IF Al 


=.THEN 1 


15 F=.:C=C-1:IF C=.THEN RETURN'HJTI 


10'FRCR 










20 IF SX(C)THEN U(TR(CO(R, 


C) ) )=. 'DUUE 


100 TR(A)=TJ: 


U{TJ)=1 


'COHY 






25 N=ND(C):IF N=.THEN 15'ELMI 


105 C=C-i-l:IF 


C>MA THEN 120' 


FKWF 




30 FOR 1=1 TO N:L{I)=TR(DI (C,I> ) 


110 Al=. :N=ND(C) :IF 


N=.THEN 


50'FPBC 1 


:NEXT'FUKG 




115 GOSUB 252 


:GOTO 40'CGBD 






35 GOSUB 258:IF F THEN 15' 


DHRH 


120 TJ=CA(MA) 


:IF TJ= 


.THEN ON LR-MA+1 | 


40 FOR 1=1 TO N:TJ=L(I):SJ 


=SO(DI(C,I)) 


GOTO 15 5, 


5' IWAH 








:GOSUB 270:IF Al=.THEN 


35' JJQN 


125 IF LR=MA 


THEN 5' 


DFSF 






45 TR(DI (C,I) )=TJ:NEXT'COCJ 


130 A=CO(R,LR) :IF SX(C)=.THEN 150'ETTF | 


50 TJ=CA(C-1) :FOR 1=1 TO R 


-1 


135 IF U(TJ)THEN 5'CGUF 






:IF OLEN (RW${I) )THEN 65*KAQN 


140 SJ=SO(A) : 


GOSUB 270:IF A1=.THEN | 


55 IF RP(C)=I THEN 65'DIFJ 















COMMODORE MAGAZINE 89 



64 USERS ONLY/ADD TON MASTER 




5'FQNF 


305 


Al=ABS(2.5-ABS(TJ-5) )-.5 


145 


TR(A) =TJ:U(TJ)=1:G0T0 I55'DSUK 




: RETURN 'HPWJ 


150 


IF TR(A)-TJ THEN 5'DIGD 


340 


: 'ABHB 


155 


N=ND{12):IF N=.THE« 192'ENXK 


345 


REM PRIME TEST'BJAJ 


160 


GOSUB 252:GOTO 185'CHJD 


350 


IF A<4 THEN Al=0 : RETURN ' FGRG 


165 


IF N=.THEN 175'DFCI 


355 


IF A/2=INT (A/2) THEN Al=2 


170 


GOSUB 258:IF F=.THEN 185'EJQG 




: RETURN' IKVO 


175 


IF SX{LR)THEN U(TR(CO(R, 


360 


FOR Al=3 TO SQR(A)STEP 2 




LR) ) )=. 'DWVO 




:IF A/A1=INT(A/A1)THEN RETURN'MQVO 


180 


C=MA:F=. :GOTO 20'DJIH 


365 


NEXT: A1=0: RETURN ' DFPK 


185 


FOR 1=1 TO N:TJ=L(I) 


370 


PRINT" [CLEAR]"; :REM DISPLAY 




:SJ=S0(DI(12,I)) :GOSUB 270 




PUZZLE'CPXK 




:IF A1=.THEN 170'JLVV 


375 


FOR 1=1 TO R'DDML 


190 


TR(DI (12,I))=TJ:NEXT'CPJI 


380 


IF I=R THEN PRINT SPC ( 15-LR) LEFT$ 


192 


FOR 1=1 TO R:IF TR(CO(I, 




(LN$,LR) 'HPEN 




LEN(RW$ (I) )) )=,THEN 165'HBJQ 


385 


PRINT SPC(15-LEN(RW$(I)))RW$(I) 


195 


IF CL(I)=0 THEN 230'DJJM 




:NEXT:PRINT'GTIR 


200 


A=0:FOR A1=LEN (RW$(I) )T0 1 STEP-1 


390 


FOR 1=0 TO NC:PRINT CS$(I):NEXT 


202 


:A=10*A+TR(CO(I ,A1)) :NEXT'LIUK 


395 


:PRINT:RETURN'HOTN 

REM DISPLAY SOLUTION ' BPIQ 


IF CL(I)>2 THEN 215'DJNB 


205 


GOSUB 350:IF CL{I)+(A1>0)=1 THEN 


400 


PRINT SPC(ll) "SOLUTION NO."S 




230'GSCI 




: PRINT SPC (9) "=================== 


210 


GOTO 165'BDLX 




"'EHFK 


215 


IF CL(I)>4 THEN 230'DJMF 


405 


PRINT SPC(9)"TIME SO FAR: "B$ 


220 


B=INT(SQR(A) *A2) :Al=3 




:PRINT'DFOJ 




:IF A=B*B THEN Al=4'KTUI 


410 


FOR 1=1 TO R:A1=LEN(RW$ (I) ) 'FOXF 


225 


IF CL(I)=A1 THEN 165'DKBH 


415 


IF I=R THEN PRINT S PC ( 13-LR) LEFT? 


230 


NEXT I:B$=TI$:S=S+1 




(LN$,LR) SPC (15-LR) LEFT$ (LN$, 




:IF S=l THEN GOSUB 475:GOTO 235 




LR) 'KDIR 




:REM SOLUTION ' KFNM 


420 


PRINT SPC(13-A1) RWS(I)SPC(15-A1) ; 


232 


PRINT"... NEXT SOLUTION READY"; 


* 


'FRUG 




'BBDI 


425 


FOR A=A1 TO 1 STEP-1 


2 33 


IF P<4 THEN GOSUB 465'EFXF 




:PRINT CHR${48+TR(C0(I,A) ) ) ; 


235 


PRINT" [CLEAR] "; iGOSUB 400 




:NEXT' JXYP 




:IF P THEN CMD P:GOSUB 400 


430 


PRINT : NEXT : PRINT ' DCOD 




:PRINT#P'HOHL 


435 


FOR 1=1 TO NM: PRINT" [SPACE2] 


240 


PRINT:PRINT". . .BACK TO WORK "; 




"IN$ (I) ; : NEXT: PRINT' GOEN 




'CCXF 


440 


PRINT" "; :FOR 1=1 TO NM 


245 


TI$=B$:GOTO 165'CJFI 




:PRINT TR(I) ; :NEXT:PRINT'HPVJ 


250 


: 'ABHB 


445 


PRINT:FOR 1=1 TO NC:PRINT CS$(I) 


251 


REM SUBROUTINES 'BLQF 




:NEXT'GNBN 


252 


I=1'BCSE 


450 


RETURN 'BAQD 


253 


L{I)=-1'CFPG 


455 


: ' ABHI 


254 


L(I)=L(I)+1: IF U(L(I))THEN IF 


460 


REM INPUT AND BEEP'BMOI 




L{I) <9 THEN 254'HAOO 


465 


GOSUB 475:REM BEEP'CISM 


255 


IF L(I)=9 THEN IF U(9)THEN 


470 


WAIT 198,3:GET A$:PRINT A$; 




259'FMEL 




:POKE 198,0'ESVL 


256 


U(L(I))=1:IF KN THEN 1 = 1 + 1 


475 


POKE 54296, 15:F0R 1=1 TO 20:NEXT 




:GOTO 253'HSKP 




:P0KE 54296, 0:RETURN'HXSS 


257 


RETURN 'BAQI 


490 


: 'ABHH 


258 


FOR I=N TO 1 STEP-1:U{L(I) )=. 


495 


REM ENTER PUZZLE'BLVP 




:IF L(I)<9 THEN 254'JWMT 


500 


GOSUB 900:GOTO 520'CHCB 


259 


NEXT :F=1: RETURN 'DEWM 


510 


PRINT:PRINT"I 'M NOT PROGRAMMED 


260 


: 'ABHC 




FOR THAT!"'CBPI 


265 


REM CHECK CLUES 'BKEK 


520 


CLRiDIM I,C,N,TJ,A,A1,SJ,R 


270 


A1=0:ON SJ-9 GOTO 275,275,280,290, 




:A2=1+2E-7'FBKK 




295,300,305'EJIM 


525 


IF PEEK(828)THEN P=4:0PEN P,P'FLSL 


275 


A1=SJ+TJ+1 AND 1: RETURN 'FJON 


530 


DIM L(ll) ,U(11) ,TR(10) ,DI(12,10) , 


230 


IF TJ<3 THEN A1=TJ'EHTI 




RP(ll) ,CA(12) ,C0(11,11) ,SO(10) , 


285 


RETURN 'BAQ J 




RW${11) 'BRUQ 


290 


A1=1:RETURN'CEDH 


535 


DIM SX(20) ,ND(12) ,SL(20,10) , 


295 


A1=ABS (3-ABS (TJ-5) ) =1 t RETURN ' HMGR 




CL{11) ,CS${30) ,SL$(20) 'BVLR 


300 


A1=TJ : RETURN ' CFMY 







90 MARCH '87 



64 USERS ONLY/ADDITION MASTER 



540 GOSUB 475'BDTE 

542 PRINT" [GRAY3, DOWN] THERE MUST BE 

BETWEEN 3 AND 11 LINES, 
INCLUDING THE SUM."'BAGU 
545 INPUT"HOW MANY LINES (0 TO QUIT) 

";R:IF R=0 THEN RUN'FFWT 
550 IF R<3 OR R>11 THEN 510'FIVJ 
555 PRINT: PRINT"ENTER EACH LINE 

SEPARATELY:": PRINT 'DCLS 
560 FOR 1=1 TO R'DDMH 
565 INPUT RW$(I):IF LEN ( RW$ ( I ) ) >10 

THEN 510'FUWR 
570 IF LEN(RW$(I) )=0 THEN 510'EMLL 
575 NEXT:PRINT'CBJM 

580 CS$(0)="NO LEADING ZEROS" 'BGTN 
585 LR=LEN(RW$(R) ) :GOSUB 370'DOCR 
590 FOR 1=1 TO R:B=LEN(RW$ (I) ) 

:IF I=R THEN 610'ITFR 
600 IF B=MA THEN A1=A1+1'FILF 
605 IF B>MA THEN A1=0 : MA=B ' FKTK 
610 FOR N=l TO B:A$=LEFT$ (RIGHT? (RW$ 

(I) ,N) ,1) 'GUOJ 
615 IF ASC(A$)<65 THEN A=0 : IN? (0) =A$ 

:L(0)=1:GOTO 635'ICXQ 
620 FOR A=l TO 10:IF IN$ ( A) =A$THEN 

635'GQYJ 
625 IF IN$(A)=""THEN IN$ ( A) =A$ : NM=A 

:GOTO 635'GWOP 
630 NEXT:NM==11'CFGF 
635 CO(I,N)=A'BICK 
640 NEXT N,I 'BDSF 

645 IF MA>LR OR LR>MA+1 THEN 510'GMNQ 
650 PRINT" [D0WN2] I FOUND"NM"LETTERS 

: [DOWN]": IF NM<2 OR NM>10 THEN 

510'GNYQ 
655 FOR 1=1 TO NM:PRINT" "IW$(I); 

:S0(I)=13:TR(I) =10 : NEXT: PRINT ' IFXW 
660 IF LR=MA THEN 675'DHCJ 
665 IF Al=l THEN SO (A) =12 ' EKHP 
670 IF A1 = THEN TR (A) =1 : SO (A) =1 

:U{I)=1:L(A) =1:NC=1 

:CS$(1)=IN$(A)+"MUST BE 1"'KUUA 
672 IF A1=0 THEN CS S ( 1) = IN$ (A) +" MUST 

BE 1"'FPKR 
675 GOSUB 1000: REM CLUES 'CKVP 
680 FOR 1=1 TO R:A=CO(t,LEN(RW$(I) ) ) 

:IF S0(A)=13 THEN SO ( A) =15 ' JJOV 
685 IF SO(A)=0 THEN PRINT CS${0) 

:PRINT IN? (A)" CAN'T BE ZEROJ" 

:GOTO 510'GXCA 
690 NEXT'BAEJ 
695 GOSUB 370'BDNP 
700 PRINT" [WHITE] PLEASE ALLOW A FEW 

MINUTES. [DOWN] "'BATI 
705 PRINT"1 [SPACE2] PROCEED" ' BAUJ 
710 PRINT" 2 [SPACE2] CANCEL" 'BAIE 
715 GOSUB 465:IF A$="2"THEN 520'EJUL 
720 IF A$<>"1"THEN 695'EFIG 
725 TI$="000000":PRINT"[DOWN] 

THINKING. . . [DOWN] "'CEBO 
730 FOR C=l TO MA:I=0:FOR N=l TO R-1 

:IF C>LEN(RW$(N) )THEN 750'MATR 



735 A=CO(N,C):IF L(A)OR A=0 THEN 

750'FSAQ 
740 IF RP(C)=0 THEN IF A=CO(R, 

C)THEN RP(C)=N:GOTO 750'IYRP 
745 I=I+1:DI (C,I)=A:L(A)=1'ESUQ 
750 NEXT:ND{C) =1: IF L{CO(R, 

C))OR RP(C)THEN 760'FBNP 
755 L(CO(R,C) )=1:SX(C) =1'CSCQ 
760 NEXT:IF LR>MA THEN IF L(CO(R, 

LR))=0 THEN L(CO(R,LR) ) =1 

:SX(LR)=1' JMBV 
765 I=0:FOR C=l TO MA:A=CO(R,C) 

:IF L(A)THEN 775'HYBV 
770 I=I+1:DI {12,I)=A:L(A)=1'ETC0 
775 NEXT:ND(12)=I:C=1'DLRR 
800 GOSUB 110: REM SOLUTION ' CMAG 
810 B$=TI$:GOSUB 475:PRINT" TOTAL TIME 

: "B$'DMHK 
815 IF P THEN CMD P: PRINT" TOTAL TIME 

: "B$:PRINT#P'FHHQ 
820 IF S THEN PRINT" [DOWN] 

NO MORE SOLUTIONS":GOTO 520'EFTM 
825 IF P THEN CMD P:GOSUB 375 

:PRINT" SORRY.. NO SOLUTION FOUND" 

:PRINT#P'GJPV 
830 GOSUB 375:PRINT"SORRY. . NO 

SOLUTION FOUND" :GOTO 520'DIUP 
890 : 'ABHL 

895 REM INSTRUCTIONS 'BMRU 
900 PRINT" [CLEAR] "/'ADDITION PUZZLE" 

: PRINT, "+++++++++++++++" 

:PRINT'DEJN 
905 PRINT"THIS PROGRAM SOLVES 

ALPHAMETIC ADDITION PUZZLES OF 

THIS TYPE: "'SANA 
910 PRINT:PRINT" [SPACE3]WAS" 

:PR1NT" [SPACE2] THAT" 

: PRINT" [SPACE3] ALL"'EDRL 

912 PRINT" ":PRINT" RIGHT" "CBVK 

915 PRINT: PRINT"EACH LETTER STANDS 

FOR A DIFFERENT DIGIT" 'CBSV 
920 PRINT"SIMPLY ENTER THE PUZZLE 

WHEN PROMPTED. "'BAAQ 
925 PRINT"ALLOW SEVERAL MINUTES FOR 

THE SOLUTION." 'BAGV 
930 PRINT:PRINT"ANY CLUES YOU CAN 

OFFER WILL SPEED THE"'CBDR 
935 PRINT"PROCESS. [SPACE2] 

IN THIS EXAMPLE, R MUST BE 1; 

"'BADV 
940 PRINT"IT IS GIVEN THAT 'WAS' MUST 

BE SQUARE." 'BAFR 
950 PRINT" [DOWN] USING A PRINTER? 

Y/N"'BABO 
955 GOSUB 465:PRINT" [CLEAR] "'CEVP 
960 IF A$<>"Y"THEN POKE 828,0 

: RETURN 'GICO 
965 PRINT:PRINT"ENTER THE DATE {NO 

COMMAS) ": INPUT A$ ' DEFX 
970 POKE 828,4:OPEN 4,4'CJGN 
975 PRINT#4,CHR$(14) "**ADDITION 

MASTER** "AS'CIKW 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 91 



64 USERS ONLY/ADD T ON MASTER 








:"'CHIG 


980 RETURN 'BAQL 


1370 


PRINT;PRINT"1 PRIME?" 


990 : 


'ABHM 




:PRINT"2 NOT PRIME?'"DCXK 


995 REM GET CLUES 'BUT 


1380 


PRINT"3 SQUARE?" :PRINT"4 NOT 


1000 


PRINT: PRINT"CAN YOU OFFER ANY 




SQUARE?"'CBLL 




CLUES? Y/N"'CBUB 


1390 


PRINT"5 0DD?":PRINT"6 EVEN?"'CBOJ 


1010 


OS 5 (21) ="PRIME":CS$ (22) ="NOT 


1400 


PRINT"PRESS A NUMBER ."' BAUB 




PRIME" :CS§ (23) ="SQUARE" ' DXWG 


1410 


GOSUB 465:B=VAL(A$) 


1020 


CS$C24)="NOT SQUARE" 




:IF B = OR B>6 THEN 1090' ISIH 




:CS$ (26) ="EVEN":CS$(27)="ODD" 


1420 


I=C0(A,1) :NC=NC+1: IF B<5 THEN 




:CS$ (28)="1 OR 2"'EGEK 




1440'GVUH 


1030 


GOSUB 465:IF AS="N"THEN 


1430 


CSS(NC)=RW$(A)+" IS "+CS$(32-B) 




RETURN 'FGOA 




:TJ=16-B:A$=IN$(I) :GOTO 1140'IQWP 


1040 


GOSUB 370:PRINT:PRINT"PRESS THE 


1440 


CL(A) =B:CSS(NC)=RW$(A)+" IS 




LETTER THE CLUE IS FOR."'DFKI 




"+CS$ (B+20) 'FDJL 


1050 


PRINT"TO SPECIFY A LINE, 


1450 


IF LEN (RW$(A) ) <=8 THEN 1460'FNNI 




PRESS THE SPACE BAR:"'BAEI 


1455 


CL(A)=0:PRINT"I CAN'T ENSURE 


1060 


GOSUB 470: IF A$=" "THEN 1350 'EKWD 




THAT" :CSS (NC) =CS$ (NC) +"??" ' EWTU 


1070 


FOR 1=1 TO NM:IF IN$(I)=A$THEN 


1460 


IF LEN(RW$(A) )=1 THEN 1320'ENCI 




1100'GRIH 


1470 


ON B GOTO 1490,1320,1530, 


1080 


NEXT'BAEB 




1320'CUDJ 


1090 


PRINT A$"???":GOTO 1330'CHVF 


1480 


I'ABHF 


1100 


PRINT:PRINT"PRESS THE VALUE OF 


1490 


S0=S0(I)+1'CIGJ 




THE LETTER "'A$"', OR..."'CDQF 


1495 


ON SO GOTO 505,1320,510,1320,510, 


1110 


PRINT"A[SPACE2] IF EVEN" 




510,510,1320,510,1320,510,1510, 




:PRINT"B[SPACE2] IF ODD" 




1570'CJYX 




:PRINT"C[SPACE2] IF IT COULD BE 1 


1500 


IF S0(I)=16 THEN 510'DKDC 




OR 2"'DCAH 


1510 


SOd) =14:G0T0 1320'CMTC 


1120 


WAIT 198,3:GET B$ : TJ=ASC (B$) 


1520 


: 'ABHA 




-48+7* (B$>"9") ' IWHG 


1530 


ON S0(I)+1 GOTO 1320,1320,510, 


1130 


IF TJ<0 OR TJ>12 THEN 1090 'FLWC 




510,1320,1320,1320,510,510,1320, 


1140 


SJ=SO(I):IF TJ<10 THEN 1230'EQKE 




1320'DGUN 


1150 


IF SJ<10 THEN PRINT A$" IS"SJ 


1540 


ON SO(I)-10 GOTO 1320,1570,1550, 




:GOTO 13 30 'FNWF 




510'DARI 


1160 


ON SJ-9 GOTO 1170,1180,1190,1310, 


1550 


S0(I)=16:G0T0 1320'CMVG 




1200, 1310, 1210'DMSJ 


1560 


: ' ABHE 


1170 


ON TJ-9 GOTO 1090, 510, 1580'DQIG 


1570 


A=1:G0T0 1590'CHGH 


1180 


ON TJ-9 GOTO 510, 1090, 1570'DQHH 


1580 


A=2'BCLH 


1190 


ON TJ-9 GOTO 1590, 1570, 1090'DROI 


1590 


S0(1)=A:TR{I)=A:U(A)=1:L(I)=1 


1200 


ON TJ-9 GOTO 510, 1310, 1570'DQCA 




:NC=NC+1'GG0S 


1210 


ON TJ-9 GOTO 1310,1310, 1570'DRYB 


1600 


CS$(NC)=IN$(I) +" MUST BE"+STR$(A) 


1230 


IF SJ=TJ THEN 1090'DIHB 




iGOTO 1280'FVPI 


1240 


IF SJ<i0 THEN 510'DHUC 


1990 


: 'ABHL 


1250 


GOSUB 270:IF A1=0 THEN 510'EKXE 


1995 


REM TITLE SCREEN'BLIT 


1260 


NC=NC+1:CSS{NC)=IN${I)+" MUST 


2000 


POKE 54273, 50:POKE 54278,243 




BE"+STR$(TJ) 'GXSM 




:POKE 54276, 33'DCFB 


1270 


U(TJ)=l:L(I)=ltTR(I)=TJ 


2010 


POKE 53269, 0:POKE 53281, 0'CPSY 




:SO(I)=TJ'EDKL 


2020 


PRINT" [CLEAR, L. RED , RVS , SPACE6 ] 


1280 


FOR N=l TO NM:IF I=N THEN 




* * * ADDITION [SPACE2] 




1300'GLFJ 




MASTER * * *[SPACE6,L. BLUE] 


1290 


IF TJ=SO(N)THEN PRINT 




" "BAZG 




rPRINT INS(I)" & "IN$(N)" CAN'T 


2030 


PRINT:PRINT"BY IAN ADAM"'CBIB 




BOTH BE"TJ:GOTO 510'GBRR 


2040 


PRINT:PRINT"WOULD YOU LIKE:"'CBJD 


1300 


NEXT:GOTO 1320'CFLX 


2050 


PRINT:PRINT"1. ADDITION 


1310 


S0{I)=TJ:NC=NC+1:CS$(NC)=IN$(I) 




PUZZLE" 'CBFF 




+" MUST BE "+CS$ (TJ+16) 'HLYM 


2060 


PRINT"2. PRIME NUMBERS "' BAXE 


1320 


PRINT:PRINT CS$(NC)'CIIB 


2070 


PRINT"3. SQUARES" 'BAUE 


1330 


PRINT"ANY MORE CLUES? Y/N" 


2080 


PRINT:PRINT"0. END"'CBWE 




:GOTO 1030'CFJG 


2090 


GOSUB 465'BDSE 


1340 


: 'ABHA 


2100 


ON VAL{A$)GOTO 500 , 2500 , 3000 ' DRMA 


1350 


PRINT: INPUT"LINE NUMBER";A 


2110 


END'BACV 




:IF A<1 OR A>R THEN 1090'HMLL 


2490 


: 'ABHH 


1360 


PRINT:PRINT RW$(A)" - IS IT 




Coittmued (in fig. 128 



92 MARCH '87 



64 USERS ONLY 



BY PAUL G. MULVANE^'. Ill 



ITM 

for the 
Commodore 64 



k3o tlitrt- 1 w;ls. on tlic roatl to Giilwa\^ 
to bu\' a fo\' hologninis ;ind maybe a pint 
(or was it the oUicr way around';' ) when 
along comes thLs wee feller, a real micro- 
chip off the or sod he was, bein' all 
dressed in a fine green suit so he looketl 
like Michael Jackson, but with a red 
bowler set askew on his head, oh, maybe 
17 degrees or so. 

And this is no lie — he says to mcsclf, 
he says, "Och! You'\e seen me no\^■. )-oii 
big de\'il, ;ind I'll ha\e to grant you tlirce 
wishes!" — not that 1 belic\-ed him for a 
moment for this is tlie computer age. 
Bugs I know of — but tlic wcc folk? 

"Tell me," inquires yer servant, "if 
you'd be a leprechaun ..." 

"Heck yes!" .s;iys he, only not so polite- 
ly, "and don't be w;istin' any more wish- 
es — ^that was your first." 

"Well, I could see now that caution w:ls 
the watchword wid: these elfin folk, wj I 
tries to be cute: "Give me a nine" I say, 
knowin' full well he hadn't a fiddle or tin- 
whisde. Surely, diat would test liim, if he 
were real or not. Well, fast as a bill after 
Christmas, he reaches into his w;ii.stcoat 
and pulls out a tlopp)' disk and a listing! 

■^bu didn't e\en ha\c the daycency to 
specift' the toide of da tune nor make 
mention of the son of dance \ou'd be 




/.\ 



^• 



Let your 

Commodore 64 

generate Irish 

jigs and reels. 



doin' for my amusement," the little man 
cackled, "so I'll have to be given you all of 

dicm!" 

"Are you tcUin' me then diat this pro- 
gram will generate all the jigs and reels 
there are?" And 1 was hopin' b}- now die 
answer to that one wasn't anodier wish! 
But he was lost in elfin thought by now 
and didn't seem to nodce. 

".At line 10 \ou pick jigs, wfiich ha\e 8 
bars of 6 '/h notes, or reels, which have 8 
of 8. \z line 24, the last note is set into a 
chord suggested b>' tlie '/2-wa\' to die htst 
note; it can be die same, or a third or a 
fiftli apart, or even an octa\e. Line 29 just 
makes bars 5 and 6 repeat bars 1 ;uid 2 — 
a lot of old tunes do this. Lines .^2-34 pre- 
\ent any intervals larger than a fifth — un- 
less you'd be jumpin' octa\es on me, lad." 

"Not I," I stammered, but he went on. 

"Line 37 — if it takes 3 or so notes to 
chord, and you'd be ha\in' a chord one 
of even- 5 or so times, 'well most of the 
notes will start to sound like chord pro- 
gressions." 

"The hUis are alive," I ventured. 

"Quiet and listen!" he screams, so I did. 



■^•> 



Ky 



S.' 



<v^.5 



Tou could progress o\er the hills and for 
away if lines -16-19 didn't keep the lid on 
die pot. line 19 keeps all these rules 
from befliddlin' die computer with end- 
less loops. line 54's the piper, playin' the 
tune mice through, and "'1-85 set die 
SID, the arrow meanin' 'in the second oc- 
ta\r,' with two arrows for die high d." 
Ho!" 

"At 113 >'Ou may print the note ILst — 
much as the gcxxl people of Erin teach 
dieir young to play die whisdc to this 
ver)- diiy, by die n:inies of the notes. Eiisi- 
cr tor the non-musicians and all diat. You 
c~an leave off the REMs, or put in what- 
ever you wish." 

"Well that's all \cvx nice," says me, "but 
what 1 want to know is— WTiERE IS THE 
rX3T OF GOLD! " 

Widi this he throws the disk sk^-w^ard, 
and all I hear is "It's where the disk 
lands!" Well. I couldn't let it land on the 
ground, could I? So I dives at it and 
caught it right enough, but when 1 
turned around, he was gone. 

Don't e\'er take your e)"es off a leprc- 
chaim. n 



Before nping (his program, read "How lo Enter Programs" and "How to Use the Magazine 
hm Ptograra " The BASIC programs in this magazine arc nadahte on disk from Loadstar, 
P.O. Box J0007, StlTCTcpoit, LA •'H MMMMT, 1-800 ■8.M-2694. 



ITM 

PRINT" [CLEAR] " ' BATB 

FOR CL=54272 TO 54296:POKE CL,0 

:NEXT CL:REM CLEAR SONIC 

ADRESSES'GODO 

PRINT " (SPACES] RANDOM TRADITIONAL 

TUNES" 'BAVK 

PRINT" [SPACE6) "'BANE 

PRINT" [SPACE6] " ' BANF 

PRINT" [SPACES] " ' BANG 

PRINT" [SPACE131TYPE PREFERENCE 

: " ' BATM 

PRINT" [SPACEll] JIGS (J) OR 

REELS (R) '"BAIN 



10 GET 1$: IF I$="J"GOTO 14 ' EHRB 

11 IF I$="R"GOTO 13'DEIA 

12 GOTO 10'BCIY 

13 DIM NT(8,8): S=8 : T$="RANDOM REEL#" 
: GOTO 15'EQEJ 

14 DIM NT(8,6) :S=6:T$="RAND0M 
JIG#"'DNLI 

15 Z = Z-(-l:PRINT"[SHFT *38]" 
: PRINT Ti? ;Z'EJDK 

16 FOR B = l TO 8 'DDEF 

17 FOR N=l TO S'DDSG 

18 REM *********'BJJH 

19 KL=0:REM PREVENTS ENDLESS LOOP'CXBO 

20 KL=KL-H:1F KL = 25 THEN 16'FMLE 

21 NT{B,N)=INT(RND(0) *15-«-l) 
:IF B*N<8*S THEN GOTO 29 

:REM NOTE GENERATOR & LAST'MQWR 

22 REM ********* 'BJJC 

23 REM LINES24-26 PUT LAST NOTE IN 
TONIC CHORD'BIKK 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 93 



64 USERS ONLY/ITM 



24 IF NT(8,S>=NT(4,S)OR ABS(NT(8, 
S)-NT{4,S) ) =2 OR ABS (NT(8,S)-NTC4, 
S) ) =4 THEN 32'LAXU 

25 IF ABS (NT (3,S) -NT(4, 
S) ) =7 THEN 32'FTEK 

26 GOTO 20'BCJE 

27 REM ********* 'BJJH 

28 REM LINE 29 REPEATS OPENING 
THEME 'BAJN 

29 NT(5,N)=NT(1,N) :NT{6,N)=NT(2, 
N) 'CEGP 

30 REM *********'BJJB 

31 REM LINES 32-34 DISALLOW HUGE 
INTERVALS OTHER THAN OCTAVES 'BWFO 

32 IF ABS (NT(B,N) -NT(B, 
N-1) )=7 THEN 50'GUHJ 

33 KL=KL+1:IF KL=25 THEN 16 
:REM ANTILOCK'GVQL 

34 IF ABS (NT(B,N) -NT(B, 
M-1) ) >4 GOTO 20'GUUL 

35 RRM******************************* 

**'BIXJ 

36 REM LINES 37-43 CREATE CHORDS 20% 
OF THE TIME'BJUO 

37 IF N=S GOTO 50'DEDI 

38 IF NT(B,M)=1 GOTO 102"DLGL 

39 IF NT(B,N)=15 GOTO i07'DMOM 

40 NQ=INT(RND{0)*30+1) :0N NQ GOTO 50, 
50, 50, 50, 50, 50, 50, 50, 50 'HORM 

41 ON NQ-9 GOTO .8a,90,92,94,96,98'DUKH 

42 ON NQ-15 GOTO 50,50,50,50,50,50,50, 
50'DCMJ 

43 ON NQ-23 GOTO 50,50,50,50,50,50, 
50'DYWJ 

44 e;e[j5** ******************* ********** 

**'BIXJ 

45 REM LINES46-49 KEEP CHORD 
PROGRESSIONS IN RANGE OF 
TINWHISTLE ( &ARRAY ! ) ' BJMW 

46 IF NT(B,N)>15 THEN NT (B , N ) =NT (B , 
N)-7'FYI0 

47 IF NT(B,N)<1 THEN NT ( B, N } =NT ( B, 
N) +7'FXGP 

48 IF NT(B,N+1)<1 THEN NT {B , N+1) =NT (B , 
N+l)+7' IBUT 

49 IF NT(B,N+1)>15 THEN NT(B, 
N+1) =NT(B,N+l)-7' ICWU 

50 NEXT N'BBHB 

51 NEXT B'BBUC 

52 REM***** ************************** 
*'BHGI 

53 REM LINES 54-67 PLAY TUNE 2X'BUJK 

54 FOR TW=1 TO 2' DEDH 

55 FOR B=i TO 8'DDEI 

56 FOR N=l TO S'DDSJ 

57 ON NT(B,N)GOTO 71 , 72 , 73 , 74 , 75 ' CVNN 

58 ON NT(B,N)-5 GOTO 76,77,78,79, 
80'DWWP 

59 ON NT(B,N)-10 GOTO 81,82,83,84, 
8 5 'DXFQ 

60 POKE 54296, 15:P0KE 54277,136 
:POKE 54278, 136:POKE 54276 , 17 ' EMYL 

61 POKE 54273, HrPOKE 54272, L 



62 



63 



64 

65 
56 

67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 



:PRINT N$, 'DTFI 

IF N/S=INT(N/S)THEN 

PRINT" 

":GOTO 64'IJGS 

IF 2*N/S=INT(2*N/S)THEN 

PRINT" 

"' JIEU 

FOR QT=1 TO 15:NEXT QT 

:POKE 54276, 16'FRXM 

NEXT N'BBHH 

NEXT B'BBUI 

NEXT TW'BCTK 

GOSUB 114'BDJL 

GOTO 15'BCNL 



REM *** NOTE ASSIGNMENTS ***'BVNJ 
N$="D":H=9:L=104:GOTO 60'ENDJ 
N$="E":H=10:L=14 3:GOTO 60 ' EOWK 
N$="F#":H=ll:L=218:GOTO 60'EOHM 
N$="G":H=12:L=143:GOTO 60'EOBM 
N$="A":H=14:L=24:GOTO 60'ENWN 
N$="B":H=15:L=210:GOTO 60 ' EOTO 
N$="C#":H=17:L=195:G0T0 60'EOOQ 
N$ = "D ["] ":H = 18:L = 209:GOTO 60'EOVR 
N$="E['] ":H=21:L=31:GOTO 60'ENLS 
N$="F#["] ":H=23:L=181:GOTO 69 ' EOEK 
M$="G1^] ":H=2 5:L=30:GOTO 60'ENQL 
N$="A['] ":H=28:L=4 9:G0TO 60'ENXM 
NS="B[*] ":H=31:L=165:GOTO 60 ' EOPN 
NS = "C# ['] ":H=^3 5:L = 134:GOTO 60'EOCO 
N5="D["2] ":H=37:L=16 2:GOTO 60'EOPP 

f^gf,; ******** "BJWL 

REM 6 WAYS TO PLAY A DIATONIC 
CHORD, CHOSEN RANDOMLY AT LINE 
41'BXGA 

88 NT(B,N)=NT{B,N-1)+2'DQYR 

89 NT {B,N + 1} =NT(B,N) +2:G0T0 46'ETST 

90 NT(B,N) =NT(B,N-1) +4'DQBK 

91 NT(B,N+1} =NT(B,N)-2:G0T0 46'ETTM 

92 NT(B,N)=NT(B,N-1) +2'DQYM 

93 NT(B,N+1} =NT(B,N)-4:G0T0 46'ETVO 

94 NT(B,N)=NT(B,N-1)-2'DQA0 

95 NT(B,N+1) =NT(B,N) +4:G0T0 46'ETUQ 

96 NT(B,N)=NT(B,N-1) -2'DQAQ 

97 NT(B,N+1)=NT(B,N)-2:G0T0 46'ETTS 

98 NT{B,N) =NT(B,N-1)-4'DQCS 

99 NT(B,N+1) =NT(B,N) +2:G0T0 46'ETSO 

100 REM ********'BIWV 

101 REM SPECIAL CASES FOR "D" 
CHORDS ' BVMC 

102 IF N>(S-2)G0T0 50'EHXA 

103 QN=INT (RND(0) *10+1) 

:0N QN GOTO 50 , 50 , 50 , 50 , 50 ' HCXI 

104 ON QN-5 GOTO 5 , 50 , 50 , 105 , 106 ' DTOE 

105 NT(B,N+1) =NT(B,N) +2 
:NT(B,N+2)=NT(B,N) +4: GOTO 50'HLRM 

106 NT(B,N+1)=NT(B,N) +4 
:NT(B,N+2)=NT(B,N)+2:GOTO 50 ' HLRN 

107 IF N>(S-2)G0T0 50'EHXF 

108 QQ=INT(RND(0)*10+I) 

:0N QQ GOTO 50 , 50 , 50 , 50 , 50 ' HCDN 

109 ON QQ-5 GOTO 50 , 50 , 50 , 1 10 , 1 11 ' DT J J 

110 NT(B,N+1) =NT(B,N}-4 
:NT(B,N+2)=NT(B,N)-2:GOTO 50'HLTI 



94 MARCH '87 



64 USERS ONLY/ TM 


111 NT(B,N+l)=NT(B,N)-2 


130 


IF N/S=INT(N/S)THEN PRINT#4, 


:NT(B,N+2)=NT(B,N)-4:GOTO 50'HLTJ 
112 REM ******** 'BIWY 




11 _* — _ 




-~":GOTO 133'IMSL 


113 REM PRINTER OPTION WITH TIMER 


131 


IF 2*N/S=INT{2*N/S)THEN PRINT#4, 


LOOP'BBFH 




" [SPACE34] "' JKVL 


114 IF S=6 GOTO ll&'DFFC 


132 


IF 2*N/S=INT(2*N/S)THEN PRINT#4, 


115 IF S=8 THEN PRINT" PRINTOUT THIS 
FINE REEL?":GOTO 117'FGFM 




IT 


.."' JKTO 


116 PRINT" PRINTOUT THIS LOVELY 


133 


IF N*B=S*8 GOTO 151*FHHF 


JIG?"'BAXJ 


134 


NEXT N'BBHC 


117 PRINT"ANSWER 'Y'(YES) OR 'N'(NO)" 


135 


NEXT B'BBUD 


:FOR ZT=1 TO 1000'EION 


136 


N$="D":GOTO 128'CGXG 


118 GET P$:IF P$="N" GOTO 152'EILI 


137 


N$="E":GOTO 128'CGYH 


119 IF P$="Y" GOTO 122'DFPI 


138 


N$="F#":GOTO 128'CGLI 


120 NEXT ZT'BCWX 


139 


NS="G":GOTO 128'CGBJ 


121 GOTO 152'BDHY 


140 


N$="A":GOTO 128'CGUB 


122 OPEN 4,4:PRINT#4,CHR${14) ;T$;Z; 


141 


N$="B":GOTO 128'CGVC 


CHR$(15) 'EUBF 


142 


N$="C#":GOTO 128'CGID 


123 FOR B=l TO 8 ' DDEC 


143 


N$="D[*] ":G0TO 128'CGMF 


124 FOR N=l TO S'DDSD 


144 


N$="E["] ":GOTO 128'CGNG 


125 ON NT(B,N) GOTO 136,137,138,139, 


145 


N$="F# ["] " :GOTO 128'CGAH 


140'CBXI 


146 


NS="Gt'] ":GOTO 128'CGPI 


126 ON NT(B,N)-5 GOTO 141,14 2,143,144, 


147 


N$="A["] ":GOTO 128'CGJJ 


145'DCFK 


148 


N$ = "B['']":GOTO 128'CGKK 


127 ON NT(B,N)-10 GOTO 146,147,148, 


149 


NS = "C# [T'iGOTO 128'CGWL 


149,150'DDPL 


150 


N$="D[''2] ":GOTO 128'CGHD 


128 PRINT#4,NS, ' BFYG 


151 


CLOSE 4'BBLB 


129 IF N/S=INT(N/S)THEN PRINT#4," 


152 


RETURN 'BAQC 


[SPACE34] "'HIOQ 




END 




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64 



U0LI\0 UlNL 



V 



HY'initRYM HROWN 



CW Trainer 

for the 
Commodore 64 



M. he IntcmaticjDiil Morse Ctxlc is a spc- 
ci;il npc of language tliut radio amateur 
operators use to communicate witli peo- 
ple throughout tlic world, It is affection- 
ateh' kno^Mi as CW. an abbreviation for 
continuous wave, ^bu must pass a test in 
recei\'ing OX' in order to obtain an ama- 
teur radio license from the Federal Com- 
munications Commission, .\long with 
the code test, you must pass a multiple 
choice examination. 

This program helps you learn CW so 
that tlie C(xle-rccei\ing test will be easier. 
Wliat do you get by passing the test? You 
get the abilit)- to "talk" to other radio 
amateurs in tliis countn\ as well as any 
otlier countr\- in the ^^•()^ld! .\matcur ra- 
dio is a great deal of liin. 

Traditionally, die ctxle test for Nwicc 
license consisted oi 25 fi\e-letter groups 
sent at a rate of fi\'t \%'ords per minute. To 
piLs.s tliis code test, you were expected to 
copy accurately at least 25 ct)nsecuti\'e 
letters (cqu^il to one minute ). A \olunteer 
examiner ma)* send a fi\e-minutc plain 




Use this program to 
train for the Morse Code 
portion of the amateur 
radio license test 

English message and test you on \()ur 
comprehension of the message. A pass- 
ing grade is "'0% . 

1 highly recommend that people inter- 
ested in studying Morse Ctxle get some 
sort of text or written material so tliat tlie 
basic diflcrences between tlie ctxle for 
difiercnt letters c;ui be exmiiinetl. Two 
recommended texts are published b> tlie 
Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRI. ) 
called The RcicUo Aiiialem's License 
Akiuiuil :uid fiiiie hi the World ivith 
Ham Rciclio. 

Tliis prognuii will help tndn you for 



the Novice code test as well as the Gen- 
eral or Ad\;inced code test ( 1 ^ wpm ). 
This program is great for ;in\'one wisliing 
to learn .Morse CkxJe, ;ind will especiidly 
come in hand\- for scouts, militan- per- 
sonnel and radio technicians. 

How to Use This Program 

T\pe in the progr;uii exacdy as shown. 
VCTien the pn)gram is t>ped in correcd}' 
and run, the introductory screen is 
shown and then a menu is displa>'ed. 
Choose an item from the menu. Please 
note from the menu tliat you ma\' prac- 
tice certain groups of letters, numbers, 
puncmation, or all of them. 

You will then be prompted to choose 
the speed at which you wish to recci%e 
code. After this information is inserted, 
you ha\'e fi\'c seconds to prepare yourself 
before ccxlc pracdce acaially begins. Ini- 
tially you may v\ish to y\c\\ the letter as 
it is sho^RTi on die screen wXi&c the code 
is played through your T\' or monitor 
speaker. Later, you will want to get a 
sheet of paper and cop>- down the code 
as it is sounded ;uid check it against the 
letters on die screen after each session. 

Each practice session lasts for two 
minutes rcg:irclles.s of ctxle speed. Cixie 
sficeds of 2 to It words per minute ;u'e 
aUowcd for in die prognun. Code speeds 
faster than 1 5 words per minute produce 
unintelligible code. Q 



Before nping this program, read "How to Enter Prograais" and 'Wsv to L'se the Magariite 
Entn' Prognm " The B.\S[C prograim in ihii nugazine arc atnilablc on disk from kudsur, 
P.O. Box 3000- Shreveport, U 711304)007, 1-800-83 1-2694. 

CW Trainer 

100 DIM Nl(50) ,CW$(50) ,DUR(50,6) , 

BB{510) 'BHHC 
150 POKE 53281, 6:P0KE 53280,11 

:POKE 646,15'DXUG 
160 SP$=" "'BDCC 
200 GOSUB 60000'BFFW 
300 GOSUB 6000 'BEHX 
400 FOR L=54272 TO 54296:POKE L,0 

:NEXT L'FRCE 
500 S = 54272:POKE S-f5,15:POKE S-f24,15 

:POKE S-^6,40'HAWI 
600 POKE S-t-21,57:POKE S-i-22,100 

:POKE S+23,8'GUVI 
650 PRINT" [CLEAR, RIGHT4] 

EACH PRACTICE SESSION LASTS 

FOR"'BAQP 
660 PRINT" [RIGHT13]TW0 MINUTES ."' BAML 
700 PRINT" [D0WN3, RIGHT] 

SUGGESTED CODE SPEEDS ARE FROM 2 

TO 15"'BAJL 
710 PRINT" [RIGHT12]W0RDS PER 



800 



900 

910 

920 

950 

960 

980 

1000 

1050 

1100 




MINUTE" 'BANI 
INPUT" [D0WN3, RIGHTS] 
WHAT CODE SPEED DO YOU WISH?"; 
SPEED'BGRM 

NUMBER=INT(SPEED*10.) 'DQTJ 
IF SPEED>4 THEN 950'DJMI 
SS=4:TS=4 5:SU=2800:GOTO 1000 'EUFM 
IF SPEED>10 THEN 980'DKKM 
SS=6:TS=65:SU=1000:GOTO 1000 'EUAQ 
SS=5:TS=60:SU=1250'DPAQ 
GOSUB 3500'BEJT 
POKE 53280, 11:P0KE 53281,11 
:POKE 646,15'DYOE 
PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN3,RIGHT3] 
GET READY — CODE PRACTICE BEGINS 
IN[SPACE12]5 SECONDS" 'BAOI 
1200 FOR TT=1 TO 2000:NEXT TT ' EKNY 
1250 GOSUB 1400'BEGB 
1260 PRINT CHR$ (13) ; "WOULD YOU LIKE 

TO PRACTICE AGAIN {Y/N)"'CFGN 
1270 INPUT ANS$:IF ANS$="Y" GOTO 

300'EMAH 
1280 IF ANS$="N" GOTO 4900 'DIGG 
1290 IF ANS$<>"N" GOTO 1270'EIAI 
1310 REM'BARW 
1320 REM -- SOUND AND LETTER ROUTINE 



96 MARCH '87 



64 USERS ONLY/CW TRAINER 



— 'BAXF 6000 

1400 REM'BARW 6040 

1450 POKE 53280, 11:P0KE 53281,11 6080 

:POKE 646,12'DYLl 6085 

1500 FOR IA=1 TO NUMBER'DJPC 

1600 1B=BB(IA) iPRINT CWSdB) ;SP$; 'CVTF eagg 
1700 FOR IC=1 TO N1{IB)'DJND 
1750 GET X$:IF XS="[F71 6100 

"THEN GOSUB 6000 'FJVK 
1800 FOR ID=1 TO 7*DUR(1B, 6110 

IC) *SS/SPEED'GVCK 6120 

1900 POKE S,31:P0KE S+1,21:P0KE 5+3,8 

:POKE S + 2,0:POKE S + 4 , 65 : NEXT ' KCEO 6140 
2000 FOR ID=1 TO TS/SPEED:POKE S+4, 64 

:NEXT ID'HTID 6160 

2100 NEXT IC'BCOV 

2200 FOR IC=1 TO SU/SPEED:NEXT IC'FNLC 6180 
2300 NEXT lA'BCMX 

2350 RETURN'BAQC 6200 

2810 REM'BARD 
2820 REM SUBROUTINE TO READ DATA 6220 

TABLES 'BBAM 
2840 REM'BARG 6240 

2900 FOR 1=1 TO 42'DEHF 
13000 READ N1(I) ,CW$(I) 'BMKX 6260 

3100 FOR J = l TO Nl(I) 'DHGY 

3200 READ DUR(I, J) 'BIEY 6280 

3300 NEXT J:NEXT I'CDIY 
■ 3400 RETURN 'BAQY 
3510 REM'BARB 6290 

3520 REM RANDOM NOTE GENERATION 

SUBRUTINE'BEAL 6300 

3540 REM'BARE 

3600 FOR 1=1 TO NUMBER'DIAF 6320 

37 00 BB(I)=INT(RND(0) *NR}+SW'FOCI 
3800 NEXT I'BBCD 6340 

3900 RETURN 'BAQE 6360 

3920 REM'BARG 

4000 REM DATA FOR CHARACTERS ' BRLB 
4040 REM'BARA 6400 

4100 DATA 1,E,1,2,I,1,1,1,T,3,2,M,3,3, 

2,A,1,3,2,N,3,1'BSAF 6450 

4200 DATA 3,D,3,1,1,3,G,3,3,1,3,K,3,1, 

3,3,0,3,3,3, 3, R, 1,3, I'BYKI 6500 

4250 DATA 3 , S , 1 , 1 , 1 , 3 , U , 1 , 1 , 3 , 3 ,W, 1 , 3 , 

3,4,B,3,1,1,1'BQIL 6550 

4300 DATA 4 ,C, 3 , 1 , 3 , 1 , 4 ,F, 1 , 1 , 3 , 1 , 4 ,H, 

1,1,1,1,4,J,1,3,3,3'BWAI 6600 

4350 DATA 4, L, 1, 3, 1, 1, 4, P, 1,3,3,1,4,0, 

3,3,1,3,4,V,1,1,1,3'BWRN 6650 

4400 DATA 4, X, 3, 1, 1, 3, 4, Y, 3, 1,3,3,4,2, 

3, 3, 1,1, 5, 1,1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 5 'BBDK 6700 
4500 DATA 2,1,1,3,3,3,5,3,1,1,1,3,3,5, 

4,1,1,1,1,3,5,5,1,1,1,1,1'BDVL 67 50 
4600 DATA 5,6,3,1,1,1,1,5,7,3,3,1,1,1, 

5,3,3,3,3,1,1,5,9,3,3,3,3,1, 6 800 

5'BHIN 
4700 DATA 0,3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 6, PERIOD, 1,3,1, 6850 

3,1,3, 6 , COMMA ,3,3,1,1,3,3,6' BEPO 
4800 DATA ? MARK, 1,1, 3, 3, 1,1, 5, SLASH, 60000 

3, 1,1, 3, 1,6, GOOF, 1,1, 1,1, 1,1,1, 60010 

" ",0'BJGQ 
4900 END'BACF 60030 



REM'BARX 

REM — MENU SUBROUTINE 'BQUH 

REM'BARG 

POKE 53280, 0:POKE 53281,0 

:POKE 646,12'DWLR 

PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN, RIGHT16] MENU 

:"'BAEL 

PRINT" [DOWN, RIGHT 5] 

CHOOSE FROM AN ITEM BELOW: '"BAEH 

FOR 1=1 TO 2500:NEXT I ' EIDE 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 1. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: A,E,I,M,N,T":PRINT'CBFL 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 2. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: D,G,K,0,R" :PRINT'CBPN 

PRINT" tRIGHT2] 3. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: B,S,U,W" :PRINT'CBV0 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 4. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: C,F,H,J" :PRINT'CBJQ 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 5. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: L , P, Q , V" : PRINT ' CBAJ 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 6. PRACTICE ON 

LETTERS: X, Y,Z" :PRINT'CBYL 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 7. PRACTICE ON 

NUMBERS: 1 THROUGH 5" : PRINT 'CBWO 

PRINT" [RIGHT2] 8. PRACTICE ON 

NUMBERS: 6 THROUGH 0" : PRINT ' CBXQ 

PRINT" [RIGHT21 9. PRACTICE ON 

PUNCTUATION: [ SPACE2 ] PERIOD , " 

: PRINT' CBET 

PRINT" [RIGHT5JC0MMA, ? MARK, 

SLASH, 'GOOF ( ERROR) ": PRINT ' CBYT 
PRINT" [RIGHT] 10. RANDOM PRACTICE 
ON ALL OF THE ABOVE" 'BATL 
PRINT" [RIGHT] 11. QUIT FOR NOW" 
:PRINT'CBNI 

INPUT"WHICH DO YOU WANT";SV'BDUL 
ON SV GOTO 6400,6450,6500,6550, 
6600,6650,6700,6750,6800,6850, 
4900'CGNT 

SW=l:SX=6:NR=6:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400 'FUCK 
SW=7:SX=ll:NR=5:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400'FVAP 
SW=12:SX=15:NR=4:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 4 00'FWWL 
SW=16:SX=19:NR=4:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 4 00'FWFQ 
SW=20:SX=23:NR=4:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400'FWUM 
SW=24:SX=26:NR=3:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400'FWBR 
SW=27:SX=31:NR=5:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400"FWCN 

SW=32:SX=36:NR=5:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 4 00'FWDS 
SW=37:SX=41:NR=5:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400'FWEO 
SW=l:SX=41:NR=41:GOSUB 3500 
:GOTO 400'FWUT 

REM'BARV 

REM — SUBRUTINE TO INITIALIZE 

SCREEN AND START PROGRAM 'BTTE 

REM'BARY 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 97 



64 USERS ONLY/CW TRAINER 



61000 PRINT" [CLEAR, D0WN2, RIGHTS] 

MORSE CODE TRAINING 

PROGRAM" 'BAMA 
61020 PRINT" [D0WN2,RIGHT11] 

BY TERRY M. BROWN" ' BAFF 
61060 PRINT" [D0WN6] " ;SPC(25) ; " [BLACK, 

CMDR 19] '"CFVF 
61080 PRINT SPC(29) ;" [RVS] [RVOFF] 

"'CEKB 
61100 PRINT SPC(12) ; " [RVS,SHFT POUND, 

SPACE19,RV0FF] " 'CEFD 
61120 PRINT SPC(8) ; "[RVS, CMDR F, 

CMDR D, RVOFF, SPACE2, RVS, SPACE3, 

RVOFF, SPACE10, CMDR *,SHFT POUND] 

" 'CDWB 
61140 PRINT" [RED, CMDR POUNDS , BLACK , 

RVS, CMDR V,CMDR C, RVOFF] [RVS, 

SHFT POUND, SPACE3, CMDR *, RVOFF, 

SPACE9,RVS,SHFT POUND, CMDR *, 

RVOFF] "'BAWK 
61160 PRINT SPC{7) ; " [RVS,SPACE25, 

RVOFF] "'CD ID 
61180 PRINT" [YELLOW, DOWN, RIGHT13] 

MORSE CODE KEY"'BABG 
61200 GOSUB 2800 'BELA 
61220 DATA 4,10,11,12,1,42,16,10,7,1, 

42,2,12,42,17,13,6'BTXD 
61240 NUMBER=17'BIBF 



61250 
61260 
61230 

61300 
61400 

61500 

61600 

61650 

61700 
61800 

61900 
61950 
62000 

62100 



62200 

62300 
62400 

62500 
62600 
62700 
63000 



SPEED=7'BG0A 

FOR 1=1 TO NUMBER 'DIAD 

READ BB(I) 'BFOC 

NEXT I'BBCA 

FOR L=54272 TO 54296:POKE L,0 

:NEXT L'FRCB 

S=54272:POKE S+5,15:POKE S+24,15 

:POKE S+6,40'HAWF 

POKE S+21,57:POKE S+22,100 

:POKE S+23,8'GUVF 

PRINT" [D0WN2] ";SPC(10) ; 'CFVE 

FOR IA=1 TO NUMBER'DJPC 

IB=BB(IA) :PRINT CW$ ( IB) ; ' CRRE 

FOR IC=1 TO N1(IB)'DJND 

IF DUR(IB,IC)=0 THEN 62400'DQRK 

FOR ID=1 TO 7*DUR(IB, 

IC) *6/SPEED'GUVA 

POKE S, 31: POKE S+1,21:P0KE S+3,8 

:POKE S+2,0:POKE S+4,65 

INEXT'KCEF 

FOR 10=1 TO 50/SPEED:POKE S+4,64 

:NEXT ID'HTXC 

NEXT IC'BCOC 

FOR IC=1 TO 2500/SPEED 

;NEXT IC'FPRC 

NEXT lA'BCME 

PRINT"! ! !"'BABE 

FOR 1=1 TO 2500:NEXT I'EIDD 

RETURN 'BAQY ||,q 



ADVENTURE ROAD/MAPPING MADE SIMPLE 



Continued from pg. 80 

out is wanted for committing a murder 
while escaping from a Texas prison. In 
order to track dtmn all tlit clues mid fit 
tlic pieces of tliis puzzle togetlrer, you 
must hit the streets of tlie Big Apple. 

And those streets are realistically por- 
trayed in tlic descriptions of eacli block 
of the city. All tlic tourist attractions — ^St. 
Patrick's Cadicdnil, Times Square, the 
United Nations — are tliere, and so are 
many nuances of die Ne%\- York land- 
scape, such as obscure hack streets diat 
arc realistic-all)' laid out and resUiurants 
like Nedick's and Chock Full-o-Nuts. 
You've got to stop in for a bite rcgukirly, 
or your encrg\' level faUs too low and 
you'll wake up in die hospital. Inevitably 
tliis leads to your arrest when you're rc-c- 
ognized as Hollings, and tlie next stop is 
a Texas jail cell. To buy fotxJ you've got 
to earn money by panliandling on the 
street or washing car windshields. 

Amnesia is structured in a more linc-ar 
fiLshion than typical adventures, for it 
leads you tliniugii die same pans of the 
stor)- in a scries of e\'ents diat resemble 
tlie plot of a novel. DLsch uses diis tech- 



nique to ensure that you meet certain 
ch;iraciers at specific points in the g;uiic, 
people like die ksudmoutli Texan fude 
Dudley. In diese encounters you'll often 
read se\er.il succeeding screens of text, 
puncliing die REIT'RN key to continue. 
This also happens when you have a 
Icngdiy drc"im or a tlasliback. bodi of 
which flimi.sh hints about your past. 

1-ventuaIly it becomes evident that 
you recendy visited Texas ;uid disco\- 
ered sometliing so sensation;i! diat some- 
one is tn'ing to m;tke sure you forget it — 
;uid if )-ou don't cooperate, diey'll simple- 
kill vou. Sc\crid odier ;ilteniati\e conclu- 
sions await the perse\ering software 
sleudi. a feature I alwa\'S appreciate in an 
adventure g;tme. 

The scoring system is unusual, award- 
ing points in diree ;ire;Ls: detective, char- 
acter ;uul sur\i\-;d. Tliese detemiine your 
ovenill score and rating. 'Ilie status re- 
port also shovi^ your encrg\' level ;uid in- 
ventor}'. With a printer you can obtain 
liard copy of die giune as \ou play it. 

Two parsers ;ire on IxKud. one tor in- 
terpreting commimds abtmt na\ig;iting 
die streets and another for tiilking to peo- 



ple and dealing widi objects. Both accept 
full and multiple sentences :ind have a 
1 ,"'00-\\'ord vocabuhu^'. And for those 
who ;ire having trouble, encoded clues 
and answers are pnjvided in die miLniiiil. 
Amnesia is one of die fe\\' text adven- 
tures that I've fOLmd as absorbing to read 
as it is satisfying to play. 

More Clues 

Trinity: To get die gnomon to fit in die 
hole on die sundial, you must reverse die 
threads by first climbing die arbor ;uid 
acdvaiing the Klein lx)tde eflect. Wien 
die shadow clicks on die sundial, push 
die lever. 

Shard of Spring: Write down the names 
of everyone you meet, especially in Islan- 
dia, as well as die lyrics to any songs you 
hear. 

Rings ofZilfin: Keep walking nortli luid 
soudi between die first two towns and 
collect a big supply of muslirooms before 
going anywhere else. To get past the K- 
plants, use two parzins ;md two purlcts 
before you enter the location where diey 
are found. Q 



98 MARCH '87 



JIFFIES/VERTICAL BAR CHARTING 



Continiwcl fnim jig. 5" 

gi^■e purple (4) as the alternate color. (On a black-and-white 
TV it appears white and gray.) 

Run the program. \Xlien die chart is completed, im IXPLT 
statement prevents scrolling. Press RETUIIN luid run ag:dn to 
repeat Q 

ire t)'ping thesf programs, read "How to Enter Programs," and "How to Vx the Magazine 
itc)' Prognmn." Tlic BASIC pnigrains in Uiis magazine are n-ailable on disk fram Loadstar, 
P.O. Box 30007, Slirevcpori. U. 71 130^007. 1 -800-85 1-2694. 



Kfo! 



10 



20 



40 



50 



60 



70 



80 



90 



PRINT 
D%(72) 
INPUT" 
:IF B 
INPUT" 
:IF Q$ 
INPUT" 
: IF Q$ 
NB==36 
:I=1'H 
FOR X= 
:D%(X) 
: REM 
D% (X+1 
: REM 
IF D%( 
: REM 
NEXT'B 



Vertical Bar Charting 

CHR$(147) :DIM A%(15) , 

'DTUC 

0)FULL OR DHALF COLUMN", -B 

GOTO 40'DGRG 

COLOR {Y/N)";Q$ 

THEN DC=3'FJRI 

BOTTOM (Y/N)";Q$ 

THEN Z=1'FIWJ 

B OR DC THEN NB=72 



DUAL 

_ II y " 

ZERO 
-"N" 

I=2:IF 

SIK 

1 TO NB STEP 2 

= (40*RND(1)+1)*Z 

BOTTOM 'KCEO 

)=D% (X)+99*RND(1) +8 

TOP'HVIM 

X+1) >D% (0) THEN D% (0) 

HIGHEST TOP'HILQ 

AEF 



=D%(x+i; 



100 DATA 97,126,97, 123'BNWX 

110 FOR X=0 TO 3:READ A%(X):NEXT 

:R=2'GNQC 
120 IF 8=0 THEN FOR X=0 TO 15 

:READ A% (X) :NEXT:R=8' JQDG 
130 DATA 224,228,239,249,226,120,119, 

99,224,100,111,121,98,248,247, 

227'BLNK 
140 HV=R*20:S%=1+D%(0)/HV:IV=S%*R'HWLJ 
150 PRINT CHR$ (147) "DEMO CHART" 

:FOR X=l TO 40 : L$ = L$-i-CHR$ {164} 

:NEXT' JVOM 
160 FOR X=20 TO STEP-1 

:X$=MID$ (STR$ (IV*X) ,2) ' JRWK 
170 P$=X5 + LEFT$ (L$,40-LEN (X$) ) 

iPRINT P$; :NEXT:X%=1' lYTM 
180 FOR X=l TO NB STEP 2 :B%=D% (X) /S% 

:T%=D% (X+l)/S%' JBDO 
190 E=B%-(INT(B%/R)*R> :GOSUB 240 

:E=R'HSNM 
200 B%=B%+R:IF B%<T% THEN GOSUB 240 

:GOTO 200'HRRD 
210 B%=T%:E=T%-(INT(T%/R) *R) 

:IF E THEN E = E-l-R:GOSUB 240'LAYJ 
220 IF DC THEN CC=ABS (CC-1 ) ' FJOD 
230 X%=X%+I:NEXT:INPUT Q9:END'FKWE 
240 Y%=B%/R:SA=lB66-(y%*40)+X% 

:POKE SA,A% (E) :POKE SA+54272 ,DC+CC 

: RETURN 'LSFQ |„p. 



YET ITCOSTS SO MUCH LESS. 



3 riLE: HOUSEHOLD BUDGET 

i! 

YEAR: 1985 

<\ mcore source sm 



HUSBANDS NET PAV 
IIFES HET PAV 
lET DISABILITV 

nV DEHOS/IHTEREST 
OTHER 



TOTAL KOHTHL' 



1580 2580 

250 2Se 

19tS 2126 

134 134 



Allow us to introduce the most 
powerful electronic spreadsheet 
in the Commodore world. 

Mnltiplan': 

This is the same intensely sim- 
ple, staggeringly brilliant pro- 
gram over a million Apple and 
IBM owners count on. 



\ 



And now it will count for you, 
on any 64 or 128. 

Ironically, however, though we 
recently lowered the price of 
Multiplan, we actually 
increased its capabilities. 

The enhanced version not 
only takes full advantage of the 
128's expanded memory and 80 
column screen. 

Not only includes a Quicksiart 
instruction manual. 

And not only comes with 10 
ready-to-go templates. 

But it is the fastest load- 
ing spreadsheet 



MuUipkti latth 
beaidtfull} ifH 
a btidgel 




you can buy Which means in 
mere seconds you can 
check your checkbook 
Take stock of your 
stocks. Or calculate 
your risks. 

You can plan, bud- 
get, analyze, 
question, ponder, 
revise, estimate 
and forecast. 

Just by doing little 
more than pressing a few keys. 
In fact, there really isn't any 
kind of hardcore number crunch- 
' . ing you can't do faster and 
• easier with Multiplan at 
• your control. 

Whether you're managing 
' a family of 4. A business of 
50. Or a nation Cj^^V^ 
\ of250mimon.^'^'^ 



MuUiphtt and 
Microsoft ati; ivj^iend 
tfxjdemiuks of 
Microso/i Corp. 



128 USERS ONLY 



B^' MARK lORDAN 



TUG 

foi' the 
Commodore 128 



xVs its name implies, TUG is a game of 
strength. Based on tlic tiig-of-wtir con- 
cept, diis one- or rwo-player ^vmii yields 
many wins to the miglity. But in tliis case, 
tlic strcngtli is not ajiplied to die joystick, 
(Wlio \\';uits a brtjken joystick hiuidle, 
right?) Instead, you must exercise 
strength of will — will[X)wer. 

TUG is also a game of reflex. The 
quicker-mo\ing may Ix- alile to whip tlie 
stronger-willed, IIowe\er. reflexes can 
hurt \ou — ^TLG is ;ilso a g:ime of wit. 

-Mostly, TUG is a game diat demon- 
strates just how e-asily a game widi an at- 
tractive pla)' field and effecti\c pla\' ac- 
tion can be written on die Ciommodore 
128, To match the effects on a 6-i, )0u 
■would have to re-sort to machine lan- 
guage and several reference b(X5k.s, 

Begin by taping it in, Save it as ;i]wa)'s 
before running it die first time. Since tlie 
prognun is written in BASIC,, it's unlikely 
you would crash it witli had data or odier 
errors, but it's not im['K>ssil>lc. Ikwe%cr. 
one of tile many subtle beauties of the 
1 28 is that }ou can easily reci)y-er firom 
most crashes. How? Just hold down tlie 
RUN/STOP key and press die reset but- 
ton. VJTien tile reset has Ixen done, you'll 
find yourself in die 128's built-in ma- 
chine language monitor. Type X and 
press RETURN, and you'll Ix- back in BA- 
SIC with the pn)gr.uii intact. 

When you nin die progr;im, you have 
to put up with a mild w;ut while the 
screen designs itself ^'ou can speed 
tilings up coasiderabK' by adding a FAST 
command at die ver\- Ixrginning of the 
prognun (s;iy, line "S ), 

The game starts ^^'idl Clark and Clara 
our Xs\'o heros, being intrtKluced, If )our 



For this ttig-of- 

war game you 

need more than 

strength — -you 

need reflex and 

willpower. 




joystick is in port 1. you v\t1I maneuver 
Clark. Othcnvise. Clara is \our sprite. 
Now it's pull-time. Clark and Clani are 
squared oft' in a be-autifiil mountiiin set- 
ting. Connecting them is a 1-i-i -pixel k)ng 
rope, stretched taut. Between diem is a 
black seetliing pit of who-ktiows-what. 

Abo\'e die pit is a di;unoiid, l*ay atten- 
tion to diis diiuiiond, A black b;Jl will ap- 
pear at one of the pxiinLs of this diiunond. 
If it Ls on Uic left point, quickly jxisli \()ur 
joystick to the left. If you push \-our joys- 
tick to the left before your opponent 
docs, yoiir sprite ( let's s;iy, Clark ) will pu il 
Clara a pLxel ckiscr to dtxim. 

Tliere is one thing. iKJwever you must 
watch for. The ball may not always be 
black — it may lie red. If it is, tlien tU)n"t 
push left. Tlie first one who docs will 
lose ground iastead of gaining it. If no 
one pushes left after a moment, die b;ill 
will change. It takes approximately 50 
pixels before Clark or Clara get dinjwn 
in die pit. 

It's clear to see liow '11 'Ct is a game of 
reflex ;uid wit, but how about strengUi? 
Tlie luiswer to diat will become app;irent 
in \our first rc;il tiis.sle. Fiiirv pixels is a 



Before hping these programs, fcaj "How w Enter Prograns," and "How to L'sc [he Magizinc 4 
Enuy' Prograni." Tlic B.\5tC prognrnt in [hit magazine arc a^'iilablc on disk lioni Loidsur. 
P.O.Box30(X)"',Shrevcpon,lA"IH0000''. 1-800-83I-2694. gg 

TUG 

10 GRAPHIC 3,1'BDJX 60 

20 FOR T=3584 TO 3927:READ A$ 

:POKE T,DEC(A$) :NEXT*HUQG 70 

30 FOR T=3928 TO 4032:POKE T,0 

INEXT'FOHF 80 



long way. particularly when you coasider 
that sometimes \'oiir opponent will pull 
you toward die pit, c;uicelling some of 
your \ictories. 

Willpower Ls the key — and lots of it. If 
you get distracted or frustrated because 
it's Uiking so long to yiuik ol' (;iara into 
the cesspool, you ma\' fintl Chira viuiking 
you in that direction. If you want faster 
games, change N = 1 in line -J8() to N = 2 
(or 3, 4. etc.). Tills way each tug \\ ill pull 
a litde ferther. 

Oh yes, I did s;i\- diat TLG ciui be 
played solitaire, \Khen the open screen 
comes up. just ch(K)se die one-player op- 
tion and le\-el ( 1 ■\ ). ke\el ^ is best for be- 
ginners, ie\el 1 for die masochistic t)pe. 

Winning isn't everything — you need 
to win big. In TL'G diat means quick. 
There's a timer diat will display how long 
it took you to dump your opponent ;tfter 
each round, 

\\ft been pn)gnunming Commodore 
computers tor three ye;«rs now. Creating 
TU;G v-\'as die best task I lia\e yet utKk-r- 
taken, Tlie (!omniodore 128, widi its su- 
perb graphics luid wonderftil BASICS 7.0, 
is one mean machine. [9 



FOR T=3968 TO 3975:READ A$ 

:POKE T,DEC(A$) rNEXT'HUAI 

COLOR 4, 3:C0L0R 0,8:COLOR 5,1 

:COLOR 1,1 :COLOR 2,6'FTTJ 

CIRCLE 2,10,10,2,3:PAINT 2,10,10,1 

:SSHAPE CR5,8,7,12,13:SCNCLR'ELOt>1 

COLOR 3,11:B0X 3,70,120,88,137,45,1 

:C0L0R 3,3'DEEL 

COLOR 2,8:CIRCLE 2,20,10,5,7 



100 f^ARCH'87 



1 28 USERS ONLY/TUG 



ei,14,l:C0L0R 2,6'EEMN 
TO 10,10 TO 35, 
TO 70,22 TO 100, 
8 TO 140,9 TO 159,20'JWOU 
35 TO 35,30 TO 80, 
,23 TO 159,25 
5,27,1'GMEG 
:C=2:G0SUB 120:X=X-2 
1:G0SUB 120:GOTO 150'LIVK 
Y TO X+20,Y-10 
+10,Y-5 TO X+10,Y+20'KDIK 

28, Y TO X+28, 
+38,Y+10 TO X+38, 



:PAINT 2,2 

90 DRAW 1,0,3 

25 TO 55,8 

2 TO 121,1 

100 DRAW 1,0, 

27 TO 125 

: PAINT 1, 

110 X=50:y=80 
:Y=Y-2:C= 

120 DRAW C,X, 
:DRAW C,X 

130 DRAW C,X+ 
Y+20 TO X 
Y-10'LDPM 

140 DRAW C,X+60,Y-10 TO X+50 , 
Y TO X+50,Y+24 TO X+60, 
Y+10 TO X+60,y+5 TO X+55 , Y+5 ' RPCT 

145 RETURN 'BAQE 

150 DRAW 3,0,168 TO 66,168 

•.DRAW 3,92,168 TO 159,168'EETI 
160 CIRCLE 3,79,168,13,30,90,270 

:DRAW 1,68,175 TO 91,175'DLBK 
170 PAINT 3,1,171,1:PAINT 3,1,1,1 

-.PAINT 1,71, 177, 1'DDYJ 
180 CD$="[HOME] ":FOR T=l TO 25 

:CD$=CD$+" [DOWN J ":NEXT'HQML 
190 X (1)=201:Y(1)=174:X(2)=171 

:Y(2)=191:X(3)=142:Y(3)=175 

:X{4}=171'HFHU 
200Y(4)=158:J(3)=1:J{5)=2:J(7)=3 

:J(1)=4 'FGCF 
210 R0PE=112:E$=CHR$ (27) :L9=CHR$(13) 

:L$(1) ="CLARK":L${3)="CLARA" 

:W$ (1)="CLARA" :W$ (3) ="CLARK"' JULS 
220 PRINT E5"M"'BCEY 
230 SPRCOLOR 6,1:SPRSAV 5,TR$ 

rSPRSAV 6,8:SPRSAV 7,6 

rSPRSAV 7,5'FBXI 
240 FOR T=l TO 17:READ X,Y 

:GSHAPE TR$ , X , Y , 4 : NEXT ' GTJI 
250 SLOW'BBKC 
260 A$="V1O1CO0AO1HDO0.AQB" 

:B$="01HCFEDQ" : PL$=A$+A$+B$+LEFT$ 

(A$,17) 'HWXS 
270 GRAPHIC 0:MOVSPR 1,140,98 

:MOVSPR 3,212,98'DVTJ 
280 PRINT" [CLEAR, BLACK, D0WN3] " ," 

[SPACE2]MEET THE TUGGERS:" 

:FOR T=l TO 700 : NEXT ' FIBO 
290 SPRITE 1,1,1,1:SPRITE 3,1,1,1'CRNJ 
300 PRINT LEFT? {CD$,10) ," [SPACE3] 

CLARK [SPACE21& [SPACE2] CLARA"" CJVD 
310 PRINT" [D0WN2]CLARK WILL USE PORT 

2, CLARA HAS PORT l."'BARI 
3 20 VOL 15: PLAY PL$'CHKC 
330 PRINT"PRESS [WHITE ] B [BLACK] 
TO BEGIN, 1 TO PLAY 

SOLITAIRE. '"BAVL 
340 LV=16:NP=0'CIQE 

350 GET KEY A?:IF A$="B"THEN 420'FIPH 
360 IF A$<>"l"THEbJ 350'EFVG 



370 NP=1:PRINT" [DOWNJLEVEL (1 - 

3) "'CEPJ 
380 GET KEY A$ : A=VAL ( A$) : LV=A+3 

:IF A<1 OR A>10 THEN PRINT" [BELL] 

";:GOTO 380'NYGT 
390 PRINT" [DOWN] PRESS 1 TO CONTROL 

CLARA, 2 FOR CLARK. "'BAJQ 
400 GET KEY A$ : A=VAL ( A$) : WP=A 

:IF A<1 OR A>2 THEN PRINT" [BELL] " ; 

:GOTO 400'MWSL 
410 IF WP=2 THEN WP=3:ELSE WP=1'GKAF 
420 GRAPHIC 3:SPRITE 2,1,7,1 

:SPRITE 4,1,3,1'DTRG 
430 SPRITE 5,1,10,0,1:SPRITE 6,1,10,0, 

IrSPRITE 7,1,10,0,1'DKOK 
440 MOVSPR l,93,176:MOVSPR 2,98,197 

:MOVSPR 3,252,176:MOVSPR 4,252, 

197 'EQQN 
450 MOVSPR 5,RO,204:MOVSPR 6,RO+48,204 

ZMOVSPR 7,RO+96,204'FIDN 
460 REM — MAIN PROGRAM LOOP'BRUJ 
470 TI$="000000":VOL 15'CGUJ 
480 DO:Z=0:R=INT (RND(l) *4)+l:C$=CR$ 

:C0=1:N=1'KATS 
490 CC=RND{1):IF CC<.2 THEN C0=3 

:N=-1' IQHQ 
500 MOVSPR 8,X(R) ,Y(R) :SPR1TE 8,1, 

CO'CUDF 
510 Z=Z+1:IF Z=LV THEN BEGIN 

: IF NP = 1 THEN X=N:S=WP 

:G0T0 560'MWYN 
520 BEND: IF C0=3 THEN LOOP ' FFEF 
530 J1=J0Y(1)AND 127 : J2= JOY (2 ) AND 

127'GRBJ 
540 IF J(J1)=R THEN X=N:S=3 

:G0T0 560'GPPK 
550 IF J{J2)=R THEN X=-N:S=1 

:ELSE 510'HPAM 
560 SPRITE 8,0,CO:FOR T=l TO 7 

:MOVSPR T,+X,+0:NEXT' ITPO 
570 MOVSPR S,+0,+l'DGYJ 
580 FOR T=l TO 50:NEXT'EFYK 
590 MOVSPR S,+0,-l'DGAL 
600 SOUND 1,2500, 5 , , , 58 , ' BPVD 
610 B=BUMP(2):IF B >0 AND B<8 THEN 

EXIT'IKJI 
620 LOOP'BAKC 

630 REM 'BFLE 

640 VOL 4:S0UND 1,9000,100,1,2000,55, 

2,880'CDRL 
650 IF RSPPOS (1,0) >135 THEN 670'EMBJ 
660 X=-1:Y=1:W=3:V=0:U=175:GOSUB 740 

:X=0:V=1:U=250:GOSUB 740 

:GOTO 68 0'MOGX 
670 X=l: Y=1:W=1:V=0:U=175:GOSUB 740 

:X=0:V=1:U=250:GOSUB 740'KKWV 
680 GRAPHIC 4,0,22:T$=MID$(TI$,4,1)+" 

:"+MID$ (TI$,5) 'GAXR 
690 PRINT LEFT$ (CD$,24)" [SPACE2i 

NOT BAD, "W$(W)", BUT IT TOOK YOU 

"T$'CPSU 
700 PRINT" [SPACE4] TO WHIP "L$(W)". 



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Continued from pg. 6l) 

1250 PRINT" [RVS] "TN$EX$"BGYC 
1260 FOR 1=1 TO 150:NEXT 

:REM TIME DELAY 'FQKI 
1270 PRINT" [DOWN, SPACE6,SHFT PJRESS 

[RVS,SHFT R,SHFT E,SHFT T,SHFT U, 

SHFT R,SHFT N , RVOFF] " ' BANL 
1280 GET AS: IF A$=CHR$ (13) THEN 

1300'FNAI 
1290 PRINT" [RVOFF] "TN$EX$ 

:FOR 1=1 TO 150:NEXT 

:GOTO 1250'GSBM 
1300 INPUT" [HOME, D0WN7, SHFT E]NTER 

[RVS,L. BLUE, SHFT EJXTERNAL 

[RVOFF, WHITE] [SHFT D] RIVE # "; 

EN'BDDG 
1310 IF EN>13 OR EN<8 THEN 1300'FLDC 
1320 IF(EN=IN)THEN 1300'DKJC 
1330 PRINT#1,"M-W"CHR$(119)CHR${0) 

CHR$(2)CHR$ (EN+32)CHR$ (EN+64) 

'lAJK 
1340 CLOSE 1:0PEN 1,14,15'CJDC 
1350 PRINT#1,"M-W"CHR$ (119)CHR$(0) 

CHR$ (2)CHR$ (IN+32)CHR$ (Ibl+64) 

' lARM 
1360 CLOSE 1:0PEN 1 , IN , 15 , " I " ' CKPF 
1370 PRINT" [DOWNS, SHFT A] LL [SHFT D] 

ONE"'BAUH 
1380 END'BACE END 



128 USERS ONLY/TUG 



[SPACE2]TRY AGAIN? [SPACE3 j 

Y/N"'BFRJ 
710 VOL 15: TEMPO 20: PLAY PL$'DLTG 
720 GET KEY A$:IF A$="Y"THEN GRAPHIC 

0,1:GOTO 330:ELSE IF A$<>"N"THEN 

720'MSUP 
730 GRAPHIC 0,1:END'CELG 
740 DOrMOVSPR W, +X, +Y : MOVSPR W+l,+X, 

+Y' IPTO 
750 LOOP UNTIL RSPPOS (W,V)=U 

: RETURN 'FIEL 

760 REM 'BFLI 

770 DATA 07,FE,E0,1B,FF,F0,3D,FF'BXYN 
780 DATA E0,7F,00,40,FF,FF,7C,FE'BXMO 
790 DATA 81,C2,E6,89,52,D6,81,22'BXVP 
800 DATA D6,81,12,D0,C3,0C,E0,7E'BXYH 
810 DATA 78,F8,00,20,F0,00,20,70'BXFI 
820 DATA 00,10,20,07,E0,18,00,20'BXYI 
830 DATA 0C,00,40,04,40,40,06,3F'BXXJ 
840 DATA 80,04,10,00,06,10,00,00'BXCK 
850 DATA FE,00,00,EB,00,00,DF,80'BXIM 
860 DATA 00,FF,C0,00,DF,E0,00,EF'BXUN 
870 DATA F0,00,FB,FF,DE,FE,FF,DE'BXBO 
880 DATA FF,3F,DC,FF,00,00,60,C0'BXDP 
890 DATA 00,38,30,00,1E,0C,00,0F'BXEQ 
900 DATA 82,00,07,E1,00,07,A1,00'BXVH 
910 DATA 0F,21,00,0F,21,00,1F,1F'BXXJ 
920 DATA E0,1F,DF,F0,1F,DF,F0,00'BXVK 
930 DATA 00,00,00,07,DE,00,1F,7F'BXBL 
940 DATA C0,3D,FF,F0,78,FF,F8,70'BXPM 
950 DATA 1F,F8,39,C7,FC,6B,60,F4 'BXON 
960 DATA 4E,3F,FC,4E,20,3C,6B,60'BXVO 
970 DATA 7C,33,C0,FC,20,00,FC,1C'BXGP 
980 DATA 02,EC,00,05,D8,0F,0B,F8'BXVQ 
990 DATA 00,13,7C,08,63,F8,07,a3'BXWR 
1000 DATA BC,00,41,D6,00,42,FB,00'BXPX 
1010 DATA 00,C7,00,01,58,C0,02,20'BXUX 
1020 DATA 20,04,02,10,04,41,08,02'BXKY 
1030 DATA 20,88,0D,0F,08,33,F0,30'BXAB 
1040 DATA 44,C0,C0,3C,7F,00,03,FF'BXUC 
1050 DATA 80,00,FF,80,01,FF,C0,03'BXDD 
1060 DATA FF,C0,00,88,80,01,14,80'BXCE 
1070 DATA 01,24,40,02,22,40,04,42'BXNE 
1080 DATA 40,0F,87,C0,3F,9F,C0,00'BXLG 
1090 DATA 00,08,00,00,28,00,00,08'BXIG 
1100 DATA 80,00,A8,a0,02,2E,80,02'BXDY 
1110 DATA AE,00,00,2A,20,02,0A,A0'BXWA 
1120 DATA 02,BE,80,00,2E,20,08,AF'BXWB 
1130 DATA A0,0A,2A,80,02,AA,08,20'BXIC 
1140 DATA 2E,88,2A,AA,A8,08,8E,20'BXHD 
1150 DATA 02,AB,88,08,AA,A8,02,AA'BXHE 
1160 DATA 80,00,0F,00,00,0F,00,00'BXJE 
1170 DATA 00,3E,00,00,FF,80,01,C9'BXGG 
1180 DATA C0,01,FF,C0,01,FF,C0,01'BXYH 
1190 DATA C1,C0,00,FF,80,00,3E,00'BXQI 
1200 DATA DB,6D,B6,6D,B6,DB,00,00'BXCA 
1210 DATA 2,26, 14,32, 20,28, 30,38, 

46,40, 65,25, 76,31, 92,42'BVLF 
1220 DATA 104,27, 114,24, 126,32, 139, 

30, 110,46, 116,54, 130,62'BXAG 
1230 DATA 149,58, 155,70'BNUB 

iND 



102 MARCH '87 



TAKE THE a-lINK CHAILENGE! 

IF YOU WIN, GET THREE PRIZES! 

• A MODEM 

• A FOUR-MONTH Q-LINK MEMBERSHIP 

• LUCASFILM'SIMJrmr SOFTWARE 



Complete the Challenge of the Month correeth- and yoii will be 
eligible to win a great prize package! 

liaeli month. 20 intlividiials will he ehosen I'roni the pool of 
torrett (Challenge entries and the winners \\ ill receive a prize 
package that includes all ihi.s! 

• A free Commodore 300-baud modem (Model 1600). 
With this modem, you'll he able to hook up your Commodore 
64 or 128 to a telephone and access QuantumLink, tile official 
on-line ser\'icc for Commodore owners. 

• A free QuantumLink four-month membership. 
QuantimiLink membership normally costs just S9.9t per 
month, and includes unlimited use- of a base tier of services 
and one free lioLir of access each month to special I'kis 



scr\'ices. As a Challenge winner, you'll get QuantumLink 
software and your first four months membership free! 

• A free copy of Lucasfilm's Habitat software. 

Habitat is the new niLilti-playergame that utilizes the 
QuantumLink network to interconnect thousands of 
Commodore owners from across the country. Participants can 
quest for hidden treasure, investigate intriguing mysteries, 
and participate in the ongoing drama of this innovative and 
exciting graphic adventure. 

Consolation Prize! 

If the Challenge entry you submit is correct, but your name is 
not chosen from the pool of correct entries, you will be sent a 
Q-Link .software kit for l-RF.E! 



HERE'S HOW TO ENTER! 

Simply complete the C^hallenge of the .Month and send it with 
this coupon to Quantum (loniputer Services. 8620 Westwood 
Center Drive. N'ieniia, VA 11 1 HO. Aun; Challenge of the Month 
# (fill in the correct Challenge of the .Montii number) 



NAME. 



ADDRESS . 
CITY 



-STATt^ 



_ZIP CODE . 



PHONE NUMBER L 



YOU MUST ANSWER BOTH QUESTIONS TO VSTN: 

Arc you currently a member of QuantumLink? 

□ '^es — if I win. extend my membership for four months? 

[J iNo — if I win, send me the Q-Link software and free four- 
month membership. If 1 gel the Challenge correct but 
don't win, send me a free Q-Link software kit as a 
consolation prize. 

Do you currently own a modem? 

□ Yes — if I win, send me a sub.stitute prize. 
n No — il' 1 win. send me the modem. 



CHALLENGE OF THE MONTH #4 



Two pairs of letters in each line of this puzzle are 
already filled in. To solve the puzzle, insert the 
remaining pairs of letters into the blank squares. 
Do not rearrange any letters, and put only one 
letter in each box. When you are finished you will 
have spelled 6 eight-letter computer terms 
(reading across). Each pair of letters is used only 
once, so you may cross them off as you use 
them. 



MP WH WA AD SE EB 
EM BA IN TI FT CK 



D 









L 









J 





Y 


S 










S 













R 


E 


c 









U 


T 






D 


A 


T 


A 










T 


E 










A 


L 



A 
i 

J 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 103 



1 28 USERS ONLY 



Super Sweep 
128 



A liLTc :irc nuiiKToiis t\pcs of comput- 
ers :uul openiting s\stL-ins. most of which 
arc not compatible. Ihing to share pro- 
gr;im ;(nd cLttii tiles lx-t\\een incompati- 
ble computers c;ui be a major headache 
when you work witli se\enil machines. I 
personally own a MC 20 ;uid a Commo- 
dore 1 28. 1 ;iLso use a Commodore PC- 10 
MS-1X)S computer ;uitl a l^idio .Shack 
TR.S-8() CPM-b:Lsed machine in a bnsi- 
ncs,s en\ironmcnit. 

Iliesc machines are incompatible witli 
each odier. \et I reguhirly share (.lata files. 
and sometimes even jinignun liles. be- 
tween all four machines. For e.\ample. 
WotrlStar text flics written on tJie IBM- 
K'. will work perfectly witli CJ'M Vion/ 
Slarim tlie 1 28 or Tlis-HO, Viith A.S(;;il lo 
PFI^CIl ckiracter conwrsion. i!ie text 
files will also work witli most word pro- 
cessors, such as PcipL'iiiip antl Pockcl 
Wiilei: on die 128 iUuL/or VIC H). 

Ilie s;ime goes for spreadsheet nuxlels 
from Miiltiplau ;md C'dkSlcir :uul data- 
base files from dBase II. In fact, you can 
intcirhangc data filc-s for any pn)gnini 
niniiing under MS-DOS widi an aniilo- 
gous CP/M version, and il it exists, a 128 
\1C 20 vcrsioa 

There are several ways to exch;mge 
files between computers. One metli(K.I 
involves a direct connection between 
the computers \ia a null mcxlem cable or 
otlier data link. 'Iliis nietJiod must have 
the two machines close enougli together 
that they can Ik' connected b\- a wire. 
The second method is ;in extension of 
die first: die wire is rcplacet! b)' tv\o mo- 
dems ;ind a telephone line, tor diis to 
work, )'Oii generally need cither a person 
at l"K)di ends to control die tnui.sfer or a 
"smart" tcrmin;il program at one end diat 
can be controlled ft'om die other end, 
Bodi mednKLs suffer fn)m the drawback 
diat diey rec|uire two machines. 

The third method, which is much 
more versatile, is to transfer die files on 
an intermediate storage medium such as 
a floppy disk, .No connections or wires 
are required ;ind yoii only need to use- 
one machine at a time to do die inuisfer. 
Ttie drawback of diis mediod is diat you 
need to find a disk tbmiat tliat c;ui Ix' un- 




Transfer program and data flies betiveen the 
128 aiul the IBM-PC 



derstood by both machines, liifortu- 
iiateK-, tliere arc as nijui)- different disk 
liirmats :ls dierc ;ire computers. 

If you c;in get one of your coniputei^s 
to read ;uid write die disk fomiat of the 
odier, you have solved die problem. With 
diat in mind. 1 wrote a short pn)gr;uii 
c;illed Su]icr Sweep 128 which :dlows 
die I ^'^ I disk dri\c to read and write in 
direc basic fomiats: noiTii;d (;t)mmodore 
DOS t>pe Si:g files, 128 CP.\1 :uid .MS- 
IX>S. 'Ilie prognuii :ilso does .-VSCII <> 
PIiTSCll coii\ersions of te.xt files, if de- 
sired. In order tti better undcrsuuid how- 
die program works, a simple description 
of die structure of CIVM ;md .MS-DOS 
disks is in order 

Disk Compatibility 

Tile 1 28 Ls a remark;iblc machine, es- 
|X'cially when connected to a l^^l disk 
drive, 'lliis combination can read and 
write just alXHit ;uiy disk fomiai a\ailable 
in 5 1/4-inch size. Many diflcrent formats 
such as Epson, KayPro, Osborne and 
CP/M-86 are supjxjfted automaticalK- by 
CP.\1 mode em die 128. Ihe 128 I'S'l 
eomlx) can ;d.so read and write .\iS-IX)S 
disks as well as man)' odier fonnats. Al- 
diou^i this must be perfonned under 
.software control, it Ls alativeh' simple 
once \'ou figure out die logical staictiirt- 
of die foreign disk. 

Se%eail factors determine the conipad- 
hility of disks among the various ma- 



chines. 'Ilie first. ;uid ix-rhaps die most 
important, is die physicsil stnicture of the 
(.lisk. ObvitHisly >ou c;uinot read ;ui 8- 
inch disk on a dri\e designed for "S''!- 
inch tlisks; ditto for 3' .;-inch micro flop- 
]-»ic.s. If die disk fits into die drive, the 
next pn)blem is die recording medi(xl 
u.sed to store die data on die disk. 

lliea- are ni;uiy recording mediods, 
but ag:tin, most ;ire incompatible widi 
each odier. One of die most common Ls 
MFM (nnxJified (or maximum) frequen- 
cy modulation) used b\ .MS-DOS, TRS- 
EX5S ;ind most (!P'M fomiats. Commo- 
doR- uses a difierent technique c;dlcd 
CiCR ( for group coded recording ) t()r the 
15'il/l571/-iO-K) ;uid most of its odier 
disk drives. Tlie ComnxKiore \^~\ drive 
Ls probably die only drive on die market 
which contains hardware support for 
liodi recording medxKLs. 

'Mie third iirohlem is the logical orga- 
nization of the Llisk; how die files aiv 
.stored, die location and structure of die 
directon,; ;ind so on. lliis diird aspect is 
the key for interchanging disks lx-t\\'een 
different coni]iuters with physically 
compatible disk dri\e-s. Hie logical org;i- 
nizjttion of virtu;illy all micnxomputer 
disk fonnats is softw:ire-controlled. 

In iin)st computers, the acnnil oper- 
ation of die tlisk storage system is hidden 
ft-oni die u.ser by a liigli le\el screen, usu- 
ally called a disk operating system or 
IX)S, Ilie DOS is a set of disk control 



104 MARCH '87 



128 USERS ONLY 



routines indirectly called by the user 
which tell the disk drive where ;ind ho\^" 
to access die d:it;i. Ihe DOS also keeps 
track of general housekeeping of the 
disk, such ;ls milking sure that lile-s lIoh'c 
oserwrite each odier To change die logi- 
cal oi^;uiization of tiie disk, all you need 
to do is write your own custom DOS 
which emulates die format of die foreign 
disk you are tr\ing to access. 

Fortunately, most DOS's. including 
Commodore DOS. c;i'/.M :uid .MS-Dt)S, 
ha\'c comm:inds which allow you to nui- 
donily access indi\idu;il tracks and sec- 
tors on a disk. Tlie irick to format con- 
version is to use die built-in DOS coni- 
m;uids ol'one format (usiiidly die more 
c(miplicated one) to read or write an- 
odicr ( usiuilly tlie simpler one) sector by 
sector Of course, this re(.|ulres detailed 
knowledge of die logical structure of the 
foreign disk f()rniat. 

Tlie structure of Commodore DOS 
disks should be fairly fiiniUiar to most 
1 28 users, Since Super Sweep 1 28 runs 
on the I 28 in native mode, detailed 
knowledge of ComiiKKlore Dt)S is not 
required because iLs liinctions :tre imple- 
mented auioiiiatic;illy. [Iowc\xt. tletailed 
infomiation c;in be found in the user's 
niiuiual for the IS-il or 1571 dri\e, ifde- 
siretl. On die odier li;md, CIVM and ,V1S- 
I )C)S disk ,stnictiirc-s may not be ;ls famil iar. 

128 CP/M 

Single-sided CP/M disks, 1 28 included, 
;ire iisu:illy di\ided into IK byte :irc"iLS 
c;illed bk)cks or :illocation units (.U'V). 
'llie Al' is die smallest space on die di.sk 
that a file clui occupy. I'or example, even 
if a file coiit;iincd onK' cxie b\te, die odi- 
er 1,023 h\tes in its AL' caiinot be used 
by anodier file. Ilie i 28 single-siiled tlisk 
contiuns 170 All's, numbered to 169. 
AUs :uid I contain die dirccton', while 
the rest ;ire u.sed for dat:i storage. Kach 
AU is sulxlivided into 8 "records" of 128 
bytes each. Ilie recortl is die standard 
unit for finding or storing data on a disk 
witliin a CIV.VI file, As files grow, tliey 
contain more records, ;ind conscc)uently 
more blocks are alkxrated tmtn die list of 
cnipt)' blocks. 

.Since die st;uid;ird (;omniodore (i<:R 
sector size u.sed on die 1541 and 1571 
disk dri\-es is 256 b>-tes. each CP/,\1 AIj is 
comprised of four ]iliysic;ii sectors on 
die disk. 'Ilie actual strLicuire of the 128 
CP/.\1 disk is die s:ime as a st:uidaixl (;oni- 
mcxlore 1X)S disk in terms of number of 
sectors per track and number of tracks 



[XT disk. The order in which the sectors 
are filled, howc\er is quite different. It is 
e-.LSie.st to vLsuall/.e die filling order if you 
diink of each track ;ls a d:irtboard widi 
die segments numbered in coasecuti\e 
order ironi up la die maximum num- 
ber of sectors on diat track, llie sectors 
:ire filled starting at :md jumping 5 each 
time to die next; diat is 0, 5, 10, 15, ;uid 
so on. W'hen you complete die circle 
once, you should have gone jiast die 0. 

For 2 1 sectors per track, you will end 
up at sector 4. Tlie cycle dien repeats: 4, 
9, 14, 19, 3, 8, 15, 18, and so on, until all 
the sectors on die track ha\e been used 
;uid it jumps to sector of die next track. 
Track I , sectors ;uid 5 :is well as track 
18, sector ;ire reserved for special s\'S- 
tcni fi.inctioas and ;ire not included in the 
.sector-tilling set|uence table. 

Double-sitletl 1 28 CP.'M Llisks have ;ui 
allocatk)n unit size of 2K bytes or 8 pli\'s- 
ical sectors or 16 records. All of side Ls 
filled first, then side 1 in die same order. 
Track .^6 sectors and 5 ;uid track 5.^, 
sector C) (corresponding to die unu.sed 
sectors on side ) are not used on .side 1 . 

The 1 28 CP/.M dirccton- starts at 'logi- 
c:il" sector (side 0, track 1, sector 10) 
;uid continues for two allocation unit.s. 
( 128 CP/M accesses a disk sector b\- its 
"logical" number which refiL-rs to its posi- 
tion in die filling sec|uencc t:tble. ) For sin- 
gle-sided disks this is equivalent to 8 
pliysic;il sectors, tor double-sided disks, it 
is 16 ph)'sical sectors. Hach director)' en- 
tn' follows the stiuidard CP/M 32-b)te 
fomiat ;ls outlined below, 

liyle Meaning 

Reserved, for a good file, hex 
Se5 tor scratched file or empt\' 
entPi- 

1-8 Filename in ASC;il capital.s, pad- 
ded widi ASCII spaces 

9- 1 1 File t)pe in ASCII capitals 

1 2 DirectoPi' extent 

1 5 Wmiber of 1 28 b\te records in 
diis extent ( iiiiLximum hex S80 ) 

16.31 File allocation t;tble (numbers 
of logical AUs used b\' file, un- 
used locations set to 0) 

(;P/M filenames consist of two parts; a 
1 to 8 ch;iracter priman' name ;uid ;ui 
optional to 3 character secondar;' 
name, usually ciilled a file tvpe. Tlie file 
t)pe generally is a standard combination 
of dirce characters, such as HAS for a BA- 
SIC ]irognuii source code, COM tor ;ui 
executiible machine-kmgiiage prognuii, 
or TXT or 1X3S for a text file. In dirccton- 
listings and documentation, the t^-o 



parts of the filename are usually separat- 
ed by a period in the form of "FILE 
NAjME.EXT". jNote, howx-ver, diat die jie- 
ritKJ is not included in die actiuil directo- 
n- entr>- on die disk. If eidier die prinijin- 
filename or die file t\pe contains less 
than the maximum number of ch;irac- 
ters, the extra locadons in die dirccton,' 
entn- :ire padded widi ASC^II space cli;u-- 
acters (CHRS(32)). For example, the 
bytes representing the name "FILF.l" 
would appear in a directory entry as 
(decimal v:ilues): 

70 73 76 69 32 32 

32 32 49 32 32 

F 1 L E (4 spaces) 1 (2 spaces) 

Tlie actu;il location of die data in a file 
is recorded by the entries in die file allo- 
cation table. The value of each entr) re- 
presents an allocation unit number 
which contains die next part of the file. 
'llie entries in die table need not be in 
coasecuti\ e order, and often will not be 
on a frequently used disk with many 
scnitched files. Inused locations in die 
file ;dk)cation table f<)r each director)- en- 
tr)' Jire padded widi bv'tes. Tlie ]-)h\sic:tl 
sectors corresponding to die allocation 
units can be determined fi-oni the entries 
in die c;ilculated sector fill table, keeping 
in mind diat ftjr a single-sided disk each 
AU is four disk sectors ;uid a double-sid- 
ed AU is eiglit sectors. 

For single-sided disks, ihe maximum 
number of records per director)' entry is 
1 28 ( 1 6 stlkxration units x 8 records per 
AU), This ma)' also appcntr to put ;ui up- 
per liniit on die file size of l6K b)'tes. 
fortunately, CP/M has a wa)- around diis 
problem. For file sizes larger than 128 re- 
cords, addition:d dirccton- entries are 
created widi die same filen:uiic h\- widi a 
different director)' "extent" number 
(byte 12 ). 'llie extent starts at for a giv- 
en file and will increase by 1 for each 
added extent of the .siuiic file. The ex- 
tents need not (xrciipy con,secuti\e en- 
tries in die director)'. 

Ihe allocation t;ible tor double-,sided 
disk entries can hold up to 256 records 
(l6 allocation units b)- 16 records per 
AU ), Tliis is h;uidled b)- di\iding die entn- 
up into t\\'o logic;il extents of 128 re- 
cords each. I'or example, a double-sided 
entry with a record count of 127 will 
have an extent b)'te of 0. If two more re- 
cords ;trc added to die file, die extent 
byte of die s;uiie entn- will be chiuiged to 
1 :uid die record count will he 1.(1 ex- 
tent of 128 records + 1 addition;J re- 
cord = 129 records). Ilius, files up to 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 105 



128 USERS ONLY 



32k bncs long can be addressed b\- each 
duiible-sidcti directors' entry'. 

'Tile total disk capacity is 17()K bjtes 
lor n siiij;!c-si(.ied disk ( 5 lOK bytes l"br a 
double-sitlcti disk ) ofwliicii 1 60K ( 336K 
for double-sided) is a\ailable for data 
storage. Tlie m;Lximiim number of en- 
tries in die tiirecton- area is 6i for a sin- 
gle-sided disk or 12H tor a double-sided 
di.sk. Scratchetl or iiniLsetl entries ;ire sig- 
nified b\' a vjilue of iiex Se5 (dec 229 ) ft)r 
bue C). CF/M starts tilling die disk widi 
data in con.si'cuti\e allocation units start- 
ing at Al ■ number 2. .-Vs files become 
scratchetl, tiieir space on tlie director)' 
:md in die data area are made availalile 
tor oilier files. Tims, files c:ui become 
scattered throiiglioiit die disk. Tlie only 
link to reco\'er diese files is diat pro\-ided 
i')y die iillocation table in die directon-. 

MS-DOS 

MS-DOS and IBM PC-DOS are perhaps 
the most common operating system 
used in business computers. .MS-DOS 
conipatibilit)' is a hot topic iuiiong coni- 
[■)i!ter maniifactiirers these days. (Com- 
modore currendy offers die MS-DOS- 
biLscd PC- 10- 1 and PC-20-2 computers. 
Ilie Amiga offers .MS-DOS compatibility 
\'ia a s<ift\\';ire emulation program imd'or 
liardwiire adaptors. Odier niiuiiifacturers 
which previoush' marketed their own 
operating s')',stcms ( such as Ratlio Shack) 
are s¥,itcliing to li;ird\varc compatible 
machine.s. 

The most common MS-DOS 5 '/.-inch 
di.sk fomiat is 512 l-)\te.s per sector. 40 
tracks per side, double-sided, 9 sectors 
per track (version 2.0 or later). The 
tracks :ii'e numbered to 39 on each side 
anil die sectors ;ire numheretl I to 9 on 
each track. 'I'he total disk capacity is 
3C">0K b)les. of which 35-tK is asailalile 
tor diita storage. Tlie disk is oii^uiized 
into 720 logicid sectors numbered to 
719, each corresponding to 1 physical 
sector on die di.sk. Tlie logic;tl scctots are 
used as follows: 
Logical 
sector # Use 

Boot record 

1 -2 l-irst copy of file allocation 

table 
3-4 Second copy of file alloca- 

tion t:J")le 
5-11 Directory 

12-719 l>aui 

Ilie l-x)ot record is used b)' MS-DOS to 
distinguish l'>et\veen die viirious MS-DOS 
disk formats aiid to let die machine know 



if the disk contains tlie DOS boot pro- 
griims. which are normalh' hidden from 
tlie user in the director)'. 

'Ihe file allocation table ( 1-AT ) is simihu' 
in function to die C^Comnnxlore BAM. In 
addition, it also cont;uns the links be- 
tween difiercnt pieces of die s:une file, 
'llie first byte of the l-AT table is called a 
"media descriptor" b\te. For a double- 
sitled, 9 .sector per track tbniiat, it hits a 
value of hex Sid. Odier byte v;ilues ;ire 
used to describe odier .MS-DOS formats 
(diat it, single-sided, 8 .sectors per track, 
imd so on ), flic remaining b\tcs map out 
354 entries, each correspontling to one 
AL' or "cluster" of two adjacent logical 
sectors. Kach FATentn,' is 12 bits ( I 12 
bytes) long with two entries coded into 
dirce b\tes. The FAT value of an unallo- 
cated cluster is 0. An allocated cluster en- 
tn- contains die number of die ne.\t clus- 
ter in die tile. Tlic last cluster in a file hiLs 
;ui entry of 409 (hex Sfif). 

It should he noted that since diere are 
;ui odd number of sectors per track, die 
next "adjacent " logical sector niaj' in fact 
be on a ditferent track and- or side of die 
disk. A new disk widi no scratched files is 
filled alternately bet\\'een side and side 
1 for each track, widi .sectors on a given 
tnick filled in con.sccutive order. All of 
side 0, track is filled, dien sitle 1, track 
0, dien side 0, track I, etc., ending up 
widi side 1 , track 39- New filers \^'ritten to 
a dLsk with man)' pre\'iousl\' scratched 
files will ustialh' end up in bits ;uk1 pieces 
scattered all over the disk as the 
scratched file space is recovered for re- 
use. Two copies of die FAT:ire stored for 
later compitrLson during disk reads and 
writes to ensure dial die disk has not 
been tlamaged or comipted. 

The .MS-DOS directon entries ;ire 32 
b)tes long, widi one entry per file. Up to 
1 1 2 entries c:in be made in die main (or 
nxn) director), widi more entries in sub- 
directories. The sub-directorie.s are 
stored in \';trious locations on the disk as 
files, but widi die "attribute" b)te set to a 
value indicating "sub-directon" in die 
main director)- entn,'. Tliere is no limit, 
other thiui a\'aiiable disk space, on die 
number of sub-directories. Sub-sub di- 
rectories are also pemiittetl. to several 
nested le\els. The significance of die di- 
rectory b)tes are ;ls follows. 

Byte Meaiihig 

6-7 Filename, speci;il ^■:tlues for 

byte 0; a value of indi- 
cates unu.sed entrv. Se5 in- 



dicates a scratched file 
8-tO File t)pe 

11 File attribute (hidden tile, 

system file, vohimc label. 

sub-director\', etc. ) 
12-21 Re.senedby DOS 

22-25 Time :ind date stiuii]! 
26-2'' Starting cluster number: 

kn\ b\'te. Iiigli h)'te 
28-29 Low order \xirt of file size: 

low, high b)te 
30-31 Higli order p;(rt of file size: 

low. higli b)te 

Tlie filen:uiie and file t)pe are liLUulled 
in die same ni;uiner as CFM. Iliat is. 8 
characters for die file iiiune and 3 for die 
file t)pe, widi unusetl locadons padded 
with ASilU spaces. MS-DOS incor|:K)rates 
automatic time luul tiate stamping of di 
rector)' entries, llie st;un[is are read Irom 
die system time ol day (TOD ) clock and 
are coded in a fairh' complex fkshion into 
die director)^ entn'. Tlic MS-DOS dirccto- 
r)- cntr) incorporates elements found iti 
bodi Commotlore DOS ;uid CF/M. Simi- 
ktr to (Commodore DOS. each director)' 
cntr)' cont;tirLS die starting location only 
of the file ;ind die file lengdi. ilie file size 
is a 32-bit number gt^'ing the number of 
b)lcs in die tile, thus allowing ver)' kirge 
files. In practice, die maximum file size is 
limitetl by die capacit)' of the di.sk long 
liefore this size is reached. Similar to 
C;PM, links to sirhsequcnt p;(rts of a file 
:ire stored in a file allocation table. In MS- 
DOS, however, the I'AT is separate ftx)m 
die directory. 

Super Sweep 128 

Based on knowledge of various disk 
formats, I ha\e written scvcnJ file con- 
\ersion prognuns to run on an IBM-PC 
( MS-IX )S < > C;P'M-86 ) and a 1 28 ( SIX) 
<> CP/M). Tlie most powertiil one to 
date is Super Sweep 128, a comersioii 
prognuii for Uic 128 wiUi a 1571 drive 
which c;m li;uidle SFQ. CI 28 CP/M (SS 
luid DS) iuid M.S-DOS file con\'ei'^ioiis. 

Super Sweep 1 28 is an easy to use BA- 
SIC 7.0 program for die 1 28 -widi one or 
two disk drives and ;m 80-colunin displa)' 
monitor 'Hie program is roughly mod- 
eled on die jxipular ( !P .\1 file c< )p)' ulilil) 
"SVi'TEPCOM". but widi a major tlifier- 
ence: It can rcad/write/translate files 
from/to iuiy one of die follo\\ing fi\c disk 
fbmiaLs: 

SEQ-ASCil 

SEQ-widi PETSCII <> ASCII conver 

.sion 



106 MARCH '87 



128 USERS ONLY 



C128CP/Msinglc-sidcd 

CI 28 CP/M doubk-sidcd 

MS-DOS doulilc-sidcd, 9 sectors'crack 

Witli Super S\\'L-cp 1 28, tJic selection 
of source and t;irgct file tjpes ;irc toailly 
independent — tliey can be the sanie or 
different in any combination. For CP/M 
and MS-!;)OS files, at least one of tlic disk 
drives iiTiist l>c a 1 57 1 . Of course, a 1 54 1 
(or compatible) can be used to read or 
write SHQ files. One word of caution, 
however. Because the 1571 is not a true 
MS-DOS disk dri\e, never write MS-DOS 
files to an original, irrejilaccable disk. 
Play it safe and ;ilv\'ays use scratch disks 
for writing files. (Altliougli I have had no 
problems witli disks from tlirec different 
IBM-PCs and four PC-compatibles, tlie 
possibility does exist for mismatched 
sector timing ;uid tilings like tliat. 'Ihis 
could corn.ipt tile disk being written to. ) 

listing 1 is a BASIC loatler for tlie ma- 
chine-language jxirtion of the program. 
You will only have to run this progrimi 
once. It creates a progrimi file n;mied 
"SS.Ml.l" which is automatic;illy loaded 
b)' die iiimn prognuii each time it is run. 
Tlie niachinc-liuiguage routine, wliich is 
located in the cassette and RS 232 buff- 
ers, contains sevenil cntn,- i-xiints. 
Address I'unclion 

hex dee 

Ob(K) 2816 Analyze disk format 
0b69 2921 Burst sector read (for 

CP/M and MS-DOS) 
Ob9a 2970 Read SEQ, no convert 
Obed 3021 Write SEQ, no convert 
Oblb 3067 Burst sector write (for 

CP/M and MS-DOS) 
0c7I 3185 Write SEQ, convert .\SCII 

to FETSCII 
Ocd4 3284 Read SEQ file, convert 

pi:'i>;cii to ASCII 
Od5c 3-120 Pill to end of sector witli 

spaces 

If you are interested, you can disas- 
semble tlie machine l:uigiiage witli the 
I28's built-in monitor command. Super 
Sweep 1 28 uses burst mode on the 1571 
to read and write MS-DOS and CP/M files. 
Consequendy, it is cjuite last. (A detailed 
description of 1 57 1 burst mcxle and how- 
to use it will be jiresented next niontli in 
this magazine. ) A tvpical conversion of a 
30K byte (120 SEQ block) text file fium 
MS-DOS to SEQ-PETSCIl takes about two 
minutes, including about 25 seconds of 
"overhead" required to decode die MS- 
DOS director)' ;uid file allocation table. 

Listing 2 is tlie main BASIC program. 



As you can see, there are no REM stitte- 
ments in the body of the program. In tr\- 
ing to maximize the available buffer 
space tor file transfers, I chose to leave 
tliem out. The following table summa- 
rizes its main parts. 



Line 


Function 


10 


Check 80-column screen 




on 


20 


Clear screen, load ma- 




chine language, GOTO 




main menu 


30-60 


Error routines 


70-110 


Burst mode read and 




write subn)utines 


120-140 


Ijog in disks 


150-200 


Screen display subrou- 




tines 


210-240 


.Set default pitrameter val- 




ues 


250-350 


Main menu and source/ 




target selections 


360-400 


Calculate CP/M sector se- 




quence table 


410-620 


Read source disk directo- 




ry 


630-720 


Select files to copy 


730-830 


Copy files 


840-860 


Read SEQ file 


870-880 


Write SEQ file 


890-920 


Read CP/M file 


930-1100 


Write CP/M file 


1110-1150 


Read MS-DOS file 


1160-1270 


Write MS-DOS file 


1280 


Quit 



You may have noticed that most of the 
firequently called subroutines are at tlie 
beginning of tlie program. This helps to 
speed up the execution of the program. 
BASIC 7.0 searches for line numbers to 
GOTO or GOSUB starting at the begin- 
ning of a program. Therefore, in a long 
program, a GOSUB 1 would execute fas- 
ter than a GOSUB KXX) because line 10 
occurs sooner than line 10(X). 

Super Sweep 128 is simple to use — 
just follow tlie pnjmpts on the screen. 
T\pe in and sa\ e a copy of Ixjdi Listing 1 
and Listing 2. When you run Super 
Sweep 128, make certain diat the disk 
with the "SS.MLl " file cre-ated by Listing 1 
is in disk drive unit 8. (Once tlie file type 
selection menu appears on the screen, 
you can remove tiic SS.MLl disk from the 
drive. ) Also make sure that you have an 
80-colLimn display monitor connected. 

Tlie prompts on the screen will nsk 
you to enter tlie file t)pe ;uid disk drive 
unit number for both source and target 
files. (The source file is the one being 



copied from, while the target is tlie one 
being copied to. ) The pn)gnim will tlien 
check to see tliat die reciuested drives 
lire turned on luitl ;u"e capable of hiuv 
dliiig die selected file type. If an error is 
detected, you will be asked to re-select 
your drive and file type. If either source 
or target file t)pe was selected as CP/M, 
the program will then c;i]ciilate tlie CP/M 
logiciil sector fill table as outlined pre- 
viously. 

Once all of the preliminaries have 
been taken care of, you will be prompted 
to ii^scrt the source disk, tlie program 
will dien take a few momcnLs to read in 
the disk directory and enter the file 
names into array N S( ). Tlie next step is to 
select die files you want to copy. Super 
Sweep 128 is capable of cop\ ing a group 
of one or more files at a lime in a butch. 
As each filen;ime is displayed, you :ire 
given die option of pressing a numlxT of 
special keys. Tliese ke\s. which are al.so 
summarized on the display screen, con- 
sist of: 

T : tag a file for copying 

U : untag a file 

N ; (or any odier kt^' not listed) ad- 
vance to next file 

C : Start cop\ing tagged files 

R ; go back t(j die file t\pe and drive 

selection menu 

Q : (Or <ESC> ) quit 

Scroll through the fist (Affiles and ni;irk 
the ones you want to cop}' widi die T 
key. After tagging each file, you will be 
given tiic option to lUter die filename for 
the target file. Press RETl'RN if )0u w;uit 
to keep the same name as die source file 
or enter a new n;inic. Tlus feature allows 
)'ou to adjust die filename to suit die dif- 
ferent format of CP/M and MS-DOS and 
SEQ type directory entries. When trans- 
ferring from SEQ to eidier CP/M or MS- 
DOS, v'Ou should take care that the file- 
name does not cont;iin any periods and is 
a niiiximum of 1 1 characters long. When 
transferring to SEQ from eidier CP/M or 
MS-DOS, you can remove anv' extra 
spaces in the filename that are caused by 
a filename with less than die maximum 
number of characters. Once die last file 
has been displayed, the list will cycle 
back to die first file in die director)-. "Sou 
can then tag some more files or un-tag 
some previously ta^ed ones. 

Once you have chosen :d] die files for 
copying, press the C key to start the 
copying process. You will then be 
prompted to insert die target disk. ;ind 
the process begins. If you are luck\- 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 107 



128 USERS ONLY 



enougli to have two disk drives, yoii can 
sit back ;md rcliLx because no disk-swap- 
ping will be retjiiired. If yon ;ire using a 
single drive, you will Ix; prompted to 
swap disks at the correct time. It is a 
good idea to cover the write-protcct 
notch on tlie source disk if you :irc doing 
a lot of s\\apping to ]irc\eiit accident;illy 
writing to tlie wrong disk. It is also im- 
portant that you complete the entire 
copying process when die t;irgct file type 
Ls cither CPM or MSIX.XS, because tlie 
ujxlatcd director}- is only written to tlic 
tai^et disk ;dter AIJ. files have been cop- 
ied. (SEQ t>ix- disk directories ;u-e uixlat- 
cd automatic;illy after each file hiLs been 
copied.) 

Super Sv^'cep 128 contains numerous 
ern)r detection and correction routines. 
Howe\er just to Ix- .s;ife, always double- 
check that you lia\e the correct disk in 
tlie correct dri\e before pitxccding fi-om 
a prompt. In addition, nc\'cr remo\c a 
disk from a dri\c without first being 
pn)nipted to insen another one. Su[kt 
Swec]-) 128 does not check tor dLijilicate 
filen;uncs when writing to CP/M and MS- 
IXJS disks, so be carcftil when writing to 
these disks. 

llic mxxiinum tile .si/c tliat can be 
tnuisterred in ;uiy direction is -lOK bytes. 
Longer files will be truncated to this 
lengtli. Til is is cqiii\'alent to 160 SEQ 
blocks or ne;irh' dnee full C-F/M directo- 
rj' extents, ;uid is a vcr\' long progriun or 
text file. All files in menion ;ire assiinxd 
to he in .-VSCIl format. Sl-Q iniT files read 
firom disk ;ire sissumed to he PI-H'Sdll on 
tlie disk luid ;ire tnuislated to .VSCII as 
they are read iix SEQ PET files w ritten to 
disk arc as,sumcd to be ASCII I in memon- 
iuid iire con\erted to PIHSCIl as ihey are 
written to tlisk. /\ll other tnuLsfers :u-e 
done ill a binan' what-you-seeis-what- 
you-get f:Lshi(^n. 

Wlien reading the MS-DOS director); 
Su]x-r Sv\-eep 128 ignores tlie file attri- 
bute ( byte 1 1 ). except for the \-olunie la- 
bel and sLilxlirecton' attributes which do 
not represent \'alid files. Tliis lets you dis- 
play and access hidden ;uid s^'Stem files 
wiiicii do not show up («i ;in .MS-DOS 
DIR director)' comniiuid. Super Sv\ecp 
1 28 sets director)' bytes 1 1-25 luul .^0-3 1 
to when it is wTiting a nev\' file, 'lliis is 
easier tlimi tr)ing to calculate a file cre- 
ation time, date, attribute, and so on. 
Zero bytes in these kxations are accept- 
ed b)' MS-DOS. 

Super Sweep 1 28 will reco\'er unused 
and scratched director)- ;md ckita space 



for l:xidi CP/M :ind MS-tx:)S disks, lliis is 
handled automatiealh' b)' Commodore 
IX)S when writing to SE^Q files. 

File Transfer Tips 

Super Swec]") c;ui be tised for siinjile 
,^SCII <> PEI-SCII conversion of SliQ 
files widi cidxT a 1 571 or 1 5-1 1 (or other 
compatible) drive in die following man- 
ner 

PE'VSai to ASCII — source file t\pe = 
SEQ PET 
t;irget file type = 

si-:q ,\s<:ii ' 

ASCU to Ptl^H — source file t)pe = 

si-;q asc:ii 

tiu-get file t)-pe = 

si:q pi: t 

One word of caution for Plil'SCII <> 
ASCill con\ersions. Super Sv\'eep 1 28 
strips out control ctxles (yXSCll value less 
than 32) and certain otlxr sjx'ci:il ctxles 
in lx)tli directinas. It also adds a linelc-ed 
chiinicter (ASCII CIIRS( 10)) ;ifter each 
cmriage return when con\'erting to iSS- 
Cll and removes ;ill linefeeds when con- 
verting to PETSCII. The presence of 
these codes in, for cxiuiiple, text format- 
tetl on a CP/M word processor ma)' le- 
quire tile text to be refonnatted with a 
1 28 word processor before it can be 
used in 128 mode. In addition, docu- 
nients originally written or edited with 
some word pn)cc-ssors (such ;is Word- 
Skir~-citiv:r CP/M or MS-DOS version) 
shoidd be handled in non-document 
mode (st;uxl;uxl ASCI!) on these word 
pn)cessors if die)' ;ire intentled to be suh- 
sec|uentl)' used in 128 nnxle. WonlSlar 
sets the higli bit of die last ch:iracter of 
each word in document motle. 'litis re- 
sults in M\ incorrect ASCII to Pi:rsc:il 
con\ersion. 

Super Sweep 128 is designed mainl\- 
for tnuisfcrring text -.ind data fJes. Iliis 
brings up a genenil ca%cat. Prognuii files 
written to run Liiider .MS-DOS ( wiUi a file 
t\pe of EXE or .COM) will not work on 
the 128 or on a CP/M machine (the 
CP/M executable file alsti h;Ls a file t\'jie 
of.COM, but the two are not inter- 
ehangeable ) or \'ice versa. However, 
C:P/M prognuns for one machine, such :ls 
die TRS-80, will usual!)' work widiout 
ch;uige on ;uiodicr CP .VI machine stich 
as the 128 in CPM mcxle. In addition. If 
you download a c:P/.\I program to :ui MS- 
ix)S disk mid tlien con\ert die file to 
CP/M foniiat, tile pn)gram will work in 
CPM mtKle on die 1 28. Iliis is usetlil. for 



ex;miple, if )'ou do not ha\-e a modem on 
your 128 but ha\'e access to one on an 
MS-DOS comfxiier elsewhere. "Hie s;uiie 
goes tor downloading to SEQ fbniiat in 
128 HKxIe ;uid dien con\'ertiiig to CP/.\I 
format. (The original \ersion of 128 
CPM did not support a mcKlem. Ilic up- 
graded \'ersk)n now docs, ) 

bask; source ecxle prognuns are often 
interchangeable bet\\een MS-DOS acid 
CPM, if die) have been s;i\ed in Xrl.W 
format (not tokenized fonn ) and do not 
contain ad\-;uiced features specific to one 
or die odier machine, such ;ls graphics or 
souiitl. ,\1S-D(.>S I4ASK ; ( i.e.. ( A\-»ASIC or 
IB.M BASIC ) Luul 1 28 \\,\S\C "O ;ire actu 
all)' extended \'ersioas of die origind .\li 
crosoft MBASIC used on most CPM ma- 
chines. BASIC source code listings pn)- 
duced ;ls text files on Commodore com- 
puters Ciui. often be used on CP/M and 
MS-DOS niacliines (and vice versa) with 
only minor editing to reflect different 
S)'nt;L\ of some commiuids. 

To tnui.sfer the listings fix)m one ma- 
chine to anoUier, tlie ]")rugr;uii must be 
first saved as ;ui /VSCIl text file on the 
origin;il machine. (Tlie tokeni/cd ]5ro- 
grams for the various B.-VSICs are not 
compatible in either fomiat or kcN^word 
tokens. ) In MS-DC )S ;uid C;P'.\1 B/\SIC ;, tiiis 
is done h)- apjx-ntling an "JC to die end 
t)f die SA\''E coiiim;uid: 

SAN'E. "filen;ime"A 
In 128 BASIC 7.0, it is done b)' listing the 
prognuii to a disk file: 

OPEN 8,8,8,'();fileii;uiie.s,\\ ■ 

CMD8;l.[Sr 

PRlNT#8:CEOSE8 

Non-standard ch.'iracter codes embed- 
ded in program text (such as color 
ctxles, reverse \'itleo ;uid cursor controls ) 
.slioukl be edited out, either before or 
after conversion. Ixcause Uie\' ma)' cause 
MS-DOS and CP/M BASICS to lxha\e in 
(xld niiuiners. To load an rSSC.W file wiili 
MS-DOS or C:P/M BASIC, the normal 
EOAD"filenanie" command is used. ,\ 
SEQ text file c:ui ;ilso Ix- kxided its a pro- 
gram on the 1 28. This is done in the fol- 
lowing manner (many thanks to col- 
league Jim Butteriield for demonstrating 
this trick to me ). 

DOPEN#l,"filen;une" 

STS 65478,0. 1 

DCl.OSE 
Incidentiilh. fills is no magical ROyi rou- 
tine, but the standard KERNAI. "CHKEN" 
liinction at hex Si-'ECXi which 1i;ls been 
enhiuiced on die 1 28. 

'Ilie file to be read in should be sa\ed 



V08 MARCH '87 



128 USERS ONLY/SUPERSWEEP 128 



as a SEQ-ASCII file with Super Sweep 
128. Tliis routine reads in the text file 
listing luid converts it to a program, just 
as if you had entered each line directly 
from tlie keyboard. Because of tlais, it will 
merge witli, but not erase any program 
lines currendy in memon: It can. tlicre- 
fore, also be used to merge tw'o or more 
1 28 prognuns. You may get a s^'iiUix er- 
ror or out of data message :ifter tlie pro- 
gram listing has been read in. Tiiis is 
caused b)' any extraneous text which 
may be included at tlie end of tlie listing 
file. Nonn;illy, howe\-er, it has no effect 
on die loading on die progr;uii. 

Tlie format of die BASIC source _code 



is important for files to be used with MS- 
DOS or CP/M BASIC. 1 28 B,ASIC 7.0 does 
not require spaces between ke^'words 
:uid iirgumenLs, while botli MS-DOS ;uid 
CPAl BASICS do. For example, tlie state- 
ment 10 FORI = 1 TO 10 is legitimate in 
BASIC 7.0. For MS-DOS and CPAI BASIC 
it must be changed to 10 FOR I = 1 TO 
10. 

It is also important to remember tliat 
the number of significant characters in 
BASIC 7.0 variable names is limited to 
two, while both MS-DOS and CP/M BA- 
SICS have no such restriction, VARI- 
ABLE 1 and VALUE2 arc distinct \ariable 
names in MS-DOS and CP/M BASICs. 



Before taping mis]JTOgf"~™read How to Ema^^anB" and "^^wroffiemc .Magazine 220 
Enin- Program." The BASIC programs in this magazine arc available on disk from Loadstar, 
P.O. Box .WOO"', Shrevepori, LA ^ll.W 0007, 1-800.83 l-269i 

23ef 

Listing 1 

10 PRINT" [CLEAR] CREATING MACHINE 240 

LANGUAGE PORTION OF"'BATI 
20 PRINT" [DOWN2,SPACE9] 

SUPER SWEEP 128" 'BAND 250 

30 PRINT" [DOWN2,SPACE15]BY"'BAFC 
40 PRINT" [DOWN, SPACE9]M. 

GARAMSZEGHY"'BAEF 260 

50 SU=0:FOR 1=2816 TO 3445:READ X 

:POKE I,X:SU = SU-(-X:NEXT' JBDN 270 

60 IF SUO 84362 THEN PRINT" [ D0WN2 , 

RVS] ERROR IN DATA STATEl^ENTS ! ! " 280 
lEND'GIWO 
70 BSAVE"SS.ML1",B0,P2816 TO P3445 290 

:PRINT" — > DONE < — ":END'ERON 
100 DATA 133,251,160,0,132,250,140,0, 

255, 120, 44, 13, 220, 3 2, 93, 11 'BERF 300 
110 DATA 32,61,11,201,2,144,27,41,14, 

201, 0,208, 2 1,32, 61, 11 'BYUF 
120 DATA 41,14,201,0,208,17,32,61,11, 310 

3 2, 6 1,1 1,32, 6 1,11, 32 'BXXG 
130 DATA 61,11,88,32,204,255,96,142,1, 320 

19,7 6,50,H,16 9,8,44'BYBH 
140 DATA 13,220,240,251,173,0,221,73, 330 

16, 141, 0,221, 173, 12, 22 0, 162 'BFS J 
150 DATA 63,142,0,255,145,250,162,0, 340 

142, 0,255, 200, 96, 173,0, 221 'BOKK 
160 DATA 73,16,141,0,221,173,12,220, 350 

96,133,2 52,134,2 50,132,251, 

160'BHDM 360 

170 DATA 0,140,0,255,120,44,13,220,32, 

93,11,32,61,11,41,14 'BYWL 370 

180 DATA 201,0,208,20,160,0,32,61,11, 

192, 0,208, 249, 16 6, 252, 202 'BDDN 380 
190 DATA 134,252,230,251,224,0,208, 

238, 88, 96, 133, 25 1,169,0, 141, 0'BFYP 
200 DATA 255,133,250,32,198,255,160,0, 390 

3 2, 207, 25 5, 162, 63, 142,0, 255 'BGXH 
210 DATA 145,250,162,0,142,0,255,32, 400 

183,255,208,12,200,208,233, 

230'BHCI 



DATA 251, 

132,250,7 

132'BJXJ 

DATA 252, 

32,201,25 

DATA 0,25 

255,32,21 

230'BGEL 

DATA 251, 

32,204,25 

160'BLWN 

DATA 0,13 

134,252,1 

DATA 255, 
248,69,25 

DATA 63,1 
142,0,255 
DATA 73,6 
220,240,2 
254 'BHUQ 
DATA 202, 
208,200,2 
220'BGUI 
DATA 173, 
8,44,13,2 
DATA 12,2 
239,141,0 
DATA 96,1 
250,141,0 
DATA 0,16 
162,0,142 
DATA 13,2 
37,201,64 
DATA 0,24 
208,7,165 
DATA 187, 
12,165,25 
DATA 0,20 
228,252,2 
169'BJLQ 
DATA 0,76 
133,250,1 
DATA 160, 
208,86,32 



while in BASIC 7.0, they are both equiv- 
alent to "\'A". 

Aldiougli it is not an MS-DOS emula- 
tor, you will find Super Sweep 1 28 an in- 
valuable utility' for transferring files from 
one macliine to anodier (and between 
modes on the 128 also) if you use both 
an MS-DOS computer and a 128. It is also 
possible, widi a little det:iiled knowledge 
of the disk formats, to use the same prin- 
ciples for transferring flies to/from other 
computers and operating sj'stems that 
use MFM t)pe disks, such as TRS-DOS 
used on die Radio Shack computers or 
possibly RS CoCo OS/9 disks to PET OS/9 
format. Q 

173,0,19,197,251,208,224, 
6,204,255,133,251, 

160,0,132,250,140,0,255, 
5, 160, 0,162, 63, 142 'BFXJ 
5,177,250,162,0,142,0, 
0,255,200,208,238, 

165,252,197,251,208,230, 
5,96,133,254,132,251, 

2,250,140,0,255,162,64, 
2 0,160,0,56,32,71 'BDEM 

173,0,221,205,0,221,208, 
2, 41, 64, 240, 242, 162 "BGSO 
42,0,255,177,250,162,0, 
,141, 12, 220, 165, 252 'BFHP 
4,133,252,169,8,44,13, 
51,200,208,211,166, 

134,254,230,251,224,0, 

4,32,71,255,44,13, 



0,221,9,16,141,0,221,169, 

20,240,251,173'BCOI 

20,133,255,173,0,221,41, 

,221, 8 8, 32, 204, 255 'BFGK 

32,252,133,251,169,0,133, 

,255, 32, 201, 255, 160 'BHKL 

2,63,142,0,255,177,250, 

,0,255,13 3,254,201'BEKL 

4 0,40,165,254,201,31,144, 

,24 0,30, 41, 192, 201 'BGWN 

0,22,155,254,41,32,201,0, 

,254,9,128,76'BBCN 

12,165,254,41,95,76,187, 

4, 32, 210, 255, 200, 192 'BHPP 

8,190,230,251,166,251, 

08,182,32,204,255,96, 

,187,12,133,251,169,0, 
4 1,0, 255, 32, 198, 255 'BEHQ 
0,76,234,12,32,183,255, 
, 207, 255, 133, 254, 201 "BGY J 



COMMODORE MAGAZINE 109 



128 USERS ONLY/SUPERSWEEP 128 



410 
420 
430 
440 
450 

460 

470 
480 
490 

10 
20 



DATA 13, 
145,250, 
DATA 192 
197,251, 
DATA 13, 
0,240,8, 
DATA 0,2 
63,142,0 
DATA 142 
230,251, 
165'BJJO 
DATA 132 
254,41,3 
DATA 9,3 
76,39,13 
DATA 162 
32,145,2 
DATA 142 



208,30, 
162,0,1 
,0,208, 
240,52, 
201,64, 
165,254 
40,35,1 
,255,14 
,0,255, 
165,251 



162,63 
42,0,2 
8,230, 
169,10 
240,18 
,41,12 
65,254 
5,250, 
200,19 
,201,2 



,142,0 
55,200 
251,16 
,76,39 
,41, 19 
8,201' 
,41,12 
162,0' 
2 ,0,20 
54,208 



,255, 

' BEDJ 

9,254, 

'BFTL 

2,201, 

BEKL 

7,162, 

BERM 

8,173, 



,250,32,204,2 
2,201,0,208,7 
2,76,39,13,16 
,133,251,134, 
,63,142,0,255 
50,200,208,25 
,0,255,96,0,0 

Listing 2 



55,96,165, 

,165,254 'BFWP 

5,254,41,95, 

250'BCAP 

,160,0,169, 

1,162,0'BFGR 



IF RGR(0)<>5 THEN PRINT" [CLEAR, RVS] 
SWITCH TO 80 COL [DOWN]" 
:PRINT"THEN TYPE RUN" : END ' IGFL 
TRAP 30:WINDOW 0,0,79,24,1 
:BLOAD"SS. ML* ",B0,P2816: GRAPHIC CLR 
:FAST:GOTO 210'HISL 
30 PRINT ERR$ (ER) :GOSUB 190'DIFC 
40 IF EL=20 THEN RESUME 20 ' EGPE 
50 IF ER=5 AND EL=130 THEN A$="R" 

: RESUME 700'HOUJ 
60 IF ER=4 THEN RESUME 820 

:ELSE RESUME 630'GKGI 
70 SA=SA(3) :SE=1:ZS=0:FOR D2=Z1 TO Z2 
:PRINT#F,"U0(a"+CHR$ (T(DZ) ) +CHR$(S 
(DZ) ) +CHR5 (1)+CHR$ (T(DZ) ) rGGSQB 90 
: NEXT :DM=AD+256 : RETURN ' UMVG 
80 SA=TA(3) :SE=2:PRINT#3, 

"O0"+CHR$(Bl+2)+CHR$ (TR) +CHR$ (DZ) 
+CHRS (1)+CHR$ (TR) ' JEW 
90 AD=DM+ZS*256*SE:IF AD>=TP THEN 
RETURN:ELSE SYS ( SA) , SE, , AD/256 
:ZS=ZS+1: RETURN 'POYY 
100 SA=SA(3) :SE=2:PRINT#F, 

"U0"+CHR$ (Bl) +CHR$ (TR)+CHR$ (DZ) 
+CHR$(1) +CHR§ (TR) :GOTO 90'OLXN 
110 SA=TA(3) :SE=1: ZS=0:FOR DZ=Z1 TO Z2 
: PRINT#3 , "U0B"+CHR$ (T (DZ) ) +CHRS (S 
(DZ) ) +CHR$ (1) +CHR$ (T (DZ) ) iGOSQB 90 
: NEXT :DM=AD+256: RETURN 'UMFY 
120 PRINT TAB(20) " [D0WN6] 

INSERT "TY$(XF)" DISK IN UNIT #"D 
:PRINT TAB(22) ; :GOTO 190'FUSK 
130 CLOSE F:POKE 2588,0 

:OPEN F,D,15,"U0":Q=PEEK(2588) AND 
64: IF Q = 64 OR XF<3 THEN 
RETURN'MICN 
140 PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN3,SPACE3J 

"TY$(XF)" DISK REQUIRES A 1571 
DRIVE" :GOSUB 190:A$="R" 
:GOTO 700'ESJN 
150 WINDOW 3, 3, 77, 19,1: RETURN 'CNED 



160 WINDOW 0,21,79,24,1:RETURN'CQQF 
170 WINDOW 3,9,74,19,1:RETURN'CNCG 
180 WINDOW 50,9,77,19,1 

:PRINT" ENTER [SPACE4)F0R [DOWN] " 

:FOR 1=1 TO 5:PRINT I" — >[SPACE2] 

"TY$(I) :NEXT:WINDOW 3,9,45,19,1 

: RETURN ' JQTV 
190 POKE 208,0:PRINT FO$"[DOWN] 

** PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE **"FF$ 

:GET KEY A5:RETURN 'FQZS 
200 BANK 0:F3$="":FOR J=l TO 11 

:F3$=F3$+CHR${PEEK(Y+J) ) :NEXT 

: RETURN 'MBO J 

210 PB=PEEK(4 62 5) * 256 + 25 6 :CB=PB + 5120 

:BU=CB+5120:TP=6502 3 

:POKE 4864,TP/256'LBWP 
220 FO$=CHR$ (15) :FF$=CHRS (14 3) :SD=8 

:TD=9:SF=1:TF=2:CF=0 

:BL$="iSPACEl5] " ' KPLQ 
230 DIM T(1360) ,S (1360) ,ES(16) ,FA(2, 

361) ,SM(36) ,N5(144) ,NT$(144) , 

NI (144) ,TY$ (5) 'BVHO 
240 SA(1)=2970:SA(2)=3284:SA(3)=2921 

:TA(1) =3021:TA(2) =3185 

:TA(3)=3067'GJDQ 
250 PRINT" [CLEAR] "TAB (32) "SUPER SWEEP 

128":PRINT TAB(31)"BY M. 

GARAMSZEGHY"'EHDO 
260 PRINT" [CMDR A] "; 

:PRINT" [SHPT *) "; 

: PRINT" [CMDR S] "; 

:CHAR,1, I," [SHFT -] " 

: CHAR, 78, I," [SHFT -] "iNEXT'NFSU 
270 PRINT" [SPACE2, CMDR Z)"; 

:FOR 1=1 TO 76:PRINT"[SHFT *]"; 

:NEXT: PRINT" [CMDR X]";'HLRM 
280 TY$(1)="SEQ ASCII" :TY${2)="SEQ 

PET[SPACE2] " :TY$ (3)="CP/M SS 

(SPACE2] ":TY$(4)="CP/M DS [SPACE2] " 

:TY$(5)="MS-D0S DS"'FJKB 
290 GOSUB 150: PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN] 

ENTER SOURCE DRIVE CHARACTERISTICS 

:"'CEVR 
300 GOSUB ia0:PRINT"FILE TYPE[SPACE41 

"SF"[LEPT4) "; : INPUT SF'DKQG 
310 GOSUB 170:PRINT"UNIT #[SPACE2] 

"SD" [LEFT4] " ; : INPUT SD : XF=SF :D=SD 

:F=1:G0SUB 130'HBIN 
320 GOSUB 150:PRINT" [CLEAR, DOWN] 

ENTER TARGET DRIVE CHARACTERISTICS 

:"'CELL 
330 GOSUB 130:PRINT"FILE TYPE[SPACE4] 

"TF" [LEFT4J ";: INPUT TF'DKSJ 
340 GOSUB 170:PRINT"UNIT #[SPACE2] 

"TD" [LEFT4] "; : INPUT TD: XF=TF:D=TD 

:F=2:G0SUB 130:GOSUB 150'IFFR 
350 DCLOSE U(SD);DCLOSE U (TD) 

:IF CF=0 AND(SF=3 OR SF=4 OR TF=3 

OR TF=4)THEN CF=1:ELSE 410'PNSV 
360 CHAR,19,10,FO5+"** INITIALIZING 

CP/M SECTOR TABLE **"+FF$'DNLR 
370 FOR 1=1 TO 17:SM(I)=20:NEXT 



;FOR 1 = 
;NEXT 
:FOR 1 = 



1 TO 76 



3 TO 19 



110 MARCH '87 



128 USERS ONLY/SUPERSWEEP 128 




:FOR 1=18 TO 24:SM(I)=18:NEXT 




DISK!!": PRINT" [DOWN] 




:FOR 1=25 TO 30 : SM ( I ) =17 :NEXT 




INSERT CORRECT DISK":GOSUB 190 




:FOR 1=31 TO 35 : SM ( I ) =16 :NEXT ' UICE 




:GOTO 54 0'FKCT 


380 


T=1:S=10:TC=2:FOR 1=0 TO 679 


630 


GOSUB 160:PRINT"OPTIONS:" 




:T{I)=T:T (1+680) =T+35:S (I)=S 




:PRINT" T — > TAG FILE TO COPY 




:S (I+680)=S:S=S+5:TC=TC+1 




[SPACE61U — > UN-TAG A FILE 




: IF S>SM(T)THEN S=S-SM (T) -1 ' XXFN 




[SPACE101N — > NEXT FILE" ' DFJY 


390 


IF TC>SM(T)THEN T=T+1 : S=0 : TC=0 


640 


PRINT" C — > COPY TAGGED FILES 




:IF T=18 THEN S=5 : TC=1 ' MCWU 




[SPACES] R — > RESET SOURCE/TARGET 


400 


NEXT:GOSUB 150'CEWY 




[SPACE4]Q --> QUIT";'BBYU 


410 


XF=SF:D=SD:F=2:G0SUB 120:GOSUB 130 


650 


GOSUB 150:PRINT" iD0WN2] 




:GOSUB 150:DR=0:F1=1 




"TAB(10)TY$ (SF) " FILES ON UNIT 




:IF SF=4 THEN F1=2'MNCP 




#"SD:GOSUB 170 : CO=0 ' FYMR 


420 


CHAR,22,10,FO$+"** READING SOURCE 


660 


FOR 1=1 TO MX:PRINT I" 




DIRECTORY * * " + FF$ : FI = 1 : DK=PB ' FWVQ 




: [SPACE2] "NS (I) ; :IF NI(I)THEN 


430 


FA=F1:MX=0:ON SF GOSUB 440,440, 




PRINT TAB(30)"--> "NT? ( I ) ; ' IDRS 




510,510,540:GOTO 630'FJXL 


670 


GET KEY A$:IF A$="C"THEN GOSUB 160 


440 


PRINT#2,"I0":OPEN 1,SD,0,"50:*=S" 




:GOSUB 150:GOTO 730'IQNP 




:IF DS THEN 500:ELSE SYS SA(1), 


680 


IF A$="T"THEN IF NI(I)=0 THEN 




PB/256,l'HFLO 




N I ( I ) =1 : C0=C0+1 : NT$ ( I ) =N$ { I) 


450 


M=PEEK(250)+PEEK{251)*256:BANK 




: INPUT" [SPACE2]—> TARGET FILE 




:FOR I=PB+32 TO M-32 STEP 32 




NAME", -NTS (I) 'LPDE 




:MX=MX+1'0J0U 


690 


IF A$="U"THEK IF NI(I)=1 THEN 


460 


FOR J=3 TO 16:IF PEEK(I+J)<>34 




NI (I)=0:PRINT" [LEFT15]"BL$;BL$; 




THEN NEXT'KLUM 




:C0=C0-1' KEKG 


470 


N$(MX)="" :FOR K=J+1 TO 32 


700 


IF A$="R"THEN GOSUB 160:GOSUB 150 




:A=PEEK(1+K) : IF A=34 THEN 490'LAYR 




:G0TO 290'GNWH 


4 80 


N$(MX)=N$(MX)+CHR$(A) :NEXT K'EROM 


710 


IF A$="Q"OR A$=CHR$(27)THEN 


490 


NI (MX) =0:NEXT I:DCLOSE U{SD) 




1280'GMXI 




: RETURN 'ERQN 


720 


PRINT:NEXT: PRINT: PRINT 


500 


PRINT DS$:CLOSE 1:G0SUB 190 




:GOTO 660'FHOH 




:GOTO 440'ENBE 


730 


PRINT TAB (10) "[D0WN3] 


510 


GOSUB 535:DM=DK:Z1=0:Z2=3*FA-1 




COPY >>"CO"FILES: FROM 




:GOSUB 70: IF DR THEN RETURN 'KAOM 




>>"TY$(SF)", ON UNIT"SD 


520 


FOR Y=PB TO DM-1 STEP 32 




: PRINT TAB (29) " [DOWN] 




:IF PEEK(Y)<>229 AND 




TO >>"TY$(TF)", ON UNIT"TD'ECFY 




PEEK(Y+12) <F1 THEN GOSUB 200 


740 


PRINT TAB(25) ; :INPUT" [D0WN2] 




:MX=MX+1:NI (MX) =0 : N$ (MX) =F3$ ' TYYA 




OK <Y/N>";0$:IF 0$<>"Y"THEN 


530 


NEXT: RETURN 'CBXD 




630'HOUO 


535 


PRINT#F,"U0"+CHR$(10) : RETURN 'EHXL 


750 


DR=l:DK=CB:FI=2:F2=l:GOSUB 150 


540 


GOSUB 535:SYS 2816,DK/256 




:IF TF=4 THEN F2=2'JCUS 




:IF(PEEK(DK)AND 160)0160 OR 


760 


FA=F2:XF=TF:D=TD:F=3:GOSUB 120 




PEEK(DK+2)<>9 THEN 620'OLST 




:GOSUB 130:GOSUB 170 


550 


ZS=0:DM=DK:B1=64:TR=0 




:0N TF GOSUB 1150,1150,510,510, 




:FOR DZ=6 TO 9:G0SUB 100 : NEXT ' JCMQ 




540' JCLY 


560 


B1=80:FOR DZ=1 TO 3:G0SUB 100:NEXT 


770 


GOSUB 150: PRINT" [DOWN ] COPYING : " 




:DM=AD+512:IF DR THEN 590'KDBR 




:GOSUB 170:FG=0:FOR CX=1 TO MX 


570 


FOR I=PB TO DM-1 STEP 32 




:IF NI(CX)=0 THEN 820'KELX 




: IF PEEK(I)=0 THEN 590 


780 


FG=1:XF=SF:D=SD:F=2:F$=N$(CX) 




:ELSE IF PEEK(I)<>229 AND 




: IF SD=TD THEN GOSUB 120 




PEEK(I+11)<>8 THEN Y=I-1:G0SUB 200 




:GOSUB 170'KLLY 




:MX=MX+1:NI (MX)=0:N$ (MX) =F3$ "CKYM 


790 


DM=BU:PRINT F$;:ON SF GOSUB 840, 


580 


NEXT'BAEH 




840,890,890,10a0:IF M>TP THEN 


590 


ZS=0:DM=DM+256:B1=64:TR=0:ZS=0 




M=TP'INFX 




:F0R DZ=2 TO 3:G0SUB 100:NEXT 


800 


DM=BU:XF=TF:D=TD:F=3 




:DM=AD+512:BANK 0:FOR 1=0 TO 360 




:F$=NT$(CX)+BL$:IF SD=TD THEN 




;P=DK+3840+INT(1.5*I) "WPXM 




GOSUB 120:GOSUB 170'LQPT 


600 


IF I AND 1 THEN FACFl, 


810 


SYS 3420, {M+l)/256, 




I) =PEEK(P+1) *16+INT(PEEK{P)/16) 




M-INT( (M+l)/256)*256+l 




:ELSE FA(FI,I)=PEEK(P)+256*{PEEK 




:IF M>BU THEN PRINT" — > "F$ 




{P+1)AND 15) 'TVWW 




:0N TF GOSUB 870,87 0,930,930, 


610 


NEXT: RETURN 'CBXC 




1160'PGMA 


620 


PRINT: PRINT"THIS IS NOT AN MS-DOS 







COMMODORE MAGAZINE 1 1 1 



128 USERS ONLY/SUPERSWEEP 128 



820 



830 



840 



850 



86 



870 



880 



890 



900 



910 



920 



930 



940 



950 



960 



970 



980 



990 



1000 



1010 

1020 

1030 
1040 



1050 
1060 



1070 



NEXT CX:IF FG THEN ON TF GOSUB 
11 50, 1150, 107 0,10 70, 1220 'FGVN 

PRINT" [D0WN2] > DONE < " 

:GOSUB 190:GOTO 630'DIUL 

OPEN 1,SD,8,"0:"+N$ (CX) 

: IF DS=0 THEN 860'FUAO 

PRINT" [RVS] ERROR >> ";DSS 

:GOSUB 190:CLOSE 1:CL0SE 4 

:GOTO 820'FQVP 

SYS (SA(SF) ) ,BU/256,1 

:M=PEEKC2 50)+PEEK(2 51)*2 56:CLOSE 1 

: RETURN' J JRV 

OPEN 4,TD,8,"0:"+NT?{CX)+",S,W" 

: IF DS THEN 850'FUMS 

SYS (TA(TF) ) ,BU/256,4,M/256+l 

:CLOSE 4: RETURN 'GAET 

GOSUB 535:NB=0:NR=0 

:FOR Y=PB TO PB+F1*2040 STEP 32 

:GOSUB 200:IF F$<>F3$THEN 920'ONOD 

NR=PEEK(Y+15) : NB=PEEK ( Y+12 ) 

:FOR Z=16 TO 31 :B=PEEK (Y+Z) ' MCAR 

IF B THEN Z1=B*4*F1:Z2=Z1+4*F1-1 

;GOSUB 70:NEXT'LUQP 

NEXT Y:M=BU+NR*12B+NB*16384 

: RETURN 'HSON 

GOSUB 535:XE=0:FOR JJ=BU TO M-1 

STEP 16384*F2:GOSUB 1000:DM=JJ 

:FOR K=0 TO 15'NLPW 

Z1=ES (K+1) *4*F2:Z2=Z1+4*F2-1 

:IF JJ+K*1024*F2<M THEN GOSUB 110 

:NEXT:K=16'R0DC 

KR=INT({M-JJ+127)/128) 

; IF F2=l AND NR>128 THEN NR=128 

:ELSE IF NR>128 THEN 990'PNWB 

BANK 0:NB=K:DI=CB+32*DF:POKE DI,0 

:FOR 1=1 TO 11:P0KE DI+I, 

ASC(MIDS(F$,I,1) ) :NEXT'0QKC 

POKE DI+12,XE:F0R 1=13 TO 31 

:POKE DI+I,0:NEXT:FOR 1=1 TO NB 

:POKE DI+15 + I,ES (I) :NEXT'PNBD 

POKE DI4-15,NR:XE = XE + 1:NEXT JJ 

:RETURN'GRZT 

XE=XE+1:NR=NR-128: IF NR>128 THEN 

NR=128:GOTO 960:ELSE 960'KHQB 

DF=0:FOR 1=0 TO 16:ES (I)=0:NEXT 

:FOR 1=2 TO 169:FA(2,I)=0 

:NEXT'LHIG 

FOR 1=CB TO CB+2040*F2 STEP 32 

:IF PEEK(I)=229 THEN 1030'KYQF 

FOR J=16 TO 31:FA(2,PEEK(I+J) )=1 

:NEXT:DF=DF+1' JYMG 

NEXT: IF DF>64*F2 THEN 1060 'FLAB 

N=1:F0R 1=2 TO 169 

:IF FA(2,I)=0 THEN ES (N)=I 

:FA(2,I)=l:bi=N + l:IF N>16 THEN 

RETURN' PPLP 

NEXT'BAEX 

PRINT" [D0WN21CP/M DISK FULL" 

:GOSUB 1070:GOSUB 190 

:GOTO 630'ENQH 

DM=CB:Z1=0:Z2=8*FA-1:GOSUB 110 

:GOTO 170'HXAJ 



1080 GOSUB 535:F0R I=PB TO PB+3580 

STEP 32:IF PEEK(I)=0 OR 

PEEK(I+11)=8 OR PEEK{I+11)=16 OR 

PEEK(I)=229 THEN 1100'VSQY 
1090 Y=I-1:G0SUB 200:IF F$=F3$THEN 

1110'GRMJ 
1100 NEXT: RETURN 'CBXU 
1110 BANK 0:ZS=0:SC=PEEK(I+26)+PEEK 

(1+27) *256:M=BU+PEEK(I+28) +PEEK 

(I+29)*256'R0CP 
1120 SS= (SC-2)*2 + 12:GOSUB 1140 

:GOSUB 100:SS=SS+1:GOSUB 1140 

:GOSUB 100'KJCJ 
1130 SC = FA(1,SC) : IF SO360 OR SC<6 

THEN RETURN:ELSE 1120' lYNH 
1140 SI=INT( (SS-INT(SS/13)*18)/9) 

:DZ=SS-INT(SS/9) *9+l 

:TR=INT(SS/18) :B1=64 

:IF SI THEN B1=80'UAUX 
1150 RETURN 'BAQY 
1160 GOSUB 535:BANK 0:FOR Y=CB TO 

CB+3580 STEP 32:IF PEEK(Y)=0 OR 

PEEK(Y)=229 THEN 1170:ELSE NEXT 

:GOTO 1270 'ROFT 
1170 DR=Y:FOR J=10 TO 31:P0KE Y+J,0 

;NEXT:NC=5:G0SUB 1260:NC=J 

:LE=M-BU'MJMR 
1180 POKE DR+26,NC AND 255 

:POKE DR+27,NC/256 

:FOR DM=BU TO M-1 STEP 1024 'LHDQ 
1190 ZS=0:SS= (NC-2) *2+12:GOSUB 1140 

:GOSUB 80:SS=SS+1:GOSUB 1140 

:GOSUB 80'LLKS 
1200 GOSUB 1260:FA(2,NC)=J:NC=J:NEXT 

:FA(2,NC) =4095:BANK 

:FOR J=l TO ll'JPDJ 
1210 POKE DR+J-1,ASC(MID$ (F$,J,1) ) 

:NEXT:POKE DR+28 , LE-INT ( LE/256) 

*256:POKE DR+29, LE/256 

: RETURN 'QVVQ 

1220 DM=CB:ZS=0:B1=64:TR=0 

:FOR DZ=6 TO 9: GOSUB 80: NEXT 
:B1=80:FOR DZ=1 TO 3:G0SUB 80 
:NEXT'PPIP 

1230 BANK 0:DM=CB+3840:FOR 1=0 TO 359 
:P=DM+INT(1.5*I) ' KCTK 

1240 IF I AND 1 THEN POKE P,((FA(2, 
I)AND 15)*16)OR PEEK(P) 
:POKE P+1,FA(2,I)/16 
:ELSE POKE P,FA(2,I)AND 255 
:POKE P+1,FA(2,I)/256'RMWX 

1250 NEXT:ZS=0:B1=64:TR=0 

:FOR DZ=2 TO 3:G0SUB 80:NEXT:ZS=0 
:FOR DZ=4 TO 5:G0SUB 80:NBXT 
:G0T0 170'QOBS 

1260 FOR J=NC+1 TO 359: IF FAC2, 
J) THEN NEXTiGOTO 1270 
:ELSE RETURN 'KVWL 

1270 PRINT" [D0WN2] MS-DOS DISK FULL" 
:GOSUB 1220:GOSUB 190 
:GOTO 630'ENXL 

1280 WINDOW 0,0,79,24,1:SLOW:END'DPUI 

END 



112 MARCH '87 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS/JET AND SCENERY DISKS 



Ctmtimied from pfi. J2 

while not liindcring the pertbmiancc of 
your phinc. 

'IliL' g;inn: nindonily selects a group of 
tiirgcts before tlic Tiirget Strike chitllengc 
begins. Sevcnil riiglits iigo a certain fac- 
ton' in the sequence of structures on the 
ground was a tju^ct, Toniglit tlie same 
factor^' is just a p;irt of tlie scener\'. 

Hints 

My advice to new players is to learn 
how to recognize each t)pe of cneni}- 
;iireraft hy its shape. Tlien study tlie tech- 
niciil data available ti;)r each .MIG in tlie 
operating niiuuial and ob.ser\e their at- 
t:ick; strategies in tlie air. 'lliis rese;ureii 
should reveal possible enemy weak- 
nesses and help )ou formulate a metlnxl 
of dealing witli \our foes. 

As you pla\ tlie giime. keep a w^ttcliftil 
eye on die radar screen. If you detect ;in 
incoming suri;tce-to-air-niis.sile, whatc\er 
you do — don't p;mic. A clc\er ]->layer ^-ill 
automaticdly begin ;ui ev;isi\e maneu- 
ver. Sometimes you c;ui simply a\()id a 
missile by cliiuiging your lie;iding. And 
once in a wliile you may even get a 
glimpse of a missile coming toward you 
if your jet is pointed riglit. 

A wise pla\er will tly his lx)mbing mis- 
sions as low to the ground as possible. 
This strategy' m;ikcs it Iiard fiir tlie sur- 
face-to-air missiles to track you. 

Sooner or later one of diose little dc\-- 
ils will score a direct hit on )C)ur air ship. 
>X'lien tltis happens, the screen will begin 
flasliing red and the aircraft will start 
tumbling out of control. If you should 
find yourself in this deadly situation, 
eject from your plane, "^es, the pilot has a 
short period of time to abiuidon ship. A 
successfiji ejection before the aircraft 
crashes cams tlie pilot a new ]>lmic. "\ou 
can also eject e\en if tlie jet hasn't been 
hit. If you're flying along ;uid decide to 
eject, \'ou can watch tlie jet tl\' away be- 
low you :ls you hang h^)m your para- 
chute, "^bur only restriction is )OU can 
eject firom a plane only twice per game. 

Evaluation 

Tlie grapliics of Jet are simple but ade- 
quate. E^■e^\ tiling found on tlie control 
instrument screen is e\enl\' spaced ;ind 
eas\' to read. Unfortunately, objects in tlie 
air and things on tlie ground contain \-er\' 
few details. MKi's in tlie :iir resemble 
simple wire graphic images, while oil 
talks on tile gnjund are merch' shap)cs. It 
seems that the programmers tried to 



a\'oid accessing die dLsk once tlie main 
pnignim is loaded in. 

I was imprc-s.sed witli/e/s colors, ./efs 
creator kept tilings simple ta)- using blue 
fcjr the sky and \vater, green for the 
ground, black luid wliite for (jbjeet.s, and 
yellow for miscelliineous. Tie only ex- 
ception to tliis color scheme is when you 
take off from tlie c;irrier. Mere tlie occ-ui 
is green so you can tcLI the difl'erence be- 
tween sk],' :ind water. 

Sounds in tlie progt-am are g(Kxl, Tlie 
noise of die jet li;is tv\'o scp:irate \'oices. A 
rumbling sounti is ;ilwa)S diere. :ind as 
you modih- your tlirust, a hit^i-iiitched 
wliine lets \ou hear die incre-.tse luid de- 
crease of power. 

Scenery Disks 

llie Scener\- Disks were constructed 
from digitized .secttt)n;il maps. Sectional 
maps define :ui area hy di.s]-)laying niiuiy 
of tlie pliy.sic;il fc-aturcs of diat region, in- 
cluding airports, bodies of water and 
liigli\\ays. Some |>iloLs prefer iLsing scc- 
tion;il maps when they fl\' becau.se it's 
e-Lsier to navigate from one location to 
iinodier using die predoniin;uit features 
beneatli you as reference points. 

Stiblogic took die sectional maps dis- 
playing die L'nited States ;uid conden.sed 
about three of tlicm into each Scenery 
Disk. The entire continental United 
States is stored on 12 disks. Population 
was a major factor in dctemiining lio%\' 
m;uiy .square miles %\'ould fit on a single 
Scenery Disk, because die greater the 
jxipulation of an area, die moix- laiid- 
m;irks ;ind airports diere are. lliat ex- 
plains why large regions of the West c;in 
be stuffed onto one disk 

Several niglits ago 1 loaded in Scencr\' 
Disk #6, ftiiich covers a region contain- 
ing Onialia, Wichit;i ;uid Kiuisas C:it\-. In 
recent years. I have actually flown 
;tn)und the Quincy, Illinois, ;irea :uid I 
Wiuited to see how accurately Uiat loca- 
tion was depicted in die progr;im. I c;ui 
honestly say that the runwa\s of the 
Quincy airport ;ire properly displayed, 
widi several major liigliwa)-s to die ^^•est 
of tlie cit>- appeiuing correcth'. 

I ha\e also used die electronic navigsi- 
tionid iiids of die Scenen- Disk thing die 
Piper Archer from Fligbt Simulator 11. 
B:isically, these electronic na\'igational 
aids work well. 

'llie Sccner}' Disks are a lot of frin. 
Tliey contain major roads. airpt)rLs ;uid 
Ixxlics of water. Sublxigic is releasing a 
series of Star Disks for flying ;iround a 



smiiller region which will cont;iiii more 
lcK';il l;uidm:u"ks. 

In conclusion, a plus fbr/tV is die fact 
Uiat it's very tbrgi\ing of minor mistakes. 
In fact, r\e taken oft' from the grass sur- 
rtjiiiiding die runway several times lately. 
The programmer has also made this 
fliglit simulation less complicated and 
more enjoyable for the average comput- 
er iLser Most coasumcrs will enjo)" diis 
fliglit simulation more than odiers, be- 
cause it "was written and documented 
more with them in mind. 

On die odier li;uid,/ef lacks the editor 
nKxJe of die I'li^ht Siiniilaior 11. ^bu're 
forever cursed to thing cle;ir blue skies 
under ideal weather conditions. Jet's 
screen updating system could also use 
some impro\ement. As diings are, the 
\'iev\'ing .screen is slowly u]xiated during 
ever)- few seconds of flight. It really 
needs a smoodier updiiting system. 

After working with/er for m:uiy hours, 
Rimdy ;uid 1 Ixjtli agi'ee that the fliglit 
siimilation is cjuite entertaining. We both 
enjo\ed its combat missions, :uid 1 still 
find them ver\- challenging, I recom- 
mend/tY for ele\ en \-e:ir-olds and up. Q 




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BLUE READER 



Coiiliiiiivd friim fig. .J5 

read from or -n ritteii to even though tlie 
physical Icngtli of a sector varies from 
track to track. ComriKxlores GCR for- 
mat, on tlie otlier hand, pa\ji no attention 
to the index hole; iiistead, timing i.** hiui- 
dled by s\Ticlironization marks that die 
drive writes on each sector 

Because CP/M and MS-15CXS both cm- 
ploy IBM System-34 formatting, yon 
miglit tliink diat dieir disks would be in- 
terch;uigcable. No such luck. Tlic wa\' 
the (Mil is managed on the dusk differs in 
CP/M and MS-DOS. 

Fortunately, however, the Commo- 
dore 1 S~ 1 is really two {.lri\-es in one ;uid 
can recognize bodi CiC^R mid Systeni-34. 
Its ROM is such that the 1 57 1 can under- 
stand CPAl but not MS-DOS— wliich is 
\Nhy it c:in read and write Ka^pro and 
Osborne disks, but not IRM-l'C disks. 

What The Big Blue Reader does is 
over-write the 1571 ROM with instruc- 
tions tliat enable it to make sense of MS- 
DOS. Tlicn it cant recognize CP/M until 
it's reset, but tliat's hardh' cause for com- 
plaint — unless, of course, you'd like to 
exchange d:ita between CP/M and MS- 
DOS or Commodore disks. Q 



CHESSMASTER 



Conthmed from pg. 26 

strateg}- and — liopcfiilly — ie:im to apply 
tliese to your own game. Since Uic games 
have already been played — some of 
tliem hundreds of years agt) — die recrea- 
tion of diem is sT\-ift. 

You can re;dly leam alot from tlie doc- 
umentation, 'flic rules and playing of tlie 
game vi-;is pro\-ided by tlie I Inited States 
C^hess Federation, who also include widi 
tlie game a c;ird for discount member- 
ship. This section is well illustrated and 
eas\- to understiuid. Tlie txx)klet also fea- 
tures a historj- of chess, a section on 
world-chtss chess pla\ers, a histor\- of 
chess as playetl by macliines, Uic library 
of classic giimes contained on die Games 
disk, and a section on famous chess paih- 
lenis. Hopefiilh- it will get \-ou in tlie 
friinie of niintl to defeat die computer 
once and for all. 

But if you cant defeat tlie computer, 
you can always defeat a friend. Cbess- 
inastei' 2(XX) :illows )ou to ]>lay against a 
[XTson widi die ctMiiputer as judge, sig- 
niiling illegid mo\es and mates. 

Because Chessnuisler 2()()(> is vci^' so- 
phisticated, it supports mo\es forgotten 
or ignored b\' st)me versions of die game, 
such as CasUing, En Pas.s;int ;uid Pawn 
I^)motion, In Casding, which involves 
mo\ing x^\o pieces on one turn, desig- 
nating die mo\e for die King will cause 
die rook to automatically mo\e to his 
former place — but only if the computer 
decides die mo\'c is lcg:il at diis time. 
Don't tn' mi\'diing sneak\-. 

You may alM> choose to have die com- 
puter play ag:tinst itself \'o\\ could leam a 
bit by watching diis, but you'll probably 
find it to be a bit more interesting if you 
and a friend place side bets on die differ- 
ent colors and. ..well, never mind. Or 
radier dian pla\^ a friU giuue from st:irt to 
finish, you c;ui .set up the board with any 
classic chess problem or one of your 
own. iiiucii like tiiking o\er a gmie in 
progress. 

Cbessmaster 2(X)0 is a colortlil and ex- 
citing addition to die libr;ir\' of computer 
chess. Graphic representation is clear 
;md sharp ;uul die sound, while not nec- 
essary; can be made to come luid go at 
v\'ill. The documentation is interesting 
;uid informative, and die routines of 3-D 
perspective and board rotation, while 
dic}- ma)' not improve your g:inie. are 
most worthwhile. And cert:iinly. all of us 
at one time or iinodicr ha%c found tlie 
solution to a problem by stcpjjing back 
and viewing it from a different ;uigle. Q| 



SPITFIRE 



Continued from pg. 28 

caused a crack-up yet, I suspect Uiat as I 
accumulate more thing time, die g;une 
will grow less forgiving of my skjppy 
huidiiigs. 

In one sense, tlien, the built-in but 
undisclosed difficulty factors add a 
measure of excitement ;ind uncertaint)' 
to play. On die odier h;uid. die ntle- 
book's circumspection runs die risk of 
undercutting the satisfaction that 
comes v^ixh experience. A game which 
penalizes you witliout warning for ac- 
tions it pre\'iously allowed treads a fine 
line between challenge ;ind fhtstration, 

livers' game o{ Spitfire '40 begins 
slowly due to die necessit\' of t;iking off 
;ind climbing to the :iltitude of die Ger- 
m;ui tigliter phuie.s. Once you encoun- 
ter the enemy, however, the action 
.speeds up to a blur, Dogfiglits iire fast 
;md Icdial, ;md can literally end in die 
blink of an e^e. In fact, combat may be a 
shade tcx) dc"idly. -\ircraft in Spitfire 'iO 
never .sustain p:irti;d diunage — eiunn' 
figliters eidier sh(X)t )ou out of die skj' 
or miss completely. 'Ilie game dojs not 
give )'ou die cli;uice to paraclute to 
s;(fet>- out of a downed plane ar J a\-oid 
losing credit tor iuiy kills score J in die 
current mission, 

A more serious problem with S[)itfire 
'40 is die sense of s;uneness diat sets in 
lifter a dozen tliglits or so. Aldiougli Spit- 
fire pilots liistoricidly faced scver.d upes 
of Ciemi:in fighters and Ixjmbei's during 
the Battle of Britain, in the simulator 
your toe is limitetl to a single kind of 
figliter. the Mcssersclimitt 109. 'Ihe mis- 
sions also lack any distinct objectives. 
Your sole concern is improving your per- 
son;d score. Odier di;tii diat, you ;ire nev- 
er out to accomplish ;in\' particuhu- go;d, 
nor are you tr\'iiig to prevent die enemy 
planes finm fulfilling some design t)f dieir 
owTi, Each ne\\' mission essentiidh' be- 
come-s a repc'it of die previous tliglitL 
only die le\'cl of diflicidr\- ch;uiges. 

Ihe LinvarA'ing iiaaire of die missions 
in Spitfire '40 direatens to m;ikc even die 
dirills of combat .seem commonplace 
;ifter awliile, Tiie game's abilitv' to retain 
vour interest o\er die course oi repeated 
playings is ciuestionable. If die pursuit of 
personal glory prinidcs motivation ;uid 
challenge enougli, then Spitfire '40 will 
not disappoint you. Given time, liowever. 
it will not excite you much either. I 
woidd recommend it tor the no\'ice flyer 
who is just getting his wings. 



114 MARCH '87 



GNOME KIT 

Contliiiivcl froin fig. ,i'} 

provides are simple "ways to rename a 
disk ;md rename file names. This means 
you c;m rewrite each directly. For in- 
stance, if a program needs to be loaded 
using the I.OAD"name",8, 1 command, 
you coLild rewrite tlie name to include a 
,8.1: i)ftcr it and before tlie progr;uii tile 
identification. Thus, to properly load 
such a machine-language program, all 
you need to do is list die director)-, t\pe 
LO/VD over the block size iuid press RE- 
TURN. And presto, die program loads 
back into the s;une nicmor\- location it 
was sa\ed fhjm. 

llic disk tUcilit)- is a rciil lifcsa\cr when 
a voltage ,sliort:ige splats a set|iientl;il file 
or the disk is otherwise corrupted. A 
knowledgeable programmer could use 
die progntm to reconstruct die end of 
tlie ftle so it can be .sa\'ed. 

llie jirogrmn's comm;uid structure is 
simple ;uid direct, requiring )0U only be- 
gin each commimd witli a period fol- 
lowed by a one-letter command. .Vfter a 
repeating commimd is issued (like auto- 
matic numbering or dump to printer), 
the command is in ettect until it is eitlier 
c-anccUed or you hit a SmFfliE'irRN. 

Tile programs powerful commands 
I"\'c mentioned in this ^c\■ie\^■ only begin 
to describe die gold mine of program- 
mer aids Gnome Kit contains. I found the 
more I used Gnome Kit. the more help I 
could stiuccze out of each command, it's 
like a microwa\'e o\en — you tlon't know- 
how helpiiil it can Ix' until you u,se it. aiitl 
tlien you don't want to cook vvidiout it. 
The progi"<ini comes with :i 3H-page 
m;tnu;il containing examples and a quick 
reference card Several sample progrmns 
arc iilso stored on die prognim disk iuitl 
ser\'c ;ls a tutorial. Kira ,So(twiire will 
send a registered owner a duplicate 
disk for S5. You must also be a regist • 
ercd owner to receive phone support. 

Kira brought all the ver\ best pro- 
gramming ;uds together in Gnome Kit 
suid ser\-es them up in one compact eas\-- 
to-use ]iack:igc. 'Ihe kit is ideal for serious 
pR)gnuiiniers, w hedier no\icc or exper- 
ienced. If you'v e been losing sleep trac- 
ing bugs, hunting for villainous \-ariables. 
or reconstructing subroutines h)- hantl. 
\-ou need Giioiiw Kit — it's a [:in)gnun- 
mer's salvation. g 

Ed iVote: .As this ivi'ieiv uviil to pivss. 
seivral new features bad fKvn added to 
the 128 it'isioii: liASIC scyoiliitij, both 
fonrard and backward (Did a find-re- 
place option 



MASTERTRONICS 

Cnnlintieil froiu /ig, -i! 

sional appearance of the titled sword 

provides you witfi some offensi\'e punch, 
tenipt)nirily tnui.sfonning your character 
into a winged. in\ineible sujier-knight. 

Big Mac. a .\l;Lsterti'onic re-release of a 
piLSt favorite, follows die undercover ex- 
ploits of Agent 00"^ 3- 3. His mission: to 
infiltrate die arch enemy's power station 
;uid shut down its eiierg\- supply without 
being detectetl. liigliteeii dilferent ch:uii- 
lx.'rs ( screeas ) must be entered, crossed 
and cle-ared for die operation to be a suc- 
cess, liach roon-» is a unique visuiil puzzle, 
requiring a different strategic appniach 
for comjiletioii. i^layers widiout nenes of 
steel need not apply. 

For those who cnjov- space games. 
One Man and His Dmid and Sontcira- 
qaeous ;ire riglit in your orbit. 'Ilie first is 
;ui uiiLisuitl outer space roundup \\ here 
die plaver must corriil luid capture ;ui 
alien form of sheep called nunboids. 'Ilie 
wrangling is performed b\' a joystick- 
controlled droid, who c;ui tuimel, th- ;md 
dig hLs way ;iround die herd in ;in at- 
tempt to get tliem to niaiket. 'Ilie unfa- 
mili;>r g;mie objective and uncommon 
control structure ma)' t;ike a littie getting 
used to, but t)nce you've played it. v'ou 
won't want to put it down. 

Nonterraqiieotis is a scarch-and-de- 
suioy epic diat spiuis tn'er 1 .000 screens. 
Plavers must batde wa\-e ;ifter wa\e of 
alien craft in an attempt to reach a t\ran- 
nical computer tliat has t;(ken mind con- 
trol over die inhabit;uit.s of \-our fiituristic 
pkuiet. It Is \m unaliLLshed sh(K)t-'eni-up 
tliat will give \-our trij^er finger ;ui ex- 
hausting workout. 

llie final package, ccjiitaining Kane 
and Human Knee, is a g;uiiing smorgius- 
l-x)rd. liach contest is actu;illy a comjiila- 
tion of sever.il short jtrcutle tesLs linked 
togctlier by a common theme. In Kiine 
you t;ike on die role of ;ui Old \ii| est shcr- 
ifl". .Surviving a dav' in die lile of a lav\-ni;ui 
will be a tough t;Lsk. as you will be iLsked 
to di-splay v'our adcptness at horse h;ui- 
dling, bow ;uid ;utow hunting ;uid .Main 
Street showdowns. 

Human Race traces m;m's 35-million 
year evolution in five dilfierent game's. Ev- 
en' po.ssihle reflex will be tested ;ls v'ou 
jump, climb, duck ;tnd tliLsli v'our way 
througli histor)'. But be wiinied: diis is 
one tough contest. Your progression 
dirough time will sureh- take time. But 
ever)- episode is solvable, so stick witli it. 

For dio.sc of you v\'hose giuning appe- 
tite is bigger di;ui your billfold. C;:uiie- 
v\-are's Tux} on One is a softw;ire oasis, m 



COMB 



Authorized Liquidator 



Commodore 64 

BUSINESS 

SOFTWARE 




A 4-pack of most needed software 
for efficient business operations! 

General Ledger 

• Has e general ledger options. 

• Provides 150 charl-of-accounts. 

• 1500 general journal transactions. 

• Maintains account balances for month, 
quarter and year. 

• Custom income statements, trial 
balances, full reports and more. 

Inventory Management 

• Tracking of 1000 inventory items. 

• Maintains perpetual inventor/ records. 

• Calculates use, reorders, cost 
averaging, etc. 

PayrotI 

• Provides 24 different payroll functions. 

• Calculates payroll and tax deductions. 

• Prints payroll checks. 

• Interfaces wilfi General Ledger software. 
Accounts Payable/Checkwriting 

• Combines tracking of vendor payables 
with an integrated checkwriting system. 

• IVIaintains master file, provides 
invoice listings. 

• Gives aging report by 30, 60. 90 days. 

• Interfaces with General Ledger software. 

90-Day Limited Factory Warranty. 

Mfr.Ust*ld9.80 

ENTIRE SET of 4 
Liquidation Price . . 

Kern H-2094-702S-059 Ship, hand: $4.00/se( 
NOTE: Also available by Individual titles. 
Phone for prices. 

Credit card cufltomertcan ordef by phonft, 

24 houn a day, ^^^B^ 

7 dayt B week. WSA (>*ni»c<rt1 

Toil-Free: 1-800-328-0609 

Salet outilde the 48 contJguouft slater are tubjecl to 
ipeclaJ condltloni. P)«bh call or write to Inquire. 



$39 



Hem H-2a94 



SEND TO: 

C.O.M.B. Direct Marketing Cerp. 

1405 Xenlum Lane N/Mlnneapolis, MN 55441-44S4 

Send Commodore Bualneas Software Set(8) Item H- 

2094-7025-059 ai S39 per set. plus S4 per set for stiip, 
handling, (Minnesota residents add 6% sales tax. Sorry, no 
CO.O. orders.! 

n My clieck or money order is enclosed. |No delays in 
processing orders paid by check.) 

Charge: □ VIM* D MasterCard. D American Express' 

Accl Nc ^ . Exp 1. 

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY 

Name 

Address 

City 



Phone L 

Sign Here 



C O M B C OIM B CIO M B 



GAME PROGRAMS 



HV UICHARD r DAU;Y AND SAIJ.YJ. DAUrV 



Convmdrum 

for the 
Commodore 64 

W cbstcr defines conundrum ;ls a puz- 
idc tliat is difficult or nciirly impossible to 
solve. Thus comes the name for this 
game. A quick glance at tlie gitnie's tie- 
tac-loe-like design ;uid the short list of 
rules makes diouglit.s of playing (lonuii- 
dnim ver\- deccpti\e. for \\hile die play- 
ing screen and the ailes for play are sim- 
ple, winning is not. If you arc challenged 
by ncarh' imp<is.sible puzzles, Uien til is 
jjuiie is for you! 

I'pon running this program, a title 
page Ls dispku'cd on die screen. Wlien 
you press RETLTLX, die screen ele:irs :uid 
a blue box di\'ided into nine sections ap- 
pe;in> on tlie screen, 'lliese sections ;u"e 
nunilx;red from one to nine lx:ginni[ig 
witli the upper lcft-h;ind section going 
from left to rigliL After a \er}- brief dela\ , 
each of diese nfrie sections is filled with 
color — citlier red or green. At tlie lx)t- 
torn of the screen is the t|uestion 
■WHICH ONE TO RliVHRSi:?" with a 
flashing checkerboard-pattern cursor 
next to it. 

To play, prc-ss a number key Ixmeen 
1 and 9. 'Hie computer will immediately 
reverse the color of the apjiropriate 
sections, so you don"t need to press 
RETURN to enter tlie number. 

The object of Conundrum is to haw 
all of tlie outside sections (sectioas one. 
two, tliree, four. sL\. se\en. eiglit, ;uid 
nine) colored green, witli die center sec- 
tion (section five) colored red. Die num- 
ber tiiat you enter informs tlie computer 
of which sextion you \\,mt die color re- 
versed. For example, il section nine is 
red. press tlie number 9 key, and it will 
become green. 

Hey. wait! Don't turn the page \et! 
Tliere's a little complication that you 
must consider as you are pressing keys to 
change colors. When you reverse the 
color of one section, other .sectioas are 




This puzzle is only for those who are 
stimulated by nearly impossible challenges! 



;ilso ■.ittected. For example, \\'hen you en- 
ter tile number 9 w;inting to rewrse iLs 
cokir from red to green, the color of sec- 
tions fi\e, sbi, and seven will :ilso be re- 
\'ersed. 'Iliis would Ix' helptiil when .sec- 
tion live is green and sections six :uid 
se\en ;ire red. but what if diey are ;dread\' 
die pn)per ccjlor!' 

lliere are three rules that apply to 
these color changes. \X hen ch;mging die 
color of c-ach of die tour comers ( sec- 
tions one, three, seven, and nine ), c-ach of 
the two adjacent sections plus tlie center 
section (section fi\-c) will ;ilso chiuige. 
For example, if you chcxjse to re\erse 
sectk)n diree. sections two, five and sbt 
\\ill also Ix: reversed. 

When changing the color of a section 
in tlie center of each side (sections t%\-o. 
four, six, :md eiglit), the adjacent comer 
sections v\'il! also be chiuiged. II' you en- 
ter die number 8, sections se\en :md 
nine will also be reversed. And when you 
select section fi-v-e, the positions adjacent 
to it (sections two, four, six. and eiglit ) 
will chiuige as well. 

Once \'OU ha\e mastered ConLindrum 



using tlie abo\e rules, you miglii wajit to 
exiieriment widi ni:iking up yt)ur o\\n 
rules for changing die colors. Hie code 
whicli controls the color changes is 
found in lines -130 to 510 of die pn)gnuii. 
N'lriable T contiiins die count of how 
miuiy sections are to be reversed T\"hen a 
p:irticul;ir section is chosen. Tlie values 
of R\'( ) ,s]X'citS- which sc-ctions diese :ire. 

Here is a helpftil hint tcj tliose who 
haw !x;come discouraged widi the nciir- 
ly impossible aspects of this g;uiie, Re- 
\erse sections %:> tliat die colors are ;ir- 
nuiged in a symmetriciil pattern. Tlien 
winning is a matter of onh' a few more 
ke\' strokes. .Simjile. riglit? 

it should be noted at this point that 
one of the Daleys under the byline of 
Rich;ird F D:iley and S;ill\- J. Didey has )et 
to win one giuiie! Imagine tlie eniotion;il 
duress under wtiieh tliis one Daley must 
work, tor luiv time die odier D;tley w:ui- 
ders by, the cry arises, "1 can't stand it!" 
iuid in only a few ke}-.strokes. the game is 
won. I often wonder what the Daley who 
;ilways wins wotild Icxik like widi a com- 
puter monitor ;ls a hat! Q 



Before nping this program, tad "How lo Enter Pro-ams" and "How to I'sc the Magazine 
Entn- Program." Tlie B.'^SIC programs in this magazine arc aailibic on disk from toidstar, 
P.O.Box 30007, Shrev-qwa U "1 1.^U-OOO". l-8()0-8}l-J694. 

Conundrvim 

180 PRINT " [CLEAR, D0WN4] ";TAB{11) ; 



"*** [RVS] CONUNDRUM [RVOFF] 
***"'CFAL 
190 PRINT "ID0WN3] ";TAB{19) ;"BY"'CFVH 
20i3 PRINT " [D0WN2J ";TAB(12) ; 

"RICHARD F. DALEY" 'CFQC 



ne MARCH '87 



GAME PROGRAMS/CONUNDRUM 






340 


REM "BARB 




210 


PRINT TAB(18) ;"AND"'CEWY 


350 


GOSUB 1020: PRINT'CFJE 




220 


PRINT TAB(13) ;"SALLy J. 


360 


WN = 0: GOSUB 580: IF WNO0 THEN | 




DALEY"' CEMD 




650'GORK 




230 


GN$= " [GREEN , RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , DOWN , 


370 


PRINT "[CYAN]WHICH ONE 


TO 




LEFTS , RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , DOWN , LEFTS , 




REVERSE? [SPACE6, LEFTS] ' 


1 . 




RVS , S PACE2 , RIGHT , SPACE2 , DOWN , 




: GOSUB 790'CFRQ 






LEFT 5 , RVS , S PACE 5 , RVOFF , DOWN , LEFTS , 


380 


IF VAL(KB$)<1 OR VAL(KBS)>9 THEN 




RVS, SPACES, RVOFF, UP4, RIGHT] "' BDBV 




PRINT "[UP2]": GOTO 370'JQMP 


240 


RD$= " I RED , RVS , S PACES , RVOFF , DOWN , 


390 


IF SQ(VAL(KB$) ) =1 THEN 






LEFTS , RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , DOWN , LEFTS , 




SQ(VAL(KB$) )=0: GOTO 410'HYXP | 




RVS, SPACE2, RIGHT, SPACE2, DOWN, 


400 


SQ(VAL(KB$) ) =1'CKIB 






LEFTS , RVS , SPACES , RVOFF , DOWN , LEFTS , 


410 


ON VAL(KB$) GOTO 430,440,450,460, 




RVS , S PACES , RVOFF , UP4 , RIGHT] " ' BDAW 




470,480,490,500,510'DPLI 


250 


RT$="[RIGHT11] ": DN$=" [DOWNS] 


420 


GOTO 3S0'BDHB 






"'CHCF 


430 


T=3: RV(1)=2: RV(2)=4: 


RV(3)=5 


260 


PRINT "[DOWN] PRESS [RVS] RETURN 




: GOTO 520: REM SQUARE 


I'GKLN 




[RVOFF] TO BEGIN" 'BADJ 


440 


T=2: RV(1)=1: RV(2)=3: 


GOTO 520 


270 


GET KB$: IF KB$<>CHR$(13) THEN 




: REM SQUARE 2'FDNL 






270'GOGJ 


450 


T=3: RV(1)=2: RV(2)=5: 


RV(3)=6 


280 


DIM SQ(9) ,RV(9) "BLSH 




: GOTO 520: REM SQUARE 


3'GKPP 


290 


PRINT "[CLEAR]": POKE 53280,0 
: POKE 53281, 0'DQOK 


460 


T=2: RV(1)=1: RV(2)=7: 

: REM SQUARE 4 ' FDTN 


GOTO 520 


300 


GOSUB 920: FOR CT=1 TO 9 

: SQ(CT)=0: IF RND(TI)>.65 THEN 

SQ(CT)=1'KGAK 


470 


T=4: RV(1)=2: RV(2)=4: 
: RVC4)=8: GOTO 520 
: REM SQUARE 5'HRXT 


RV(3)=6 


310 


NEXT CT'BCZY 


480 


T=2: RV(1)=3: RV(2)=9: 


GOTO 520 


320 


REM'BARY 




: REM SQUARE 6 ' FDAP 




■ 330 


REM *** MAIN LOOP ***'BOID 


490 


T=3: RV(1)=4: RV(2)=5: 


RV(3)=8 




THE AMAZING 

M)ICE MASTED 



ENJER 

JHE FINAL 

FRONflER 

OF 

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COMMUNICATIONS 

Thefe is nothing else iike 
it Voice Master gives 
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controls progroms. or home appliances, robots, and mofe with spoken 
commands. VertMl response back gives status, verifies, of requests your 
replyl Speech output ond recognition patterns ore recorded in with your 
voice. Or use the voice of your friend, boss, teacher, mother, even the 
family pet! Progro mm Ing issimple with new com monds added to BASIC. 
A music bonus program lets vou write and compose musical scores 
simply by humming the tune. Unlimited opplications for fun. education, 
and commercial use. Design your own programs for profit. Speech and 
recognition quality unsurpossed by even the nnost sophisticoted 
moch ines. Only Covox provides th is high-tech morvel ot a price less than 
most common peripherals 

The Covox Voice fvlaster coTies complete with all hardware and softwore 
for only S69.i?5. (Add iA shipping and handling for USA. S4 Canada. S10 
Qverseos.) Avoiloble for Commodore 64/1 28, Ajjple II, Ik, lie, lie, Atori 6ID0, 
SOOXL 130 XE. Specify when ordering. Viso, MasterCard phone orders 
occepted. 

Call or write for FSBE Vofce Matter Infopok 
and special comblnatlor} package otters. 

CXJNOX INC. DEPT. CM 

675-D Conger street • Eugene, Oiegon 97402 • U.S.A 
Area Code (503) 342-1271 • Telex 70601 7 (AvAJarm UD) 




tensoft 
presents 
The 
Amazing 

ARITH 




METICIAN 



For The Commodore 64" and 128'" 

"AT LAST a Math Game Kids Love to Play!" 

JOHNNY CAN T ADD? Suzy wishes She could outdo her 
friends in maih? They'll both improve fast with ARITHIVIETICIANI 
Here is a msih game' that kid's come back to — a game that 
quickly builds their arithmetic skills. 

If features continuous fully orchestrated music and animated 
cartoons, a wide choice of skill levels from single digit addition 
through seven digit long division, and plenty of incentives, 
rewards and surprises. All for an incredibly low S24.95. 

NO RISK—Cornplete satislaction or your money back. 
Order TODAY and begin improving THIS WEEK! 

Otart by tittore rotL rRE£ wBiVJWO* MittlrfCtrd iaO0SiS\S^ inCniitairM ZM t.S00-(i?6-61Z6 

a PieJwswKjiw AriBmnitunociUai i2tntKn 

rCaAro/ma res'oenis aaassseitt ra* ; 
C Se^ ^■REE mfoimaionfln^ D Cfetku money otOet efKtoxa ZZ Vaa C MasiHCa/d 



^count No 



- Eipkaoon OAVt 



City.Sute- 



S(niln«M>an.r.O.BaUf7I.SuOI<g<i,CA 92131 



Cc>T;mcKIWc lit dj iijdrttwt oT Convnatof EiKWaim LIJ 



D£AIER jrNlOUIRtES iKVIJ^D 



GAME PROGRAMS/CONUNDRUM 



500 

510 

520 

530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
580 

590 

600 

610 
620 
630 

640 
650 
660 



7'GKXT 
GOTO 520 

RV ( 3 ) = 6 



= 1 
IGMN 



670 



680 



690 



700 



710 



720 
730 

740 



: GOTO 520: REM SQUARE 
T=2: RV(1)=7: RV{2)=9: 
: REM SQUARE 8'FDBJ 
T = 3: RV(1)=8:. RV(2)=5: 
: REM SQUARE 9'FGSK 
FOR CT=1 TO T: IF SQ{RV(CT)) 
THEN SQ{RV(CT) )=0: GOTO 540' 
SQ(RV(CT) ) =1'BLDF 
NEXT CT: GOTO 350'CGPF 
REM 'BARE 

REM *** CHECK FOR WIN ***'BROJ 
REM'BARG 

FOR CT^l TO 9: IF SQ{CT)=1 THEN 
WN=WN+1' IRMQ 

NEXT CT: IF WN=8 AND SQ(5)=0 THEN 
WN=1: RETURN' IQFR 

IF WN=0 THEN WN=-1: RETURN'GHEF 
WN=0: RETURN'CEDD 
REM'BARC 

REM *** GAME OVER - DISPLAY 
WINNER AND EXIT ***'BKEN 
REM 'BARE 

J=0: IF WN=-1 THEN 750'FJCK 
PRINT "[L. GREEN, HOME, DOWN, RIGHT, 
SHFT M,SPACE2,SHFT N , DOWN , LEFT3 , 
SHFT M,SHFT N , DOWN , LEFT3] [CMDR M] 
[D0WN,LEFT3] [CMDR M] [RIGHT, UP3, 
RIGHT2,SHFT N , CMDR T,SHFT M,DOWN, 
LEFT3,CMDR G] [CMDR M] [DOWN, 
LEFT4,CMDR G] [CMDR M] [DOWN, 
LEFT4] "; 'BBHI 

PRINT "[SHFT M,CMDR @,SHFT N,UP3, 
RIGHT2,CMDR G] [CMDR M] [DOWN, 
LEFT4,CMDR G] [CMDR M] [DOWN, 
LEFT4,CMDR G] [CMDR M] [DOWN, 
LEFT4,SHFT M,CMDR @,SHFT N,UP3, 
RIGHT6] "; 'BBPD 

PRINT "[CMDR G,SPACE2,CMDR M,DOWN, 
LEFT4,CMDR G, SPACE2 ,CMDR M,DOWN, 
LEFT4,CMDR G, SPACE2 ,CMDR M , DOWN , 
LEFT4] "; 'BBZV 

PRINT "[SHFT M,SHFT N,SHFT M, 
SHFT N,UP3,RIGHT2,SHFT N,CMDR T, 
SHFT M, DOWN, LEFT3, CMDR G] [CMDR M, 
DOWN, LEFTS, CMDR G] [CMDR M,DOWN, 
LEFT3,SHFT M,CMDR §,SHFT N,UP3, 
RIGHT, CMDR M,SHFT M, SPACE3 , CMDR G, 
D0WN,LEFT6] "; 'BBYL 
PRINT "[CMDR M] [SHFT M,SPACE2, 
CMDR G, DOWN, LEFT6, CMDR M,SPACE2, 
SHFT M] [CMDR G , DOWN , LEFT6 , CMDR M, 
SPACES, SHFT M,CMDR G,UP3, RIGHT, 
SHFT -, DOWN, LEFT, SHFT -, DOWN, LEFT, 
SHFT -, DOWN, LEFT, SHFT W]"'BAHX 
PRINT " [H0ME,D0WN3] " ; DN$ ; DNS ; DN$ ; 
DN$;" [WHITE] DO YOU WISH TO PLAY 
AGAIN? ";:GOSUB 790'CWGP 
IF LEFT$ (KBS,1)="Y" THEN 290'EKAI 
PRINT " [CLEAR, L. BLUE] 
THANKS FOR THE GAME"'BABK 
POKE 53280,14: POKE 53281,6 
: END'DRAK 



750 



760 
770 

780 
790 

800 
810 

820 

830 
840 

850 

860 
870 

880 
8 90 
900 

910 
920 



930 



940 



950 

960 

970 
980 



990 
1000 



1010 
1020 

1030 

1040 
1050 



1060 



710'CVWU 



INPUT SUBROUTINE 



A, 



PRINT " [HOME, D0WN2, PURPLE] ";DN$f 
DN$;DNS;DN$;"HOW CLUMSY OF YOU! 
YOU LOSE!": GOTO 
REM'BARH 

REM *** KEYBOARD 
*** 'BEXQ 
REM' BARJ 

PRINT "[RVS,CMDR + , RVOFF , LEFT] " ; 
'BBOM 

GET KB$'BDGD 

IF KB$<>"" THEN IF ASC(KBS)<>13 
THEN PRINT " ": RETURN 'LLMM 
FOR CT=1 TO 40'DFDH 
GET KB$'BDGG 

IF KB$<>"" THEN IF ASC(KB$)<>13 
THEN PRINT " ": RETURN ' LLMP 
NEXT CT: PRINT "[CMDR +,LEFT]"; 
: FOR CT=1 TO 40'FKSN 
GET KB$'BDGJ 

IF KB$<>"" THEN IF ASC(KB$)<>13 
THEN PRINT " ": RETURN ' LLMS 
NEXT CT: GOTO 790'CGXM 
REM'BARL 

REM *** SUBROUTINE TO PRINT THE 
GRID ON THE SCREEN ***"BQQP 
REM' BARE 

PRINT DN$;RT$;" [UP3, BLUE, CMDR 
SHFT *,SHFT C,SHFT *3,CMDR R, 
C,SHFT *3,CMDR R, 
C,SHFT *3,CMDR S]" 
FOR J=l TO 2'FQRC 
CMDR Q,SHFT *,SHFT 
*3,SHFT -I-, SHFT *,SHFT C, 
*3,SHFT +,SHFT *,SHFT C, 
*3,CMDR WJ": GOSUB 980'CIRX 
J: PRINT RT$;"[CMDR Z,SHFT *, 
C,SHFT *3,CMDR E,SHFT C, 
*4,CMDR E,SHFT *,SHFT C, 
*3,CMDR X]": PRINT "[YELLOW, 
"DN$RT$" [DOWN] "; ' DODC 
FOR CT=1 TO 9: PRINT "[RIGHT2]"; 
CT;" [RIGHT] " ; ' EKXN 

IF CT/3 = INT(CT/3) AND CT09 THEN 
PRINT: PRINT " [D0WN5] ";RT$; 'LRMU 
NEXT CT: RETURN 'CDYL 

FOR CT=1 TO 5: PRINT RT$;"[SHFT -, 
SPACE5,SHFT -, SPACES , SHFT -, 
SPACES, SHFT -] " : NEXT CT 
: RETURN 'GNFX 
REM 'BARM 

REM *** SUBROUTINE TO DISPLAY 

CURRENT STATUS OF SQUARES 

***'BWUH 

REM 'BART 

PRINT " [HOME, DOWN] ";DN$;RT$;" 

[UP2,RIGHT] "; : FOR CT=1 TO 9 ' EPXC 

IF SQ(CT)=1 THEN PRINT GN$; 

: GOTO 1050'FQHC 

PRINT RD$; 'BEQX 

IF CT/3=INT(CT/3) THEN PRINT 

: PRINT " [D0WN5] ";RT$; " [RIGHT]"; 

' IPXH 

NEXT CT: RETURN 'CDYA 

EHU 



SHFT *,SHFT 

SHFT *,SHFT 

: GOSUB 980; 

PRINT RT$;" 

SHFT 

SHFT 

SHFT 

NEXT 

SHFT 

SHFT 

SHFT 

HOME] 



C, 



118 MARCH'S? 



'64 or '128 Software 

Take y our Rck! 



BASIC Compiler 

Complete BASIC compllsr 
and development package. 
Speed up your programs 3x 
to 35x. Compile to machine 
coda, compact p-code or 
both. A great package thai no 
software library stiould lae 
wittiout. '1Z8 version: 40 or 
80 col. monitor output and 
FAST mode operation, exten- 
sive 80-page prograiDmer's 
guide. C-S4 $39.95 

C-128 359.95 



Super C 

For software development or 
sct^ool. Learn thie C lang- 
uage on tlie '64 or '123. 
Compiles into last machine 
code. Combine M/L & C 
using CALL; 51 K avaiiable 
tor object code; Fast loading; 
Two standard I/O librarys 
plus math & graphic librariee. 
Added '128 features: CP/M- 
liks operating system; 60K 
FlAMdisk. C.64 S59.95 
C-12S $59.95 

\S&x^^°^ Spoedlorm 

Let your 64 or 128 commun- 
icate with the outside world. 
Obtain information from 
various computer networks. 
Flexible, command driven 
terminal software package. 
Supports most modems. 
Xmodem and Punter transfer 
protocol. VT52 terminal emu- 
lation with cursor keys, large 
45K capture buffer & user 
definable function keys. 
Contain* both vanlont 
C-64 & C-12S $39.95 



W&n 



Chartpak 

Create professional quality 
charts fast— without pro- 
gramming. Enter, edit, save 
and recall data. Interactively 
build pie, bar, line or scatter 
graph. Set scaling, latieling 
and positioning. Draw charts 
8 different formats. Statistical 
routines for average, standard 
deviation, least squares and 
forecasting. Use data from 
spreadsheets. Output to most 
pcinlers. C-64 $39.95 
0-126 $39.95 



BASIC 
Comoiler 




speeds up your BASIC programs by 
3 to 35 times. For C-64 and C-1 28 



C Language 

Compiler 

Learn the language of 
the 80's and beyond 
on your '64 and '128 







^CHARTPAW 



COBOL 

Now you can learn COBOL, 
the most widely used 
commercial programming 
language, on your 1 26 or 64. 
COBOL Compiler package 
comes complete with syntax- 
checking editor, interpreter 
and symbolic debugging 
aids. New '1 28 version works 
with 40/60 column monitors 
and is quicker than the '64 
version. C-64 $39.95 
C-128 $39.95 



..^^* 



^^e'' 



sjei- 



iUse your 64 or 128 to commun- k 
1; icate with the outside world 1 






■,.■.; \>0' . ;:;'■ 


:i; 


J ne source 
GEnle 
Dow Jonas 


::;S 


'^M 


,;:;:;,4iB^ 






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Complete system for devel- 
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Extensive editor. Standa/d J 
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RAK* disk; 1 0OK source/one 
drive or asOK/two; 80/40 
column. C-64 $59.95 
NbwI C-12S $59.95 

Cadpak 

Easy-to-use interactive draw- 
ing package for accurate 
graphic designs. Dimension- 
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scaled output to all major 
dot-matrix printers. Input viaj 
keyboard or lightpen. Twi 
graphic screens for COPYing 
from one to tlio other. DFIAW, 
BOX, ARC, ELLIPSE, etc 
available. Define your own 
library of symbols/objects- 
store up to 104 separate 
objects. C-64 S39.95 
C-128 $59.95 

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management system for the 
64 and 128, Manage stocks, 
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record taxable or non-taxable 
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reconcile each brokerage 
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the YTD transaction file; 
on-line quotes through Dow 
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any type of report needed to 
analyze a portfolio or 
security. C-64 $39.95 
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HUW TO ENTER PROGRAMS 



X he programs which appear in this 
magazine have been run, tested and 
checked for bugs and errors. After a 
program is tested, it is printed on a 
letter qualit>' printer with some for- 
matting changes. This listing is then 
photographed directly and printed in 
the magazine. Using this method en- 
sures the most error-free program 
listings possible. 

Whenever you see a word inside 
brackets, such as [DOWN], the word 
represents a keystroke or scries of 
keystrokes on the keyboard. The 
word [DOWN] would be entered by 
pressing the cursor-down key. If mul- 
tiple keystrokes are required, the 
number win directly follow the word. 
For example, [DOWN4| would mean 
to press the cursor-down key four 
times. If there are multiple words 
within one set of brackets, enter the 
keystrokes directly after one another. 
For example. ['dOWN,RIGHT2 ] 
would mean to press the cursor-down 
key once and then the cursor-right 
key twice. Note: Do not enter the 
commas. 

In addition to these graphic sym- 
bols, the keyboard graphics are all 
represented by a word and a letter. 
The word is either SHFT or CMD and 
represents the SHIFT key or the Com- 
modore ke>'. The letter is one of the 
letters on the keyboard. The combi- 
nation [SHIFT E] would be entered by 
holding down the SHIFT key and 
pressing the E. A number following 
the letter tells you how many times to 
t>'pe the letter. For example, [SHFT 
A4,CMD B3] would mean to hold the 
SHIFT key and press the A four times, 
then hold do'wn the Commodore key 
and press the B three times. 

The following chart tells you the 
keys to press for any word or words 
inside of brackets. Refer to this chart 
whenever you aren't sure what keys 
to press. The little graphic next to the 
keystrokes shows you what you will 
see on the screen. 

Syntax Error 

This is by far the most common 
error encountered while entering a 
program. Usually (sorr\' folks) this 
means that you have c\'ped something 
incorrectly on the line the syntax er- 
ror refers to. If you get the message 
"'Syntax Error Break In Line 270," 
type UST 270 and press RETURN. 



This will list line 270 to the screen. 
Look for any non-obvious mistakes 
like a zero in place of an O or vice- 
versa. Check for semicolons and co- 
lons reversed and extra or missing 
parentheses. All of these things wUl 
cause a syntax error. 

There is only one time a syntax 
error will tell you the wrong line to 
look at, If the line the syntax error 
refers to has a function call (e.g., FN 
A(3)), the syntax error may be in the 
line that defines the function, rather 
than the line named in the error mes- 
sage. Look for a line near the begin- 
ning of the program (usually) that has 
DEF FN A(X) in it with an equation 
following it. Look for a typo in the 
equation part of this definition. 

Illegal Quantity Error 

This is another common error mes- 
sage. This can also be caused b)' a 
typing error, but it is a little harder to 
find. Once again, list the line number 
that the error message refers to. 
There is probably a poke statement 
on this line. If there is, then the error 
is referring to what is trying to be 
poked. A number must be in the 
range of zero to 255 to be poke-able. 
For example, the statement POKE 
1024,260 would produce an illegal 
quantity error because 260 is greater 
than 255. 

Most often, the value being poked 
is a variable (A,X...). This error is tell- 
ing you that this variable is out of 
range. If the variable is being read 
from data statements, then the prob- 

H-|HOMEl--UNSHIFrED CUV HOME ^ [PURPLEI' -CONTROL 5 

n -ICLEABr-SHIFreDCLR/HOME Q IGREENl' - CONTROL 6 
R -[DOWN]" -CURSOR DOWN Q ■IBLUE]" =CONTH0L 



K ■■[YELLOWr-- CONTROL a 
n lORANGEr = COMMODORE 1 

(j ■•[BROWNl" -COMMODORE 2 
^■■|L RED!" -COMMODORE 3 

M -[GRAYir' = COMMODORE A 
Q ■■[aRAY2r=COMMODORE 5 

I!"|L GREENI"- COMMODORE 6 
fJ"[L BLUE1" = COMMODORE 7 

FJ ■■iGRAYai" -COMMODORE B 

GRAPHIC SYMBOLS WILL BE REPRESENTED AS EITHER THE LETTERS 
SHFT (SHIFT) AND A KEY dSHFT Q.SHFT J. SHFT D.SHFT S]") OR THE 
LETTERS CMDR (COMMODORE) AND A KEY ("[CMDR Q.CMDR 
G.COMDR Y.CMDR H)"). IF A SYMBOL IS REPEATED, THE NUMBER OF 
REPITITIONS WILL BE DIRECTLY AFTER THE KEY AND BEFORE THE 
COMMA ("fSPACES.SHFT S4,CMDR M2r') 



n"|UPl" -CURSOR UP 

II ■■IRIGHT1--CUHS0R RIGHT 
n ■■ILEFTl' -CURSOR LEFT 

R -IRVSI"' CONTROL 9 

I -[RVOFFI' "CONTROL 

III -[BLACKl' -CONTROL 1 
[1 ■IWHITEI" -CONTROL 2 

H ■1RED1= CONTROL 3 

n ■■[CYANr =C0NTR0L4 



iem is somewhere in the data state- 
ments. Check the data statements for 
missing commas or other typos. 

If the variable is not coming from 
data statements, then the problem 
will be a little harder to find. Check 
each line that contains the variable 
for typing mistakes. 

Out Of Data Error 

This error message is always relat- 
ed to the data statements in a pro- 
gram. If this error occurs, it means 
that the program has run out of data 
items before it was supposed to. It is 
usually caused by a problem or typo 
in the data statements. Check first to 
see if you have left out a whole line of 
data. Next, check for missing commas 
between numbers. Reading data from 
a page of a magazine can be a strain 
on the brain, so use a ruler or a piece 
of paper or anything else to help you 
keep track of where you are as you 
enter the data. 

Other Problems 

It is important to remember that 
the 64 and the PET/CBM computers 
will only accept a line up to 80 char- 
acters long. The VIC 20 will accept a 
line up to 88 characters long and the 
128 a line up to 160 characters long. 
Sometimes you will find a line in a 
program that runs over this number 
of characters. This is not a mistake in 
the listing. Sometimes programmers 
get so carried away crunching pro- 
grams that they use abbreviated com- 
mands to get more than the standard 
number of characters on one line. 



g -[Fir-Fi 

g ■■[F21--F2 

g"|F3|- = F3 
y ■|F4r = F4 

[J •|F5|- = F5 
H "IFBr-FS 

||'(r7|"=F7 
[| ■lF8r' = FB 

E] '[POUND]" -ENOUSH 
POUND 
□ ■!SHFT'r' = PI SYMBOL 

ro ■IT'' UP ARROW 



HOW TO ENTER PROGRAMS 



You can enter these lines by abbrevi- 
ating the commands when you enter 
the line. The abbreviations for BASIC 
commands are in your user guide. 

If you type a line that is longer than 
the acceptable number of characters, 
the computer will act as if everything 
is ok, until you press RETURN. Then, 
a syntax error will be displayed 
(without a line number). Many people 
write that the computer gives them a 
syntax error when they tj'pe the line, 
or that the computer reflises to ac- 
cept a line. Both of these problems 
are results of typing a line that has too 
many characters. 

Ihe Program Won't Run!! 

This is the hardest of problems to 
resolve; no error message is dis- 
played, but the program just doesn't 
run. This can be caused by many 
small mistakes typing a program in. 
First check that the program was 
written for the computer you are us- 
ing. Check to see if you have left out 
any lines of the program. Check each 



line of the program for typos or miss- 
ing parts. Finally, press the RUN/STOP 
key while the program is "rurming." 
Write down the line the program 
broke at and try to follow the pro- 
gram backwards from this point, look- 
ing for problems. 

If All Else Fails 

You've come to the end of your 
rope. You can't get the program to 
run and you can't find any errors in 
your typing. What do you do? As al- 
ways, we suggest that you trj' a local 
user group for help. In a group of 
even just a dozen members, someone 
is bound to have typed in the same 
program. Tlie user group may also 
have the program on a library disk 
and be willing to make a copy for you. 
For S9.95 per issue, you can also get 
all the BASIC programs in each issue, 
as well, from Loadstar, P.O. Box 
30007, Shreveport, LA 71 130-0007. 

If you do get a working copy, be 
sure to compare it to your own ver- 
sion so that you can learn from your 



errors and increase your understand- 
ing of programming. 

If you live in the country, don't 
have a local user group, or you simply 
can't get any help, write to us. If you 
do write to us, include the following 
information about the program you 
are having problems with: 
The name of the program 
The issue of the magazine it was in 
The computer you are using 
Any error messages and the line 

numbers 
Anything displayed on the screen 
A printout of your listing (if 

possible) 
All of this information is helpful in 
answering your questions about why 
a program doesn't work. A letter that 
simply states "I get an error in line 
250 whenever I run the program" 
doesn't give us much to go on. Send 
your questions to: 

Commodore Magazines 

1200 Wilson Drive 
West Chester, PA 19380 
ATTN; Program Problem Q 



HOW TO USE THE MAGAZINE ENTRY PROGRAMS 



J. he Magazine Entry Programs on 
the next pages are two BASIC ma- 
chine language programs that will as- 
sist you in entering the programs in 
this magazine correctly. There are 
versions for both the Commodore 64 
and the Commodore 128. Once the 
program is in place, it works its magic 
without you having to do anything 
else. The program will not let you 
enter a line if there is a typing mistake 
on it, and better yet, it identifies the 
kind of error for you. 

Getting Started 

Type in the Magazine Entry Pro- 
gram carefully and save it as you go 
along (just in case). Once the whole 
program is typed in, save it again on 
tape or disk. Now RUN the program. 
The word POKING will appear on the 
top of the screen with a number. The 
number will increment from 49152 
up to 49900 (4864-5545 on the 128) 
and just lets you know that the pro- 
gram is running. If everything is ok, 
the program will finish running and 
say DONE. Then t>pe NEW. If there is 
a problem with the data statements, 



the program will tell you where to 
find the problem. Otherwise the pro- 
gram will say "mistake in data state- 
ments." Check to see if commas are 
missing, or if you have used periods 
instead of commas. Also check the 
individual data items. 

Once the program has run, it is in 
memor)' ready to go. To activate the 
program type SYS49152 (SYS4864 on 
the 128), and press RETURN. You are 
now ready to enter the programs 
from the magazine. To disable the En- 
try Program, just type KILL (RETURN) 
on the 64 or SYS4867 on the 128. 

The checksums for each line arc 
the same for both the 64 and 128. so 
you can enter your 64 programs on 
the 128 if you'd like. 

Typing the Programs 

All the BASIC program listings in 
this magazine that are for the 64 or 
128 have an apostrophe followed by 
four letters at the end of the line (e.g., 
'ACDF). If you plan to use the Maga- 
zine Entry Program to enter your pro- 
grams, the apostrophe and letters 
should be entered along with the 



rest of the line. This is a checksum 
that the Magazine Entry Program uses. 

Enter the line and the letters at the 
end and then press RETURN, just as 
you normally would. 

If the line is entered correctly, a 
bell is sounded and the line is entered 
into the computer's memory (with- 
out the characters at the end). 

If a mistake was made while enter- 
ing the line, a noise is sounded and an 
error message is displayed. Read the 
error message, then press any key to 
erase the message and correct the 
line. 

IMPORTANT 

If the Magazine Entry Program sees 
a mistake on a line, it does not enter 
that line into memory. This makes it 
impossible to enter a line incorrectly. 

Error Messages and 
What They Mean 

There are five error messages that 
the Magazine Entr>' Program uses. 
Here they are, along with what they 
mean and how to fix them. 

Continued next page 



HOW TO USE THE MAGAZINE ENTRY PROGRAMS 



NO CHECKSUM: This means that 
you forgot to enter the apostrophe 
and the four letters at the end of the 
line. iMove the cursor to the end of 
the line you just typed and enter the 
checksum. 

QUOTE: This means that you for- 
got (or added) a quote mark some- 
where in the line. Check the line in 
the magazine and correct the quote. 

KEYWORD: This means that you 
have either forgotten a command or 
spelled one of the BASIC keywords 
(GOTO, PRINT. . ) incorrectly. Check 



the line in the magazine again and 
check your spelling. 

# OF CHARACTERS: This means 
that you have either entered extra 
characters or missed some characters. 
Check the line in the magazine again. 
This error message will also occur if 
you misspell a BASIC command, but 
create another keyword in doing so. 
For example, if you misspell PRINT as 
FRONT, the 64 sees the letter P and 
R, the BASIC key^'ord ON and then 
the letter T. Because it sees the 
keyword ON, it thinks you've got too 



many characters, instead of a simple 
misspelling. Check spelling of BASIC 
commands if you can't find anything 
else wrong. 

UNIDENTIFIED: This means that 
you have either made a simple spell- 
ing error, you typed the wrong line 
number, or you typed the checksum 
incorrectly, Spelling errors could be 
the wrong number of spaces inside 
quotes, a variable spelled wrong, or a 
word misspelled. Check the line in 
the magazine again and correct the 
mistake. n 



MAGAZINE ENTRY PROGRAM-64 



20 

30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 



100 



110 



Tlie .Magazine Emn' Programs arc arailable on disk, along with Uic other 10 25 
programs in ihis magazine, for 49.95. To order, contact I.oa(lst3i at i -800-83 1-2694. 1026 

10 PRINT" (CLEAR] POKING -"; 1027 

P=49152 :REM $C000 (END AT 1028 

49900/SC2EC) 18129 

READ A$:IF AS="END"THEN 110 1030 

L=ASC(MID$ (A$,2,l) ) 1031 

H=ASC(MID$ (A$,l,l) ) 11332 

L=L-48:IF L>9 THEN L=L-7 1033 

H=H-48:IF H>9 THEN H=H-7 1034 

PRINT" [HOME, RIGHT12] "P; 1035 

IF H>15 OR L>15 THEN PRINT 1036 

:PRINT"DATA ERROR IN LINE"; 1037 

1000-HNT( (P-49152)/8) :STOP 1038 

B = H*16 + L:P0KE P, B : T = T-t-B: P=P-H 1039 

:GOTO 30 1040 

IF TO86200 THEN PRINT 1041 

:PRINT"MISTAKE IN DATA — > CHECK 1042 

DATA STATEMENTS": END 1043 

PRINT"DONE":END 1044 

4C,1F, 00,00,00,00, 00, 00 1045 

00,00,00,00,00,00,00,21 1046 

C1,27,C1,2F,C1,3F,C1,4C 1047 

C1,EA,EA,EA,4C,54,C0,A2 1048 

05,BD,19,C0,95,73,CA,10 1049 

F8,60,60,A0,03,B9,00,02 1050 

09, 04, CI, 00, F5, 88, 10, F5 1051 

A0,05,B9,A2,E3,99,73,00 1052 

38, 10, F7,A9, 00, 80,13,04 1053 

4C,EF,C0,E6,7A,D0,02,E6 1054 

7B,4C,79,00,A5,9D,F0,F3 1055 

A5,7A,C9,FF,D0,ED,A5,7B 1056 

C9,01,D0,E7,20,2B,C0,AD 1057 

00, 02, 20, 74, C0, 90, DC, A0 1058 

00,4C,A9,C1,C9,30,30,06 1059 

C9,3A,10,02,38,60,18,60 1060 

C8,B1,7A,C9,20,D0,03,C8 1061 

D0,F7,B1,7A,60,18,C8,B1 1062 

7A,F0,37,C9,22,F0,F5,6D 1063 

03,C0,8D,03,C0,AD,04,C0 1064 

69,00,8D,04,C0,4C,8E,C0 1065 

18,6D,05,C0,8D,05,C0,90 1066 

03,EE,06,C0,EE,09,C0,4C 1067 

CS,Cl,18,6D,08,C0,8D,0e 1068 

C0,90,03,EE,07,C0,EE,0A 1069 



120 

1000 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1005 

1006 

1007 

1308 

1309 

1010 

1011 

1012 

1313 

1014 

1315 

1016 

1317 

1318 

1019 

1020 

1021 

1022 

1023 

1024 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



DATA 


00 


,60 


0A 


,A8 


,B9 


,0F 


,00, 


DATA 


FB 


rB9 


10 


00 


,85 


rFO 


A0, 


DATA 


A9 


rl2 


,20 


02 


,FF 


,B1 


,FB, 


DATA 


06 


,20 


D2 


FF 


,08 


00 


F6, 


DATA 


EC 


,02 


,20 


E4 


,FF 


,F0 


,FB, 


DATA 


18 


,B9 


0S 


01 


,20 


02 


FF, 


DATA 


10 


,F7 


68 


68 


,A9 


00 


80, 


DATA 


02 


,40 


74 


A4 


,4B 


49 


40, 


DATA 


91 


,91 


0D 


20 


20 


20 


20, 


DATA 


20 


,20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20, 


DATA 


20 


,20, 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20, 


DATA 


00 


51. 


55 


4F 


54 


45 


00, 


DATA 


45 


59 


57 


4F 


52 


44 


00, 


DATA 


20 


4F, 


46 


20 


43, 


48 


41, 


DATA 


41 


43, 


54 


45 


52, 


53 


00, 


DATA 


4E 


49, 


44 


45 


4E, 


54 


49, 


DATA 


49 


45, 


44 


00 


4E, 


4F 


20, 


DATA 


48 


45, 


43 


4B 


53, 


55 


40, 


DATA 


C8 


Bl, 


7A 


00 


FB, 


84 


FD, 


DATA 


09 


10, 


03 


40 


84, 


01 


88, 


DATA 


88 


88, 


88 


Bl 


7A, 


09 


27, 


DATA 


13 


A9, 


00 


91 


7A 


08 


A2, 


DATA 


Bl 


7A, 


90 


30 


03, 


08 


E8, 


DATA 


04 


00, 


F5 


60 


A9, 


04 


40, 


DATA 


C0 


A0, 


00 


B9 


00 


02 


99, 


DATA 


03 


F0, 


F0 


08 


D0 


F5 


A0, 


DATA 


B9 


40, 


03 


F0 


E6, 


99 


00, 


DATA 


C8 


D0, 


F5 


20 


96 


01 


40, 


DATA 


02 


A0 


09 


A9 


00 


99 


03, 


DATA 


8D 


,30 


03 


88 


,10 


F7 


A9, 


DATA 


85 


,02 


A0 


00 


,20 


58 


01, 


DATA 


89 


01 


20 


ED 


,01 


,E6 


7A, 


DATA 


7B 


,20 


70 


A5 


,A0 


,00 


20, 


DATA 


00 


,F0 


00 


24 


,02 


,F0 


,06, 


DATA 


A8 


,00 


,40 


,CE 


,01 


,C9 


,22, 


DATA 


06 


,20 


,80 


,00 


,40 


,0E 


,01, 


DATA 


BA 


,00 


,40 


,0E 


,01 


,A0 


,00, 


DATA 


00 


,02 


,20 


,74 


,00 


,08 


,90, 


DATA 


18 


, 6D 


,07 


,C0 


, 8D 


,07 


,00, 


DATA 


EF 


,01 


,88 


,A2 


,00 


,B9 


,00, 


DATA 


9D 


,00 


,02 


,F0 


,04 


,E8 


,08, 


DATA 


F4 


,60 


,18 


,AD 


,09 


,00 


,69, 


DATA 


8D 


,09 


,00 


,38 


,AD 


,0A 


,00, 


DATA 


19 


,90 


,06 


,8D 


,0A 


,00 


,40, 


DATA 


02 


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,0A 


,00 


,69 


,41 


,8D, 



,03 
,00 

,F0 
,20 
,A0 
,88 
,00 
,40 
,20 
,20 
,91 
,43 
,23 
,52 
,55 
,46 
,43 
,00 
,00 
,88 
,00 
,00 
,E0 
,CA 
,40 
,00 
,02 
,12 
,00 
,80 
,20 
,E6 
,80 
,40 
,D0 
,20 
,B9 
,0A 
,40 
,02 
,D0 
,41 
,E9 
,10 
,0A 



1070 DATA C0,AD,03,C0,6D,05,C0,48 


1082 


DATA 


CD,3E,0 3,O0,0E,AD,0C,C0 


1071 DATA AD,04,C0,6D,06,C0,8D,0C 


1083 


DATA 


CD,3F,03,O0,06,20,CC,C2 


1072 DATA C0,68,6D,08,C0,8D,0B,C0 


1084 


DATA 


4C,4B,C0,98,4a,68,4C,CA 


1073 DATA AD,0C,C0,6D,07,C0,8D,0C 


1085 


DATA 


C0,A9, 20, 80, 00, 04,80,01 


1074 DATA C0,38,E9,19,90,06,8D,0C 


1086 


DATA 


D4,A9,09,8D,05,D4,A9,0F 


1075 DATA C0,4C,52,C2,AD,0C,C0,69 


1087 


DATA 


8O,18,D4,60,20,A9,C2,A9 


1076 DATA 41,8D,0C,C0,AD,0B,C0,E9 


1088 


DATA 


81,20,OF,C2,A9,80,20,DF 


1077 DATA 19,90,06,8D,0B,C0,4C,67 


1089 


DATA 


C2,4C,O9,C2,20,A9,C2,A9 


1078 DATA C2,AD,0B,C0,69,41,8D,0B 


1090 


DATA 


11,20,OF,C2,A9,10,20,DF 


1079 DATA C0,A0,01,AD,09,C0,CD,3C 


1091 


DATA 


C2,A9,00,8O,04,O4,60,8D 


1080 DATA 03,D0,20,C8,AD,0A,C0,CD 


1092 


DATA 


04, 04, A2, 70, A0, 00, 88, 00 


1081 DATA 3D,03,D0,17,C8,AD,0B,C0 


1093 


DATA 


FD,CA,D0,FA,60,END IWD 


MAGAZ NE ENTRY PROGRAM 


-128 




5 TRAP 200 


1036 


DATA 


43, 54, 45, 52, 53, 00, 55, 4E 


10 PRINT" [CLEAR] POKING -"; 


1037 


DATA 


49, 44, 45, 4E, 54, 49, 46, 49 


20 P=4864 :REM $1300 (END AT 


1038 


DATA 


45,44,00,4E,4F,20,43,48 


5545/$15A9) 


1039 


DATA 


45, 43, 43,53,55, 40, 00, C8 


30 READ A$:IF A$="END"THEN 110 


1040 


DATA 


B1,3D,D0,FB,C0,09,10,03 


80 PRINT" [HOME, RIGHT12] "P; 


1041 


DATA 


4C, 69, 14, 88, 88, 88, 88, 88 


100 B=DEC(A$) :POKE P ,B : T=T+B : P=P+1 


1042 


DATA 


B1,3D,C9,27,D0,13,A9,00 


:G0TO 30 


1043 


DATA 


91,3D,C8,A2,00,B1,3D,9D 


110 IF T059314 THEN PRINT 


1044 


DATA 


00,0B,C8,E8,E0,04,O0,F5 


:PRINT"MISTAKE IN DATA — > CHECK 


1045 


DATA 


60,4C,5C,15,4C,C5,14,A0 


DATA STATEMENTS": END 


1046 


DATA 


09, A9, 00, 99, 06, 13, 80, 00 


120 PRINT"DONE":END 


1047 


DATA 


0B,83,10,F7,A9,80,85,FD 


200 PRINT:PRINT"DATA ERROR IN LINE"; 


1048 


DATA 


A0,00,20,3F,14,20,AE,14 


1000 + INT( (P-4864)/8) : END 


1049 


DATA 


20,00,43,84 , FA, A0,FF, 20 


1000 DATA 4C,1E,13,4C,3A,13,00,00 


1050 


DATA 


67,13,F0,O8,24,FO,F0,06 


1001 DATA 8E, 00, F7, 00, 42, 41, 51, 57 


1051 


DATA 


20,8F,13,4C,8F,14,C9,22 


1002 DATA 0D, 00, 00,43,08, 14, 0E, 14 


1052 


DATA 


D0,06,20,74,13,4C,8F,14 


1003 DATA 16, 14, 26, 14, 33, 14, A9, 00 


1053 


DATA 


20,9F,13,4C,8F,14,A0,00 


1004 DATA 3D, 00, FF, AD, 04, 03,80,12 


1054 


DATA 


B9,00,02,20,5B,13,C8,90 


1005 DATA 13, AD, 05, 03, 8D, 13, 13, A2 


1055 


DATA 


0A,18,6O,0A,13,8O,0A,13 


1006 DATA 4A,A0,13,8E,04,03,8C,05 


1056 


DATA 


4C, 60,14,88, 60, 18, AD, 0C 


1007 DATA 03, 60, AD, 12, 13, 80,04,03 


1057 


DATA 


13, 69, 41, 80, 0C, 13, 38, AD 


1008 DATA AO, 13,13,80, 05,03,60,6c 


1058 


DATA 


0D,13,E9,19,90,06,8D,0D 


1009 DATA 12,13,A5,7F,D0,F9,AD,00 


1059 


DATA 


13,4C,CF,14,AD,0D,13,69 


1010 DATA 02,20,5B,13,90,F1,A0,00 


1060 


DATA 


41, 80,00,13, AD, 06, 13, 50 


1011 DATA 4C,6F,14,C9,30,30,06,C9 


1061 


DATA 


08, 13, 48, AD, 07, 13, 60, 09 


1012 DATA 3A, 10, 02, 38, 60, 18, 60, C8 


1062 


DATA 


13,8D,0F,13,68,6D,06,13 


1013 DATA B1,3O,C9,20,D0,03,C8,D0 


1063 


DATA 


8O,0E,13,AD,0F,13,6D,0A 


1014 DATA f7,Bl,3D,60,18,C8,Bl,3D 


1064 


DATA 


13,8D,0F,13,38,E9,19,90 


1015 DATA F0,35,C9,22,F0,F5,6D,06 


1065 


DATA 


06,8D,0F,13,4C,05,15,AD 


1016 DATA 13, 80, 06, 13, AD, 07, 13, 69 


1066 


DATA 


0F, 13, 69, 41, 80, 0F, 13, AD 


1017 DATA 00, 80,07,13, 40,75,13, 18 


1067 


DATA 


0E,13,E9,19,90,06,8D,0E 


1018 DATA 60,08,13,80,08,13,90,03 


1068 


DATA 


13,4C,1A,15,AD,0E,13,69 


1019 DATA EE,09,13,EE,0C,13,60,18 


1069 


DATA 


41,8D,0E,13,A0,01,AO,0C 


1020 DATA 60, 0B, 13, 80, 0B, 13, 90, 03 


1070 


DATA 


13, CD, 00, 0B, 00, 20, C8, AD 


1021 DATA EE,0A,13,EE,0D,13,60,0A 


1071 


DATA 


0D,13,CD,01,0B,D0,17,C8 


1022 DATA A8,B9,14,13,85,FB,B9,15 


1072 


DATA 


AD,0E,13,CD,02,0B,D0,0E 


1023 DATA 13,85,FC,A0,00,8C,00,FF 


1073 


DATA 


AD, 0F, 13, CD, 03, 06,00,06 


1024 DATA A9,12,20,D2,FF,B1,FB,F0 


1074 


DATA 


20, 89, 15, A4, FA, 60, 98, 48 


1025 DATA 06,20,D2,FF,C8,D0,F6,20 


1075 


DATA 


68,4C,AF,13,A9,04,4C,AF 


1026 DATA 79,15,20,A3,15,20,E4,FF 


1076 


DATA 


13,A9,00,8D,00,FF,A9,20 


1027 DATA F0,FB,A0,1B,B9,EF,13,20 


1077 


DATA 


8O,00,D4,8D,01,D4,A9,09 


1028 DATA D2,FF,88,10,F7,68,68,A9 


1078 


DATA 


8O,05,D4,A9,0F,8D,18,D4 


1029 DATA 00, 80, 00, 02, 4C, 87,40,91 


1079 


DATA 


60, 20, 61, 15, A9, 81, 20, 9C 


1030 DATA 91,00,20,20,20,20,20,20 


1080 


DATA 


15,A9,80,20,9C,15,4C,96 


1031 DATA 20,20,20,20,20,20,20,20 


1081 


DATA 


15, 20, 61, 15, A9, 11, 20, 9C 


1032 DATA 20,20,20,20,20,20,91,00 


1082 


DATA 


15,A9,10,20,9C,15,A9,00 


1033 DATA 51, 55, 4F, 54,45,00,46,45 


1083 


DATA 


80, 04, 04, 60, 80, 04, 04, A2 


1034 DATA 59, 57, 4F, 52, 44, 00, 23, 20 


1084 


DATA 


7 0,A0,00,88,O0,FD,CA,D0 


1035 DATA 4F, 46, 20, 43, 48, 41, 52, 41 


1085 


DATA 


FA, 60, END iiio 



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124 MARCH '87 



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SILICON VALLEY INSIDER 



Continued from pg. 16 

there will be an upgrade path for current 
owners, but that the upgrade policy has not 
yet been set. 

Master Designer Software hss licensed 
the rights to use the Maix Brothers and 
Commander Cody in new games under pro- 
duction for the Amiga. No release dates or 
other information was available yet, but 111 
keep you posted. 

UJndscape has released The Perfect Col- 
lege for the 64. This is a database program 
containing information on over 1,650 accre- 
dited four-year U.S. colleges and universities. 
The user selects criteria such as location, cost 
and academic interest (tvrenty-six elements 
total), and the program searches out all 
schools that fit the proffle, All results can be 
printed out, and the database information is 
updated annually. 

Also from Mlndjscape Is Balance of Pow- 
er for the Amiga Tnis Is an educational game 
that asks the question "Eaw can two super- 
powers co-exist in a world without starting 
World War HI." It is a complex simulation of 
geo-politics— not a war game— where the 
player quickly fmds that hardball stances 
lead to thermonuclear destruction. The goal is 
to keep the world in one piece, while gaining 




Balance of Power 

world prestige using diplomacy— military 
aid, treaties, military advisors, troops, covert 
destabillzation, and poUtical pressure. 

The game is played over a period of eight 
years, with the U.S. and U.S,SE. alternating 
action each year. The goal is to build the high- 
est prestige, and the side with the greatest 
prestige at the end of the game wins. 

For a deeper understanding of the underly- 
ing philosophy of the game, I recommend 
reading the book of the same name, published 
by Microsoft Press. The author explains the 
theory of game design gives a history of the 
development of the game, and explains the 
strategies required to play the game without 
it ending in a war. 



ITewTek is releasing Di^alnt, a paint 
program for the Amiga It includes brushes, 
cut-and-paste routines, and other basic paint 
program functions. It has the ability to modi- 
iy a single pixel's color without a ripple effect 

Also coming is an upgrade to the Bi|lView 
software. Additions include a 640 X 200 
mode, an eight-color palette routine, a 20-sec- 
ond slow scan mode that dramatically im- 
proves resolution, and new software routines 
that improves results of a color video camera. 

Westcom InduBtrles has finished their 
hard disk backup program for the Amiga, 
Called HardHat, it gives the user several 
backup options; full disk, incremental, direc- 
tory, or single file. AE data stored on floppy is 
compressed for reduced space requirements. 
You may include a list of filenames to be ig- 
nored during backup, and the program main- 
tains a current catalog of files, including their 
size, location and date stamps. The program 
supports multitasking, runs fram the Work- 
bench or CLI, and supports anyAmlgaDOS in- 
tegrated hard disk. 

Westcom Is also releasing a spelling check- 
er for the Amiga, caUed Spel-It. (Yes, that's 
how it's spelled) 

That wraps it up for this month. Until next 
month, that's all from the valley. g 



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Lights . . . Camera . . . Action 

Continued from pg. 77 

Leeds: Do you expect that the entertain- 
ment industn' will find other uses for the 
Amiga? 

Lewis: The Amiga is the first computer 
that has the kind of features that make it 



usable for applications I use on a daily ba- 
sis. Clolor is es.sential in tlie film indusuy, 
and tile more of it die better Ease of use 
is equally important. I'm certain that as 
more people find out what can be done 
with an Amiga, itwill bcusedmoreoften. Q 



Aegis Development 
2210 Wilshire #277 
Santa Monica, CA 90403 
213-306-0735 


New Horizons Software 
7806 Evaline Lane 
Austin. TX ^8745 
512-280-0319 




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100 Verona Court 
Los Gatos, Ca 95030 
408-395-3838 


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1820 Gatew"ay Drive 
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Roosevelt, N'^' 11575 
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P.O. Box 948 
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Big Name Hunting.,. 

Conttmtecl from pg. "J 

also had a problem adjusting to the reali- 
ties of 180 X 256 lines of screen resolu- 
tion. The\" were used to creating 35MM 
material tliat would be seen by tlie pub- 
lie on a 20-foot movie screen. 

On the other side of the fence, we had 
to adjust to some \'erv' tougli qiialit}' stan- 
dards. We weren't adapting Froggcr^" to 
a home computer any longer. Now we 
were in the business of trying to dupli- 
cate tlie appearance and mannerisms of 
one of the most famous ch;iracters in the 
world. Recreating Donald Duck's \%addle 
in a fev\' pixels, for example, is almost im- 
possible. We kept telling the Disney peo- 
ple tiiat it couldn't be done. Tlie\- would 
listen to all of our reasons for not being 
able to solve the problem and simply re- 
ply. "Donald has to waddle because it's 
one of his well known chiiracteristics." So 
we'd go back to the drawing board ;uid 
try i^ain. After a while, our programmers 
discovered a wa)' to produce the waddle 
by manipulating several sprites, in con- 
junction with some otlier stuff. In this sit- 
uation, we accomplLshed what seemed 
to be impossible. 

Howe\cr. sometimes the Disney de- 
signers came up with an idea that reall\- 
was impossible to achic\'e. \Vhene\'er 
this occured. we worked \er\- closeh- 
witli tliem in the hope tliat some aspect 
of the idea could be sal\aged. Sierra pro- 
grammers had never shared tlic job of 
designing software witli outsiders Ix'forc. 
Isn't it ironic tliat tlie\''d be doing tliis 
work witli non-prognunmers? 
Jeimaine: Have \'ou had ;uiy unexpect- 
ed problems creating Disney software? 
Williams: In terms of released software. 
Sierra On-Line had to make a minor 
change in Micke}''s Space Adveuttiiv. be- 
cause we made tlie mistake of using die 
1970's design of Mickci,- Mouse instead 
of the 1980's version. The big difference 
is the cun'e of Mickey's ears. 

In terms of unrelcased software, 
Goof\''s Won! Factoty opened a whole 
new can of programming worms. 
Goofy"' is a Sierra/Disnei,' collaboration 
which helps children learn about the 
parLs of speech. Wlien we started tlie 
project witli the Disney designers, we 
didn't know what v\'c were in for. Our 
people thought that Goofy's Word Fac- 
toty would evolve into an arcade game, 
or something along that line of thinking. 
V(e had failed to take into account the 
Disne\" attitude tov\ards writing educa- 
tional material. After all, tliey'\e been 
working on school coarseware for al- 



most 30 years, and \\z\t their own opin- 
ions of how children should be taught. So 
here we went to them with a proposed 
for four arcade games, featuring Gooft' 
sorting out nouns, verbs, and so on. The)' 
examined our work, but asked us if wc 
could write the program in tlie form of a 
story construction set. Children could in- 
put sentences and make them animate 
on the screen. 

We decided to de\'elop this concept of 
the program, but it also presented some 
interesting problems. It's hard to gener- 
ate a program that takes in and under- 
stands information like "Tile space shut- 
tle danced to tlie moon." llic soft^vare 
actually contains a small space shuttle 
with legs that performs a jig. During the 
evolution of the program, we've taken 
about 100 different objects and given 
them the abilit)' to walk, run. dance, ;uid 
cr>'. It was also difficult to create progr;un 
commands that the average cliild could 
understand. Once the initial program 
was completed, it was so l:irge that we're 
not sure it will ever be officiiilly finished. 
Jermaine: VtTiat can you tell me about 
your relationship \\ith Jim Heason, tlie 
creator of the Muppets'"? 
■ttHliams: Our initial contact uitli Jim 
Henson was as a result of ha\ing a public 
relations office in Nev\' York Git)-. Roberta 
Williams, the co-founder of Sierra On- 
Line, wanted to meet and work with tlie 
Henson people, so our agenc)' anranged a 
private meeting. We discovered tliat lx)th 
parties could work well togellier, a con- 
tract Wits written up, iuid we started de- 
veloping the Dark Ciystal program. 

Jim Henson himself never visited us at 
Coarsegold, but Sierra On-Line went to 
Neu' York often when we were working 
witli tlicm. Our contact for tlie project 
was a man named Chris Cerf who works 
closeh' ^ith the Muppet designers, We 
received quite a bit of input from Henson 
and his group, and found them to be 
some of the most creative individuals 
we've e\'cr worked with, 
Jermaine: How did you acquire the 
Johnny Hart license to create the B.C. "' 
soliware? 

"V^llliams: Sierra On-Line actually had 
ver\' litde involvement in die B.C. pro- 
jects from a design standpoint. The Syd- 
ney- Development Company and Hart 
worked out all of the details. The first 
game in the series, B.Cs Quest for Tiivs. 
was acmally sold to us as a completed 
project. We paid six figures for a pack- 
age which included the Coleco version 
of the game, a commercial for the prod- 



uct that we ran on MTV' during the 
1984 Christmas season, and the exclu- 
sive U.S. rights to the game. 
Jermaine: Has Sierra On-line consid- 
ered buying the rights to many other li- 
cense properties? 

'V^illiams: Yes, we ha\'e. Over the years, 
we've seriously looked at the licenses 
to Hagar the Terrible"' . Beede Baile>'"', 
.\Ir. Bill"', 2010"', Mutiny on tlic Boun- 
ty"', The Smurfe"', Bett>- Boop"', Dun- 
geons and Dragons"', Family Circle"', 
and several others. Each of diesc tides 
had a lot of potential, but in miiny cases. 
the license was too cxpcnsi\e or we 
couldn't develop a presentiible prcxluct 
with the terms the licensor presented 
tons. 

It might surprise you that Family Cir- 
cle came the closest to being licensed 
by Sierra On-Line, considering tlie tides 
we've rejected. Wc seriously looked at 
creating a Family Circle Family Planner. 
This would have been a combination 
data base and spreadsheet diat could 
keep track of insurance, b;uik deposits, 
raccinations, and so on. Unfortunately, 
it ultimately became a question of cost 
versus benefit. 

Jermaine: Is there any aspect of Licens- 
ing we haven't covered? 
■Williams: I would like to point out tliat 
licensed games arc often sold on a 
countr\'-by-country b;isis. Tlic first B.C. 
program is a perfect example. In Amer- 
ica, B.C is marketed by Sierra On-line. 
In Japan, it belongs to Kilm;irk. in Can- 
ada, die B.C. license is die property' of 
die Sydney Development Company In 
England, U.S. Gold owns the riglits to 
B.C'sQ uest For Tires 

This form of licensing is great for a ti- 
de's licensor, but causes a major prob- 
lem among software comp;mics, For 
example, Frantek is one of our distribu- 
tors in Canada. They're a good custom- 
er and buy a lot of software. But we 
have to be careful not to sell them Dis- 
ney or B.C. material because our agree- 
ments with Disney and Hart forbid us 
to export those products. This may 
seem minor, but it complicates soft- 
ware marketing and upsets some of our 
customers. Q 

Part two of "Big Name Hunting in 
America" examines fvasonsfor not li- 
cetising a product apmject that could 
have evolved into a licensed pmject 
but didn't, and more inteivieu's with 
individuals fix)m your favorite soft- 
ware companies. 



COr^r^ODORE MAGAZINE 127 



ADDITION MASTER 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



Continued from pg. 92 

2500 PRINT" [CLEAR] PRIME NUMBERS '" BAQD 

2510 PRINT:PRINT"1. TEST A NUMBER" 

:PRINT"2. LIST PRIMES"'DCNK 
2520 PRINT"3. LIST NON-PRIMES" 

:PRINT"4. BACK TO MENU"'CBWK 
2530 GOSUB 470 : B=VAL (A$) 

:IF B<1 OR B>3 THEN RUN'JOTK 
2560 PRINT" (CLEAR] ENTER TO 

STOP"'BAWK 
2570 PRINT :PRINT"WHAT NUMBER TO 

START?" 'CBYN 
2580 C=0:INPUT CiGOSUB 475:C=INT(C) 

:IF C=0 THEN 2500' lUSQ 
2590 IF ABS(C)>4E5 THEN 

PRINT" . . .THINKING" 'FGAP 
2600 IF ABS(C)>4E9 THEN PRINT"THAT'S 

TOO BIG!":PRINT:GOT0 2510 'HMCK 
2610 IF B>1 THEN 2670'DGLE 
2620 A=ABS(C) :GOSUB 350'DIFF 
2630 IF A1=0 THEN PRINT C"IS PRIME" 

:GOTO 2660'FJAK 
2640 PRINT C"IS NOT PRIME, BEING" 'BBFJ 
2650 PRINT"DIVISIBLE BY " Al"AND"C/Al ' C 

FNL 
2660 PRINT:PRINT"NEXT"; :GOTO 2580'DHXK 
2670 FOR D=l TO 2 2 : A=ABS (C) :GOSUB 350 

:C=C+1' IRKP 
2630 IF(Al>0)=B-3 THEN D=D-1 : NEXT ' ILVP 
2690 PRINT C-1:NEXT:PRINT"M0RE?"'EE0N 
2700 GOSUB 465: IF A$="N"THEN 2500'EKVF 
2710 GOTO 2590 'BEND 
2990 : 'ABHM 

3000 PRINT" [CLEAR] SQUARE NUMBERS" ' BAUA 
3010 PRINT: PRINT"1. TEST A NUMBER" 

:PRINT"2. LIST SQUARES" ' DCWG 
3020 PRINT"3. BACK TO MENU" : K3=l+2E-7 

:GOSUB 470:D=VAL(A$) 'HRYI 
3030 IF D=0 OR D>2 THEN RUN'GEJC 
3040 PRINT:PRINT"WHAT NUMBER TO 

START? "'CBYG 
3050 PRINT"ENTER TO QUIT"'BACE 
3060 A=0:INPUT A:GOSUB 475 

:A=ABS (INT(A) ) :IF A=0 THEN 

3000' JWLL 
3070 IF A>4E9 THEN 3180'DILF 
3080 IF D=2 THEN B= INT (SQR ( A-1) ) +1 

:GOTO 3140'JPAL 
3090 B=SQR(A) :C=INT(B*K3) 'FLYJ 
3100 PRINTlPRINT A"IS ";'CDPX 
3110 IF A=C*C THEN B=C : PRINT"THE 

SQUARE OF"B:GOTO 3L30'HMPH 
3120 PRINT"NOT SQUARE" :PRINT"ROOT 

:"B'CCCE 
3130 PRINT" [DOWN] NEXT: " ; 

:GOTO 3050'CGOD 
3140 PRINT" [CLEAR] SQUARE" , "ROOT" ' BBBE 
3150 FOR B=B TO B+21:PRINT B*B,B 

:NEXT'HLOH 
3160 PRINT"MORE?"; :GOSUB 465 

:IF A$="N"THEN 3000' FMTJ 
3170 IF B*B<4E9 THEN 3140'EJRH 
3180 PRINT:PRINT"TOO BIG!" 

:GOTO 3010 'DGDI lHU 



Advertiser Index 



Rsodei 

Response Page 
No, No. 



Abacus Software 


1 


55 


Abacus Softwara 


1 


119 


Acorn of Indiana 


2 


126 


Action Soft 


3 


14 


Berl^elev Softworks 


4 


17 


Ben^eley Softworks 


4 


21 


Berks lev Softworks 


4 


22 


Berkalev Softworks 


4 


25 


Berkeley Softworks 


4 


57 


Berkeley Soffwort<s 


4 


59 


(5. J, Bfocfiman Associotes 


5 


51 


Cheotsfieef Products 


m 


102 


Cinemowore 


6 


47 


CMS Software 


7 


2 


CO, MB- Company 


* 


115 


Compufer Book Club 


a 


85 


Computer Vice 


9 


52 


Covox 


* 


117 


Data Eosf USA 


10 


13 


Digital Solutions 


11 


C2 


Electronic Arts 


12 


33 


Electronic Arts 


12 


C4 


Epyx 


13 


31 


Epyx 


13 


99 


Epyx 


13 


C3 


Emerald Components 


14 


51 


Enligtifenment, Inc. 


15 


65 


Fog 


16 


125 


K.F.S. Soffwore 


17 


10 


Kelex 


18 


83 


Midwest Software 


19 


125 


MicroProse 


20 


29 


NPS 


21 


125 


NRI/McGraw Hill 


■ 


81 


Precision Peripfierols 


22 


61 


Protesslonol Software tnc- 


23 


8 


Pro-Tecti-Tronics 


24 


78 


Protecfo 


25 


42 


Protecto 


25 


44 


Quantum Computer Services 


26 


36 


RCA Direct f^arketing 


V 


49 


S&S Wholesalers 


27 


63 


Soft Byte 


28 


114 


Starflite Telemorl^efing Inc. 


29 


95 


Superior Microsystems 


30 


113 


Sublogic Corporation 


31 


11 


Sublogic Corporation 


31 


27 


Tensoft 


32 


117 


Tevex 


33 


87 


TimeworKs 


34 


5 


Tussey Computer Products 


35 


6 



128 IVIARCH '87 



TEST DIVE ONE FOR YOURSELF. 




Name 

AddKSS- 



In their day, they ruled 

over three quarters of the 

earth's surface. 
During WWII, they 

viciously brought Britain 

to her 

knees. 

And 

Japan 

to the 

ground 
These were the silent 

killers: Tench. Gato. 

U-Boat 
And now, they return. 

In this, the most realistic, 

all-encompassing simula- 
tion ever aeated; 
for the personal : | 
computer. • i 

You will com- : i 
mand one of six j I 
types of Amer- '■ • 

ican subs or German Kriegs- 

marine U-Boats, during any 

year from 1939 to 1945. 

You'll perform one of over 

The No. ] battery. Sea guard radar stub. 

The ship's heart. 

Ynur ammo. 



TA KE OUR PREVIEW DISK FOR A SPIN. Dwt> this coupon in Ike 
mail with your check or money order, and we'll gladly send you to the 
South Pacific to hair it mil with an enemy fket. 

Mail to Sub Battle Previeiu. EG. Box 8020. Redtvood City. CA 94063. 



Quantity 



Total 



Apple II & ivnipal. I128K)- 

Commodotr (i4/!'2ii 

IBM PC & compal. 

Atari ST 

Macintosh 

Apple II GS 

Total Disks Ordered 



.- $1.50 ea. _ 
. $1.50 ea. _ 

- SJ.SOea. _ 
. $2.75 ea. _ 
. $2.75 ea. , 
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.Total Endosed- 

— Phone ( I- 



-Age- 



Cily/Slale/Zip 

Canadian orders please add 50C for additional postage. 

PUftsr allow -t tn f> iivrks far deliiiety. Offer e^pims 8f30/H7 and is fatid vnly in 

tlif amtinental U S. atul Cantida. k")i'J wherv ptvhibitt-d. ]0 





i 60 missions. Or youll en- 
" gage in the most difficult 
task of all: To make it 
through the entire war. 
^ Each vessel is com- 
pletely unique and 
painstakingly authen- 
tic, so youll have a lot 
to learn: Navigation. 
Weather. Radar. 



The 360^ periscopes. 



The sealed corttrol room. 
VourHQ. 



And the contents of a 
vital target book, 
among other things. 

\bur arsenal will in- 
clude deck and anti- 
aircraft guns. Torpedoes. 
And mines. 

But even all that may 
not be enough. 

Because besides the 
risk of bumping a depth 
charge or facing a killer 
Destroyer, you'll still 
have to contend with the 
gunfire of enemy aircraft. 

No simulation has 
ever had the degree of 
authenticity, gut- wrenching 
action or historical accuracy of 
this one. 

The first release of our new 
Masters Collection. And j 
a challenge of unbe- 
lievable 
depth. 

Apple II A atmpalibkxApplc IICS. 
Atari ST. C&i/I2S. IBM & 
ccmtpatibtes. Macintosh. 



Independent generatar Salt water tank, fur 

& diesel engines. trimming and compensating. 




5" ZS caL gun. 



Water purification. 



" The Bard is Back ! " 



/"'rom impossible dungeons and split 
^ second snares, the Bard and his party 

emerge. The Sceptre, so long for- 
gotten, gleams with power like an 
exploding sun. Even Phenjjlei 
Kai, the ancient archmage, 
bows his head in awe 

"1 smell serpents!" Slipfinger 
squeals, stealing away like 
the thief he is. Two arch- 
dragons slither out of the 
ground, their eyes burn- 
ing with the relentless 
fury of treasure lost. 

Protected behind the flame 
lizards, beyond the reach 
of normal weapons, a cack- 
ling wizard begins the eerie 
chants of a death spell. A spell 
that can finish the Bard 

and his party 

The time has come to battle-test the 
magic of the Destiny Wand - and reveal the 
awesome powers of The Destiny Knight.' 




The Best Ever 

Dungeon Role-Pfaying Game 

50'/Ji bij;gL'r than Bard's Tale. 
• An alt-new story line. 

Six cities and a huge overland 
w-ildemess to explore. 

Dozens of new spells - 
79 spells in all. 
• New real-time dungeon 
puiiles. You have to get 
through them before the 
clock stops ticking. 
• Summon and name 
monsters to become a per- 
manent part of your party. 
• More strategy in combat 
encounters - the weapons 
and spells you choose de- 
pend on the enemy's distance. 
A hank and casino. 
• A starter-dungeon for build- 
ing up your low-level characters. 
6 guilds for easier game saving. 
• Optional use of Bard's Tale charac- 
ters. Bard'sTale experience not required. 
Cluebooks available for both Bard's 
Tale and Bard's Tale 11™ 




You ge[ ;i new cliiss of nugic user- the 

Archmat;e, VVith 8 pmverful spells like 

Heal All, Fanskar's Nis;ht Lance, and the 

awesome Mangar's Mallot. 



There are Over 100 monsters, 

like this Ktier Drtine. Many animated. 

All dangerous. 



Hi 


— 




1 1 V' © 


• ? 


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\ 

i 




■ llflUCm: Troops beunre-l 
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Charoctcr Hsni RC Hi Ptx 
1 TenOV ODE L4 JtOHII 

1 sHiirsDM L< $1 BIB 
•t stiprmccB 1 t WBB 

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25 scrolling dunjjeon levels. 

All in color. All 3-D. Including 7 

different Snares of Death, a new kind of 

real-time pu:zle. 



c»*s^r 






The Bard^s Tale II 

The Destiny Knight 

from 



ELECTRONIC ARTS^ 



HOW TO GET IT: Visit ymir rctnik'T, or call 800-245-4525 (in CA call 8O0-562-] 1 12) for VISA or Mastercard orders. To buy by mail, st-nd a chuck, money 
urJer. or VISA or Mastercard informiition |o Electronic Arts, P,0. Box 75 JO, San Mateo, CA 944Ci. The price is $39.95 for the Commodore 64 version. Add S5 for 
shipping and handling (S7 Canadian). Allow 1-4 weeks for delivcrx'. The Bard's Tale 11 and Eleeironie Arts are registered trademarks of Electronic Arts. Ultima \& a 
registered trademark of Richard Garriott, Commodore i.^ a trademark of Commodore Electronics Ltd. For a copy of our complete catalog, send 50c and a stampedr 
self- addressed envelope to Electronic Arts Catalogs 1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404.